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Victoria Secret Model Adriana Lima Says She Lost Her Virginity When She Was In Her Late 20s, So Did These Mujeres

Often, it feels like society is pushing us to face sex and our own sexuality. Sex is in our music, on our TVs and movies and in our face more often than not. It’s true that sex sells and everyone wants to feel desirable, but that doesn’t always mean we’re looking to do the ACTUAL deed.

Contrary to what society suggests, it isn’t all that uncommon to wait to explore one’s sensual side. Whether it’s the first kiss or going all the way, people sometimes choose to hold off on these events. Obviously, there are several different reasons to want to wait and we wanted to hear all about them.

We asked readers to share their experiences with sexual late blooming and here’s what they had to say.

Sometimes, people find it hard to believe you’ve waited so long.

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“This is more personal than I like to get on social media but I waited until marriage and was a month shy of 25. I had a male cousin who flipped and could not believe I had never had sex. It actually turned into a pretty comical moment. He kept repeating over and over again in surprising disbelief, ‘Damn I have a 24 yr old cousin who is a virgin?!?!'” — @arcewb

Sometimes you’re waiting for the right person.

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“Yeah, I also waited long past by 26 yrs. It’s hard 2 believe but I wanted my first time 2 be with someone who loved me back. We did it and it was sweet. We were gonna get married. Ironically we didn’t stay together but I dont regret it.” — @libyillescas

Some focus more on the journey than the end goal of sex.

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“I’m about to turn 26 and I’m still esperando for the correct moment and correct persona. Never having had sex isn’t something to be proud of or feel shameful about. It’s just your journey and your right to choose for yourself what you want.” — @labrujaderichmond

Sometimes life just gets in the way.

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“28, still haven’t. At the beginning it was marriage, then it became just the one, then just a person it felt right with and finally just school and life and work got in the way of exploring any form of romantic relationship.” — @angiebanuelos

Sometimes our cultural values keep us from exploring sex.

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“It’s still happens, I was in my 30s. My father was a southern Baptist minister growing up. I have been with my boyfriend for 3 yrs now. Everyone should make up their own mind for when they are ready.” — @drkimby_fpvgirlfriend

Some aren’t even granted the opportunity until they gain more freedom with age.

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“I had my first ‘real’ first kiss — the one I count anyway — with a male dancer a few weeks after my first PRIDE at 21. I didn’t wait for funsies. My mother was controlling of everything and I could only catch rides to work until we moved back to Houston from the countryside but by then idk. I didn’t want to just get it over with. I wanted someone I really liked. Didn’t help I was dark skinned and plus sized back then either. For the people who were MY type, I wasn’t theirs.” — Anonymous

Ultimately, no matter when you choose to explore your sexual side, make sure it’s your decision.

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“I was 29 when I first had sex. I still remember when I was asked why I waited so long. So for those women out there who are waiting, never forget it’s your choice and don’t let anyone make you feel bad for being a virgin. Whether you wait for marriage or for the right person who makes you feel comfortable. It’s your choice and no one should judge you for it. Your body, your choice!” — @mars_bars82

Sex During A Global Pandemic: What Do The Experts Say?

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Sex During A Global Pandemic: What Do The Experts Say?

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We’re all social distancing right now. And that begs the question: how do you have sex in the era of COVID-19 self-isolation? Is it even safe to have sex during the pandemic?

According to several public health agencies, the answer really depends.

Let’s start off with the facts about Coronavirus and sex.

Coronavirus, which causes Covid-19, is spread by direct person-to-person contact or by people who are close to (within six feet) each other—as it’s believed that the virus is expelled in respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). You can also pick it up from contaminated surfaces if you then touch your face without washing your hands properly first and therefore introduce the pathogen into your body.

So, yes, sex can contribute to spreading the coronavirus. You’re clearly close enough to someone when you’re naked on top of each other, and you are also probably kissing, or at least breathing heavily. (

But let’s be clear: Covid-19 is not contracted directly from sex – it’s not an STI. That distinction matters, because safe sex during the pandemic depends on your current relationship situation and, well, why you’re having sex in the first place.

So what are some best practices according to experts? Start with some self-love.

Since the start of the pandemic, online sales of sex toys have skyrocketed. So you can take solace in the fact that you’re definitely not the only one enjoying a bit of self-pleasure.

According to EDC Retail, which calls itself Europe’s market leader in erotic toys, the sales of vibrators, dildos and other sex toys were 162 percent higher than in the same period last year. In fact, sales have been so strong that the supply of toys and accessories from factories in China threatened to dry up – leaving consumers high and dry. EDC Retail even warned of a possible shortage of sex toys in February.

Masturbation also ensures that you’ll be safe from contracting the virus as you’re following social distancing guidelines.

Some public health agencies have even suggested making sex a little more ‘kinky’ to make it safer.

Most public health agencies have released safe sex guidelines for the pandemic. In fact, just this week, “glory holes” was trending in Canada because the BC Centre for Disease Control listed it among the tips for safer sex during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Their guidelines say to “choose sexual positions that limit face-to-face contact. Use barriers, like walls (e.g., glory holes) that allow for sexual contact but prevent close face-to-face contact.”

And “glory holes” aren’t only recommended in British Columbia. In New York, health officials suggest to make sex “a little kinky.” The city’s public health agency suggests getting “creative with sexual positions and physical barriers, like walls, that allow sexual contact while preventing close face to face contact.”

Folks on social media are having a field day tweeting creative ways to use walls and barriers, even suggesting things like plexiglas shields (like those in grocery stores), holes in sheets, mail slots, doggy doors and donuts.

But if glory holes sound a little too raunchy for you, don’t worry, experts also recommend sexual positions that limit face-to-face contact, such as as doggy style.

And if you’re single or dating – you should definitely not be having sex right now.

Because of social distancing and state-mandated shelter-in-place guidelines, it’s not okay to go out on dates right now—unless those dates are over FaceTime or some other video chat app.

The New York City Health Department recently issued guidelines on Covid-19 safe sex practices, recommending against having sex with anyone outside of your household. (In other words, someone you already live with.)

And sorry but having a “quarantine sex buddy,” where you and they only have sex with each other during the pandemic, is not recommended, First of all, the idea goes against social distancing, and you don’t actually know how closely (if at all) they’re staying away from other people.

Or maybe, like so many others, you’re just not having much sex these days – and that’s totally normal.

According to an NBC News poll of roughly 11,000 people, at least 50% said that the coronavirus has negatively impacted their love life. That’s a lot of people not dating, not being intimate with others, and most likely not having sex.

According to Ian Kerner, PhD, a psychotherapist and sex counselor, “A lot of people in quarantine aren’t feeling their best, or feeling as sexy. If you’re home all day and you’re not changing out of your pajamas or applying as much self-care or going to the gym, your sexual self-esteem can start to go down.”

But that’s OK. You’re not the only person feeling this way. Between being stuck in tiny apartments or around family, working longer hours and feeling the mental and financial effects of the coronavirus pandemic, on top of anti-racism uprisings, our libidos have had way more lows than highs.

But if you do decide to engage in sexual activity, make sure you follow these expert tips on how to reduce the risk of contracting or spreading Covid-19 along with following all other safer sex practices.

Latinas Shared Their Best Bits Of Marriage Advice And The Comment Section Got REAL

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Latinas Shared Their Best Bits Of Marriage Advice And The Comment Section Got REAL

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Recently, a FIERCE reader posed a pretty poignant question on Twitter: “If you could give me advice on marriage, what would it be?”

Married folks and mujeres that were once married offered up their best bits of advice! Check them out below!

View marriage as a bonus not the piece to a missing puzzle.

My advice: don’t do it!! JUST KIDDING. my mom says, view marriage as an additional bonus to your life not as a completion . You’re an amazing complete woman on your own.” –pelucaazul

Beware the red flags.

“As someone going through a divorce: make a list of all the red flags (small and big) and play each one out and truly determine if any are problematic. The small red flags now always come back up later. Some can be worked on, some can be communicated through , but some are a sign of unsettled trauma/machismo/addictions/narcissism etc.”- _ashlyndarling

Keep up the dating game.

“Never stop dating each other!”-mariaelena34

If you’re getting advice about your life, get it from the right people.

“Its between you two!!! . Dont try to fit your relationship into stereotypical molds… what works for you may not be what other ppl say! Also, dont bad talk your boo even if you’re mad and frustrated. What you feed, grows. And always remember to flirt with your husband lik y’all still dating. And, if you turn to someone for advice, make sure they understand healthy marriages. Soooooo many ppl in the world giving advice but dont have a healthy successful marrige…. be open wi th your boo, be honest, nd hve fun! Best wishes&blessings – AH.”-autumnhype

Don’t compare yourself. It’s not a tit for tat game.

“Never compare yourself to other marriages or your parent’s marriage. Your marriage is whatever you want it to be and cultivate together, this is completely up to you and your spouse. This is the most freeing thing I have ever heard and made me appreciate my marriage more!”-cathrinemolstad

Don’t put up with behaviors or treatments within marriage that your instincts are telling you are wrong.

“Married 20 years and my best advice is to trust your instincts. In my marriage what has worked is respecting my partner and expecting that same level of respect, that reciprocity goes for kindness, compassion, patience, and forgiveness too. But, ultimately, this is big, don’t marry someone if your instincts are telling you it’s wrong, don’t put up with behaviors or treatments within marriage that your instincts are telling you are wrong, and don’t stay if those same instincts are telling you it’s wrong. You know you, what you want, need, can and can’t handle. That’s the voice to defer to – not your friends, society, or family. The union should bring you and the other person great personal growth. I realize that all sounds like a high bar and it is. People get and stay married, settling for far less than they should, because there is (or they perceive) external pressures to do so. Resist this. Marriage is not for everyone and not every partner is a commit your life partner. Finally, though, it’s 2020. Marriage isn’t irreversible. If it’s not working, that’s okay and don’t take it as a failure, but an awareness of your worth and growth.”-sheexistshere

Grow with each other.

“Grow with each other. Ive been with mine for 8 years (married 2). We started dating at 16 and 19, and man have times changed. If we didn’t make mistakes, keep each other accountable, help each other figure out what we each wanted to do, we won’t be together after all this time.” –danielaherreranyc

Communication is key

“Always communicate even if it sounds like something silly and always find time for each other no matter how busy your day can be.”-lauraelnasser