food and drink

Watts Quesadilla King “Chef Keith” Changed His Life Around After A Dream Made Him Give Up Selling Pot

@AllFlavorNoGrease/ Instagram

Chef Keith Garrett of the charisma-driven restaurant “All Flavor No Grease” grew up in Watts, a neighborhood in Los Angeles, with his parents and siblings. Unbeknownst to his mother, at an early age, he started selling weed, until one day someone offered him food stamps in exchange for his last eighth of weed. He thought to himself, “Food stamps? What am I going to do with food stamps?” Not one to turn down an opportunity, Garrett took the stamps. They were his last drug transaction ever. He went on to buy snacks with the stamps and began selling candy from his mother’s home. It was less risky and most importantly, it was less illegal.

Then a dream changed it all. Garrett woke up one day and just couldn’t stop saying “All flavor, no grease.” A friend recommended he sell tacos from his mother’s house since he was already selling candy there. He combined those ideas, and used his charismatic personality to create a social media following. The rest is history.

Chef Garrett started out with humble beginnings, all he had was a plancha and a dream.

His infectious energy kept folks coming back, the line long, and bellies full.

After all that hard work, faith, sweat and tears, Garrett saved up enough money to go from a grill to a new food truck, taking his business to a whole new level.

Take a look at his new digs and if you’re in LA, be sure to check him out.

Make sure to watch “What’s Good In Your Hood” for our in-depth interview with Chef Keith Garrett in the All Flavor No Grease kitchen.


READ: This Mother-Son Duo Preserved Mexican Culture And Saved Their Neighborhood With Authentic Food And Ingenuity


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You May Know Them As Tamales, But In These Countries They're Known As Something Else

food and drink

You May Know Them As Tamales, But In These Countries They’re Known As Something Else

The holidays are still about a month away, but it’s never too early to start thinking about tamales. And the best part is that there is way more than just one type of tamal you can enjoy.

Check out how these tamales are made differently in these Latin American countries. 

1. Oaxaca, México

CREDIT: LOS TAMALES OAXAQUEÑOS / FACEBOOK

Rather than being wrapped in corn husks, tamales Oaxaqueños are wrapped in banana leaves. As pictured above, they are a bit larger in size and are stuffed with chicken and mole negro.

2. Michoacán, México

CREDIT: MOYEJASBAR / YOUTUBE

In Michoacán, México, these tamales are known as corundas. They are wrapped in green corn plant leaves and are much smaller in size. Usually they don’t contain any sort of filling, so the flavor comes from the masa.

This is what corundas Michoacanas look like:

CREDIT: VISIT SAHUAYO / FACEBOOK

*Drooling*

3. Puerto Rico

CREDIT: BORIKEN RESTAURANT / I LOVE BEING PUERTO RICAN / FACEBOOK

In Puerto Rico, these tamales are referred to as pasteles. Similar to tamales Oaxaqueños, they are wrapped in banana leaves. These pasteles are prepared with different fillings, including pork, beef, chicken and vegetables.

4. Guatemala

CREDIT: DISCOVER GUATEMALA / PAULA ANTONIA PINEDA / FACEBOOK

Tamales Guatemaltecos are referred to as paches or chuchitos. As you can see by the color of the masa in the picture above, what makes these tamales unique is the sauce that is used to make them, called recado. In some stores you can find this sauce already prepared, but to make it at home, you need chiles, tomatoes, pumpkin seeds, sesames seeds and other spices based on your preference. These paches or chuchitos can be stuffed with chicken, pork, raisins or peppers.

5. Colombia

CREDIT: JARMA DAGER / FACEBOOK

This specific style of tamales in Colombia are known as bollos. There are different styles of bollos you can prepare, including bollos de queso, bollos de angelito, bollos de yuca and bollos de mazorca.

6. Belize

CREDIT: @KIMCANTEVEN / INSTAGRAM / @MR_COOLBEEZE619 / TWITTER

Tamales are referred to differently depending on which region of Belize you’re in. In the western part of Belize they’re usually referred to as ‘bollos,’ whereas in Corozal, a city near the border of Belize and Mexico, they’re referred to as tamalitos. Bollos are wrapped in plantain leaves, whereas tamalitos are wrapped in corn husks. These Belizean tamales are filled with either chicken, pork, vegetables, or if they’re made with sugar, they don’t include any filling.

7. Nicaragua

CREDIT: FOOD FOR THE SOUL / ESTAR BIEN SALUD / FACEBOOK

In Nicaragua, you would refer to tamales as nacatamales. These nacatamales are wrapped in plantain leaves, which is why they turn out larger in size. As shown in the photos above, they are filled with rice, potato, tomato, onions, bell peppers, olives and chile.

8. Honduras

CREDIT: CARMEN DURON / JUAN NUNEZ / FACEBOOK

In Honduras, this dish is also referred to as nacatamales. What makes these nacatamales Hondureños different from other tamales is the filling. They are stuffed with rice, peas, olives, potatoes and raisins.

9. Chile

CREDIT: @CONYROCKETS / INSTAGRAM / RON DU / FACEBOOK

In Chile, these tamales are known as humitas. They are wrapped with corn leaves and are commonly seasoned with basil. Since these humitas are not filled with meat, the main focus is the sweet, starchy taste of the freshly prepared corn masa. As shown above, humitas are sometimes topped with pieces of onion and tomato.

And now I can’t wait to have my abuela’s tamales in November and December. ?


READ: Here Are 13 Antojitos People Bring Back After Traveling To Colombia


How does your family prepare tamales? Tell us in the comments and hit the share button below!