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Here’s What Latinas Have To Say About The Ways In Which They’ve Dealt With Poor Body Image

A study published by Girls’ Attitudes Survey in 2016, asserts that in the U.S. 40% of girls have poor body confidence. This is a statistic that highlights an endemic problem that extends beyond the United States and stretches across the globe and affects communities on different levels. In fact, recent studies have shown that Latinas in particularly experience complications with body at rates that are comparable to women who are not of color. These statistics say quite a bit how common the universal struggle with body image is and how incredibly silent and dangerous it can be. 

Fortunately, more and more women are speaking out about this issue. This is especially for celebrities in recent years who have been impacted by the toxic culture that have manifested from the exchange of opinions on social media in an extreme way. To highlight the ways in which Latina celebrities are addressing the issue, we scavenged the internet for their most profound comments about their body image issues.

Selena Gomez 

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“I experienced [body-shaming] with my weight fluctuation for the first time,” Selena said to Raquelle Stevens during a video podcast for an episode of Giving Back Generation. “I have lupus and deal with kidney issues and high blood pressure, so I deal with a lot of health issues, and for me that’s when I really started noticing more of the body-image stuff… It’s the medication I have to take for the rest of my life — it depends on even the month, to be honest. So for me, I really noticed when people started attacking me for that,” she said. “In reality, that’s just my truth. I fluctuate. It depends what’s happening in my life. No one owes anyone else an explanation about their weight, and no one should be shamed or made fun of because of their body. Still, Selena said the critics “really messed [her] up for a bit,” and made her rethink how much of her life she puts online. I’m very happy with living my life and being present. Because that’s it. Similar to me posting a photo and walking away. For me that’s it. I will do a red carpet, I will do whatever. I don’t need to see it. I participated. I felt wonderful and that’s where the extent of it is,” she said. “I don’t care to expose myself to everyone and hear what they have to say about it.”

Lupita Nyongo 

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Speaking about embracing the color of her skin told The Hollywood Reporter recently that “There is a part of me that will always feel unattractive. That’s OK, because it will keep me grounded. I don’t need to be so full of myself that I feel I am without flaw. I can feel beautiful and imperfect at the same time. I have a healthy relationship with my aesthetic insecurities.”

America Ferrera

There’s no denying that America Ferrera, the actress who first caught our attention for her role in “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” has played a huge part in the body acceptance movement. Speaking to Health Ferrera said “I’m just now starting to feel like I want to feel strong in my body again. I didn’t work out as much as I imagined I would during my pregnancy. I was in triathlon shape when I got pregnant. I had so much on my plate and something had to give.”

She later explained in the interview that more important than what she looks like, she wants to monitor how food makes her feel. “I just try to be aware of how does what I eat make me feel,” she told the magazine. “Do I feel better? Do I feel energized? Does this make me tired and not feel great? I try to go easy on myself…which is a challenge because, like so many women, I demand so much more of myself than I would ever demand of someone else.”

Amara La Negra  

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“I used to hate my big thighs, my fat ass, my cellulite, my hips!” La Negra told the Miami Herald. “I was bulimic for three years and hospitalized twice. I always wanted to be skinny and tall like the Victoria’s Secret models. It took me a long time to accept that this is my body!”

Jennifer Lopez 

“It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.”

“It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.””It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.”

Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

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Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

Remember the terrible days when “nude” shoes were on-trend and Black women everywhere were forced to take part in something that was meant for white women? Welp, the nude lip trend has done quite a bit of not so great favors for women of color as well. Fortunately, the black-owned beauty shop Whippd Cosmetics is blessing Black women with nude glosses that work for all of our skin tones.

On June 27, Rachel Robins the entrepreneur behind the Whippd brand announced that she’d be launching a line of nude glosses for Black women.

“I created 6 nude lip glosses made with black women in mind and I just want them to go viral! Twitter do your thing,” Robins wrote in a tweet that featured a video displaying the line with meltaonin-rich shades.

Soon enough, Twitter did do its thing and her post wrangled in over 50,000 likes and 26,000 retweets. Speaking to Teen Vogue Robins says she was “extremely shocked but also humbled” by the support she received from Twitter. “So many people messaged me about how the collection made them feel seen. It warmed my heart and was the extra boost I needed to keep going.”

Whippd Cosmetics’ first launch, called the Coco Collection, will include six different nude shades.

The glosses are rich with pigments that cater to Black women who are so often overlooked by beauty brands that still use words like “nude” to cover only a portion of the beauty market. After all, what big brands call “nude” typically works for white women only.

Speaking about her own personal experiences, Robins says she wanted to create nude lip glosses that cater specifically for Black women.

“My experience of trying to find the perfect nude lip color to match me was always unsuccessful,” Robins explained. “The colors I would use would either be too light, too dark or have a blaring red undertone. I would often have to mix together my own shades and I knew other black women have encountered the same issue while shopping for the perfect nude lip.”

The gloss shades launched on July 1st and are available on WhippdCosmetics.com.

The Coco Collection promises to “compliment your complexion” with colors that as sweet-sounding as their names are. From latte, amaretto, butterscotch to brown sugar, ebony, and truffle these shades will sweeten your heart. While the entire collection costs $48, each gloss goes for $10.

If Whippd’s new gloss line isn’t exciting enough, you’ll likely fall in love with their line of body butters and scrubs which are infused with essential oils.

Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

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Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

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When it comes to buying products we all have a responsibility to know where our dollars go.

And while in the world of beauty it might seem a bit tricky to be conscientious of animal rights and our planet… it’s so essential. Fortunately, Sephora agrees and their latest announcement confirms it!

Recently, Sephora announced that it would no longer sell mink-based lashes online or in-store in an effort to combat animal cruelty.

Speaking to Allure this week, the big-box beauty store announced that they had started 2020 with efforts to phase mink lashes out of its stock. This week, after animal rights activist organization PETA launched a campaign demanding that the brand do so, the retailer confirmed that when it comes to false eyelashes they are going completely mink-free.

“Following a PETA campaign and emails from more than 280,000 concerned shoppers, Sephora has confirmed that it has banned mink-fur eyelashes and will purchase only synthetic or faux-fur lashes going forward,” PETA shared in a statement about the decision.

In a graphic video about the trading and selling of mink fur which is often used for coats and fake eyelashes, the organization urged Sephora to stop selling the beauty product.

*Warning this video is graphic*

The organization lambasted fur farms in its statement saying “As PETA pointed out in its letters to Sephora, mink fur typically comes from fur farms, where stressed minks frantically pace and circle endlessly inside cramped wire cages and many languish from infections or broken or malformed limbs. Some minks even self-mutilate as a result of the intensive confinement, chewing into their own limbs or tails. At the end of their miserable lives, they’re gassed or electrocuted or their necks are broken.”

Confirming their decision to take mink off of its shelves, Sephora wrote in a statement that they “have always been committed to upholding the highest standards of beauty, and we take our responsibility to communicate transparently and honestly with our clients about the products we carry seriously.”

The brand went on to say that they shared with PETA “earlier this year we had already decided to begin phasing mink products out of our assortment in 2020. We have only ever offered products our clients can trust and we stand by the people and partners who have made the Sephora experience what it is today.”