food and drink

Here Are The National Dishes That Belong To These Latin American Countries

National treasures can come in the form of poets, art, literature and even in food. Here are some common dishes you can find when sitting down at a traditional restaurant from these Latin American countries.

1. Chivito – Uruguay

RECETA N°11: El mejor sandwich de Uruguay 🇺🇾… Un chivito!! 😍😍🤤🤤. Quién lo ha probado? Es el más clásico de allá, y es IMPOSIBLE que te quede mal. Es que cuando mezclas churrasco, jamón acaramelado, queso mozzarella y gauda derretidos, lechuga, tomate, tocino ahumado crocante, pimentones caramelizados, mayonesa y huevo duro, tienes el 90% de la pega hecha jaja. MEDIA MEZCLA! Es casi puro montar, pero les doy algunos tips en el paso a paso. Primero, hagan el tocino (sin aceite, solo con su propia grasa). Cuando esté crocante, lo reservan en un plato con toalla nova, y en la misma plancha o sartén tiran los churrascos. Así se mezclan con los juguitos del tocino y quedan más ricos. Por mientras, echan los pimentones y si quieren les agregan un poco de azúcar. Envuelvan una lámina de cada queso en una de jamón, y también lo tiran a la plancha. Recuerden condimentar tanto el tomate como el huevo duro (también funciona increíble con huevo frito, ojo 👀), y luego solo quedar montar todo!! Clave la mayo en ambas partes del pan (y tostadito, please). Una bomba de sabor, rápido y rico. #365Sanguchez #365Recetas #sandwich #chivito #Uruguay #chivitocanadiense #chivitouruguayo #Beef #churrasco #tocino

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Cooked beef steak (churrasco), mayo, tomatoes, mozzarella slices, olives, bacon, hard-boiled eggs and ham are assembled in between two bread slices for a chivito—Uruguay’s national dish. If you head to Uruguay to try this dish in person, expect your platter to include Russian potato salad or French fries.

Need more proof this is the national dish? In the city of Maldonado in Uruguay, a celebration is held yearly for a chivito party, complete with games, dancing, pony rides and music. CUTE! ☺️ 

2. Sopa paraguaya – Paraguay

Sometimes you can’t take things literally, like this national dish from Paraguay. Sopa de paraguaya is not soup in the conventional sense. Similar to cornbread, the dish is often baked in the juices of a roasted chicken and made with cornmeal, eggs, chopped onions, cheese, cottage cheese, milk and lard.

3. Sancocho – Panama

Noted as the national dish of Panama, sancocho can also be seen on the menus of countries including Honduras, Ecuador, Colombia, Dominican Republic and Venezuela. In Panama, the dish is called sancocho de gallina, and is made with chicken, the herb cilantro, mazorca, yuca, otoe, chopped onions, garlic and oregano. If you are suffering from a major hangover, sancocho is said to do the trick for getting you back into shape. 😎 

4. Pabellón criollo – Venezuela

Arepas might be the Venezuelan dish that is most widely known, but the national dish is actually pabellón criollo. White rice, black beans and shredded beef is placed on a plate and sprinkled with some queso palmita on top of the beans. If you want to get *que fancy* with it, ask for a pabellón a caballo, which means adding a fried egg on top.

5. Pupusa – El Salvador

Pupusa sunday!! #pupusa #brunch #homemade

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It doesn’t matter if you are eating them with a fork or with your hands (a common debate), pupusas are DELISH. The thick corn patties are stuffed with cheese and your choice of ingredients ranging from refried beans, chicharrones, and the loroco flower. Slather your pupusa with tomato salsa and curtido, a mixture of pickled cabbage and carrots. Started in 2005, there is even a National Pupusa Day in El Salvador. A holiday you can always be sure to put on your calendar.

6. Gallo pinto – Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Beans and rice. The yin and yang of many Latin American dishes. In Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the combination of this typical dish is called gallo pinto (spotted rooster) and is made with red or black beans, and arroz. The flavor comes from adding in chicken broth and chopped onion, sweet pepper and cilantro.

7. Pastel de choclo – Chile

Pastel de choclo is eaten in Chile, Argentina, Peru and Bolivia and uses ground up sweetcorn to make a paste. The paste is mixed in with some basil for a little kick and layered on top of a filling. Pino is used as the filling, which is onion, paprika and other spices cooked with minced beef.

8. Asados – Argentina

Grilling meat is one of the favorite pastimes for Argentines. It’s an opportunity for a communal gathering to talk about the past week, soccer and just have an all around good time. The meat (usually beef and sausage) is grilled on a parrilla and usually takes about two hours to prepare.  

9. Feijoada – Brazil

#feijoada 😋

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The Brazilian version of feijoada is often served with pork trimmings (ears, feet and tail), bacon, sausage, jerked beef, black beans and some rice. Depending on the region in Brazil you are eating this dish in, additional items are included, such as kale, bananas, celery and pumpkin.

10. Salteñas – Bolivia

Say it with us—savory foods are the holy grail of food. These baked type of empanadas are a little bit of sweet and spicy, often filled with a type of meat, raisins, olives, and potatoes. Fun facts: this empanada is named after the Argentine city of Salta and are baked upright instead of lying on their side.

11. La bandera – Dominican Republic

Papá (mi abuelo paterno) muy Cibaeño Dominicano decía: "Que comer comida calentá' daba cuaja" Básicamente decía que comer recalentado causaba pereza 🤣 Pero que Sabiondo Papá para que le hicieran su comida todos los días. Con este estilo de vida tan agitado, estos horarios de trabajo tan locos y esa comida que queda del día anterior y quien se resiste a no comérsela?! Felicito a todas (os) que pueden cocinar las 3 calientes todos los días… Yo mientras me voy a cenar este Calentao' Díganme a ver que opinan 🙄 . . . . . #cocinandoencasadeliz #cenandoencasadeliz #arrozconhabichuelas #ycarne #arrozconhabichuela #habichuelasguisadas #habichuelasrojasguisadas #labanderadominicana #albondigasguisadas #fritosmaduros #ensaladaverde #comidadominicana #dominicancooking #cocinadominicana #comidahechaencasa #rutagourmetdo #afuegoalto #dominicanfood #gastronomiadominicana #comidacalenta #recalentado #leftoverfood

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Literally translated as “the flag,” this Dominican dish often features stewed meat, rice and beans to represent the tricolored flag. The dish is also called “plato del día” or “el almuerzo” and is commonly eaten for lunch with a side of tostones, avocado and a side salad. SIGN US UP for this meal!

Are there any dishes on the list that you want to try? If so, share this article with your friends!


READ: In Case You Weren’t Already Aware, These Latino ‘Junk Food’ Snacks Are Totally Vegan

Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

food and drink

Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

@foodandwine / Twitter

Some times people discover new things and just can’t quite figure out how to describe them. Other times, people discover things people have been enjoying for centuries and don’t know how to explain it in non-colonizer terms. This is the situation Food and Wine found themselves in when they tweeted about these “sweet brioche-like rolls,” which are really conchas. The food magazine posted the tweet and it wasn’t long before Twitter users dragged them all over the internet for their tweet and the media outlet deleted the tweet but screen grabs are forever.

Here is the now-deleted but preserved tweet from Food and Wine that sparked the Twitter outrage.

CREDIT: @byelsieramos / Twitter

We all know that we were taught to add extra words and be descriptive to add to a word count in school. However, this was just a step too far for some people in the interwebs.

It wasn’t just the wording of the tweet that angered people. It was the cultural insensitivity.

CREDIT: @MGuzman_Detroit / Twitter

Guarantee that no Latino food journalist, Mexican or not, would have called this a “brioche-like” bread. This shows the importance of having people of color working in media to better tell these stories.

Folks were really defending the pan dulce like the cultural treasure it is.

CREDIT: @Salsalito / Twitter

Now all I want is to curl up on a couch with pan dulces and cafecito. Doesn’t that sound like a perfect day in?

The tweet brought out a lot of strong emotions in the hearts of concha-loving people.

CREDIT: @ACMBuckeyes / Twitter

It truly is one of those foods that takes you back to your childhood and holds you closer than any man or woman ever will. 💯

Some did see the tweet for what it was: click bait.

CREDIT: @jed_hackett / Twitter

It definitely did the job and caught everyone’s attention. Like, who wouldn’t stop in their tracks after seeing this tweet?

It really is disappointing to see them strip the concha of its ethnic and culture identity.

CREDIT: @raceandfood / Twitter

Far too often, Eurocentric ideals have tried to change and claim parts of different cultures for their benefit. So much of our identity as Latinos is in our food. It is our childhood. It is our uniqueness. And for those of us who were born and raised in the U.S., food serves as one of the most tangible pieces of a home country we’ve never known.

Some people laid it out in simple terms.

CREDIT: @GisEloquent / Twitter

Not 👏🏾 at 👏🏾 all! 👏🏾 Would you call brioche bread a less sweet concha-like bread for a Mexican audience?

Enter the obligatory Columbus reference because folks still honor this behavior.

CREDIT: @mcastimovies / Twitter

Not that people think you can just take land anymore, unless you’re Russia. But non-ethnic folks love finding things our communities have used for decades and act like it’s a brand new food group.

Oh, Food and Wine also considers it a “light breakfast,” which it’s not.

CREDIT: @marcela_elisa / Twitter

Have you never had one? Have you seen the size of these things? How is this a “light breakfast”?

In case folks didn’t know, one person did offer Twitter users facts about the different flavors of conchas that exist.

CREDIT: @IknowuGabriela / Twitter

Personally, I love them all. I could eat these sweet bread any and every day. Who’s going to the panadería with me after work?

Some legitimate questions have been asked about the use of brioche over concha.

CREDIT: @dasher2581 / Twitter

Obviously it is easier to say French words than Spanish words, right?

Also, some people don’t even know wtf is a concha so… 🤷🏽‍♂️

CREDIT: @vugetrbl / Twitter

It isn’t that surprising that people would get defensive about the fact that the concha was being stripped of its identity.

Even our dads got in on dragging Food and Wine.

CREDIT: @omoroti / Twitter

Spoke like a true Mexican father. “Que brioche ni que la chingada” indeed.

People are suggesting that they start hiring people of color so, you know, they can be accurate.

CREDIT: @JeronimoSaldana / Twitter

It’s not that hard to understand. If you want content about Latinx culture, hire Latinx people who know and live that culture every day. It’s like expecting Latinx journalists to understand the ins and outs of Japanese cuisine.

The publication didn’t release a statement about the Twitter backlash.

CREDIT: @adrianachavira / Twitter

They simply deleted the tweet and kept moving. However, that’s not how people want to see things resolved online now.

And people were looking for it.

CREDIT: @uxrivas / Twitter

It’s just another day in the office for a digital media company. Things spread far and wide when you put them on the internet and things never disappear once they are online.

Can we all agree that things should not be whitewashed anymore?

CREDIT: @RITucker_23 / Twitter

Just stop. It is not a good look on anyone. Either those whitewashing seem insensitive or the ones who are upset seem unjustly angry. It needs to end.

Leave things as they are and use the real names.

CREDIT: @LaNinaFresa / Twitter

If we, the Latinx community, can learn the difference between brioche and sourdough, you can learn what a concha is.

It really will be better for everyone if we just respect each others cultures.

CREDIT: @takesomeheart / Twitter

It is not that hard to respect each other and our foods. That’s what this how thing is about.

While the publication stayed silent, the woman who runs their social media channels did apologize.

CREDIT: @meg__clark / Twitter

At least someone at Food and Wine was big enough to admit their mistake.


READ: Rogelio De La Vega Is Killing The Game On Twitter And You Just Have To See For Yourself

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