food and drink

You May Know Them As Raspados, But In These Countries, They’re Known As Something Else

If you grew up in an area with an elotero, you know that chasing him down during hot summers often involved buying a different treat: cold, fresh raspados. Raspados are like snow cones, but with extra flavor and personality. However, you wouldn’t ask for a “raspado” if you were in El Salvador or Puerto Rico.

Check out what raspados are known as in these different Latin American countries: 

In El Salvador, these shaved ice desserts are known as minutas. 

CREDIT: TE ESTOY WACHANDO SV / LUIS GIRON JR / FACEBOOK

These Salvadorian minutas are flavored with a variety of fruit syrups, and come with toppings such as tamarind jelly and fruit.

In Puerto Rico, people refer to these shaved ice desserts as piraguas.

CREDIT: PUERTO RICAN PRIDE / FACEBOOK

The shaved ice is stacked up like a pyramid and flavored with fruit syrups. The vendors who sell this dessert are known as piragüeros.

In the Dominican Republic, this frozen delight is known as a ‘frio frio‘ or ‘yun yun.’

CREDIT: @BABAD13 / @CHIQUIPOPRD / INSTAGRAM

Made with a variety of fresh fruits, the syrups for these frio frios are very sweet and delicious.

In Peru, there are two types of these frozen desserts: a raspadilla or a cremolada.

CREDIT: JACQUELINE CONTRERAS VILCHEZ / SUDAMAGS / HUAREZ PERU / FACEBOOK

While the raspadillas have chunks of ice, the cremoladas are more blended, appearing more like a smoothie.

In Brazil, you would refer to these frozen desserts as raspadinhas.

CREDIT: @KARLLAMT / @NATEMENDES / INSTAGRAM

If you’re a fan of condensed milk, these sweet raspadinhas are definitely for you.

In Colombia, these frozen desserts are referred to as cholados or raspaos.

CREDIT: FREAKING FROZEN / KASSANDRA SUAREZ / FACEBOOK

These desserts come with a variety of toppings such as fruit, wafer cookies and condensed milk.

In Panamá, these desserts are also known as raspaos.

CREDIT: KATY LEE / FACEBOOK

What makes these Panamanian raspaos unique is the malt powder they add on top, which includes wheat flour, barley malt and powdered milk.

In Costa Rica, people refer to this dessert as chúrchill.

CREDIT: @MARILYN.P.G / @PABLOPZ_77 / INSTAGRAM

This Costa Rican frozen delight does not only come with shaved ice, but with ice cream as well, which is what makes it even tastier.

In Cuba, you would refer to this sweet dessert as a granizado or cepillado.

CREDIT: DIEGO ARCOS / YOUTUBE

The vendors who sell these frozen treats are known as ‘granizaderos,’ and travel with their big blocks of ice and bottles of flavored syrups, which include flavors such as pineapple, strawberry, mint and more.

Annnnd now I’m craving a granizado.


READ: Here Are 13 Antojitos People Bring Back After Traveling To Colombia


What do you call this refreshing dessert? Let us know in the comments and hit the share button below! 

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This Tijuana Restaurant Has Become The Hub Of The Haitian Migrant Community Stuck In Mexico

food and drink

This Tijuana Restaurant Has Become The Hub Of The Haitian Migrant Community Stuck In Mexico

Great Big Story / YouTube

They just wanted to give Haitian refugees some home cooking during a difficult time.

Over the past couple of years, thousands of Haitians made their way into Mexico as they fled from natural disasters and other incidents that forced them to leave their homes. When immigration policies changed during the Obama administration, many Haitian migrants were stuck in Tijuana. Fausta Rosalía opened a lunch restaurant in Tijuana to cater to migrants who were making their way to the U.S. by way of Mexico. Now they give those migrants a little taste of home. Rosi Castillo, one of the workers at Lonchería Dulce, said their compassion also makes their restaurant a popular spot for Haitian migrants.

“Many of them would tell us that they didn’t have any money. We’d still feed them,” Castillo tells Great Big Story. “The first ones went through a lot. Many of them had no money or clothes because it had all been stolen from them.”


READ: Here’s Why Haiti Is Reaching Out To Mexico To Build Up Their Diplomatic Relationship

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