Fierce

A Man From Colombia’s Arrest Was Dramatically Captured On Video After He Was Caught Taking ‘Upskirts’ Of Women

Another day, another devastating story illustrating how pervasive the sexual harassment of women is in the world. As technology develops, there will always be predators looking to use technological advancements as simply another means to take advantage of women. The prevalence of camera phones, as well as social media, has made it easier than ever for people to exploit women anywhere at any time. Luckily, as the Me Too movement wages on, many women no longer feel like they have to be silent to protect themselves. And because of this, the general public has recognized the lasting damage that structural sexism and sexual abuse has had on women as a whole.

This change has never been more clear than with the newest viral headline making the rounds on the internet. On Wednesday, Spanish police announced to the press that they had arrested a 53-year-old Colombian man suspected of taking more than 500 “upskirt” videos of unsuspecting women and uploading them to porn websites. The man, whose identity has not been revealed, was caught mid-act following a long investigation. 

The police were first aware of the suspect after the unconsensual videos were uncovered on a pornographic website. According to authorities, at least two of the women filled were minors. 

On Wednesday, the Spanish police posted a video to their social media accounts of the suspect’s arrest.

The police captioned the video as follows: “In the Madrid subway, we stopped one of the biggest predators of women’s privacy. He recorded videos under skirts and dresses and published them on pornographic websites. He acted daily and compulsively.”

The video starts mid-arrest and paints a dramatic scene, the man struggling against the police as they restrain him. 

Eventually, they wrestle him to the ground in the subway and are finally able to handcuff him. According to police, the man’s behavior was “compulsive” and he filmed women everywhere from subways to supermarkets. The man allegedly hid his phone in a pocket of his backpack and sometimes even approached victims under the pretense of making small talk in order to better capture his recordings. He then uploaded the videos to various websites, sometimes adding music to the recordings and editing them to be in slow-motion.

To say the man was a predator would be an understatement: he uploaded approximately 283 videos online to pornography websites–some videos including shots of the unsuspecting women’s faces. Other than his predatory behavior, the Colombian man apparently led a very nondescript life, working at a warehouse in Pinto and living a quiet life in the Madrid suburb of Usera. According to authorities, he used the time in his daily commute to film his victims–once up to 29 women in a single day. 

But what’s possibly even more disturbing than his behavior is the popularity of his porn account: the suspect had 3,519 subscribers, 85,000 visitors, and almost 1.4 million video views altogether. 

The popularity of the account proves that these kinds of boundary-crossing pictures are in high demand on the internet. The man’s arrest has launched an important debate among the public about technology, social media, and the different ways it is being used to exploit and take advantage of women. While countries like the United Kingdom outlawed the act of “upskirting” in April (with offenders facing up to 2 years in jail), other places have been slower to act. In fact, women in South Korea have taken to the streets to march against the common practice as well as other hidden-camera recordings of them. Even in Spain, the act of “upskirting” isn’t technically illegal, and this suspect was instead arrested under the charge of “privacy violation” and “corruption of minors.”

Many places don’t consider upskirting a crime because many of the photos aren’t “graphic”, as many of the women have underwear on. 

Additionally, in many places, perpetrators can’t be charged with voyeurism because the intimate photos they’re taking are being done in public places. According to many laws, voyeurism only applies to pictures and videos taken in private areas (like bathrooms and changing rooms). 

But any woman who has been violated by photos taken or shared without their consent will tell you that it’s not always the content of the photos and videos that is so humiliating, but the fact that they have no agency in its distribution. Women shouldn’t have to monitor what they wear or walk around in fear simply because they’re afraid that some man will take a picture of them without them knowing. But as we shine spotlights more often on the consequences of this practice, and as more and more women come forward with their stories, it seems as if the tides are turning. In this case, we’re glad for the arrest and we hope for justice to be properly served.

A Jury Has Finally Been Selected For The Harvey Weinstein Rape Trial And Gigi Hadid Is Out

Entertainment

A Jury Has Finally Been Selected For The Harvey Weinstein Rape Trial And Gigi Hadid Is Out

@Current_Knewz / Twitter

After more than 100 women accused him of varying degrees of sexual assault, Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial is now underway. The jury selection process began almost two weeks ago in New York State Supreme Court, where a diverse pool of prospective jurors gathered, ready for the opportunity to participate in one of the most intense legal battles of the #MeToo movement. However, the process of selecting an impartial jury proved difficult—while 120 prospective jurors showed up that first day, many people admitted an inability to remain unbiased, which ultimately disqualified them from participating in the trial. This pattern continued the following day, when 47 of the additional 120 prospective jurors were dismissed for the same reason.

This past week, one of the people dismissed was supermodel Gigi Hadid. Hadid claimed that she could be fair and impartial if selected as a juror, but her involvement in the Hollywood social scene gave Judge James Burke pause.

Credit: Jim Haffrey / Associated Press

According to a pool reporter inside the Manhattan courtroom, Burke read a list of potential witnesses, asking the potential jurors to speak up if they knew anyone on the list. Hadid raised her hand and said, “I have met Salma Hayek.” She also affirmed that she had met Weinstein before.

“I think I’m still able to keep an open mind on the facts,” she said. But Burke was not convinced, and dismissed her from the selection pool.

Although Weinstein has been accused of harassing scores of women, the trial addresses just five charges from two accusers. The charges include predatory sexual assault, rape, and a criminal sexual act in the first degree. If convicted, he could spend the rest of his life in prison. Yet Weinstein has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges, and he maintains that all of the sexual encounters in question were consensual.

The trial is estimated to last until March, with two weeks of jury selection and eight weeks of arguments and testimony—all before actual deliberations are due to start.

Credit: Associated Press / Mark Lennihan

According to Weinstein’s attorney, Donna Rotunno, one of the major challenges with securing a jury was finding people who are able to commit to such an extensive trial. Weinstein’s defense team has also expressed concern with a perceived inability to locate impartial jurors in New York City—as a metropolitan area heavily tuned in to the media, Weinstein’s team feared that most prospective jurors have been following the case and forming opinions about Weinstein’s misconduct since it was first brought to light in 2017. According to CNN, Weinstein’s team made multiple attempts to move the trial to different cities in New York, where the likelihood of locating unbiased jurors might be higher.

On January 16, seven jurors—four men and three women—were seated. But that day, prosecutors accused Weinstein’s team of deliberately eliminating young white women from the pool of prospective jurors, as Weinstein’s lawyers had used half of their peremptory challenges to excuse prospective white women jurors who were not dismissed for bias or previously deemed unfit by prosecutors.

Why is this important, you may ask? Well, first of all, it’s illegal to use peremptory challenges to eliminate potential jurors on the basis of sex, race, ethnicity or religion.

Second of all, while lead prosecutor Joan Illuzi did not clarify why a lack of white women jurors would be problematic for the prosecution, legal experts said that the defense seemed to assume that jurors of this demographic were especially likely to sympathize with Weinstein’s accusers. So, the idea is that the defense tried to limit jurors of this kind in a strategic attempt to prevent even subconscious opposition to Weinstein during the trial.

Yet defense lawyers dismissed this accusation, citing specific reasons for rejecting each individual white woman and claiming that the remaining white female jurors’ responses to a questionnaire ultimately deemed them unfit to sit on the jury.

Rotunno said that the responses to the questionnaire that aimed to determine whether prospective jurors had experienced sexual assault (or knew someone who had) ultimately determined who would be a viable, unbiased candidate for jury selection, and that the defense’s resistance to seating certain individuals “had nothing to do with race or sex.” But due to the high number of women—regardless of race—who have experienced sexual violence, this stipulation largely diminished the number of women deemed fit for consideration at all. On the first day of jury selection alone, roughly 30% of the 120 prospective jurors stepped down for bias linked to personal experiences of sexual assault.

Ultimately, the final 12-person jury is comprised of six white men, one black man, two white women, and three black women. The alternate jurors, who will only serve if one of the first 12 jurors must withdraw, include a white man, a Latina woman and a black woman.

A 5-Year-Old Girl Was Abandoned By Her Parents And Found Chained To Her Bed In Mexico

Things That Matter

A 5-Year-Old Girl Was Abandoned By Her Parents And Found Chained To Her Bed In Mexico

Daily Mail / Twitter

More often than we might like, headlines tend to describe literal, living nightmares—and the recent story about a 5-year-old girl abandoned by her parents in Mexico is no exception. On January 3, a young girl was found in an empty house in San Luis Potosi, tethered to her bed by a rusty chain. Neighbors had heard cries for help coming from the house and notified the local police. When authorities arrived on the scene, they discovered that the girl was living in terrible conditions: not only was she alone, but she was surrounded by piles of trash and filth. Mexican newspaper Excelsior reported that investigators also found a small bucket near the bed, which the child was forced to use as a toilet. She had bruises on her leg and ankle from the metal cuff. After noting her injuries, police transferred her to a local hospital where and she was found to be in stable condition. As of now, the state prosecutor’s office is collaborating with child protective services and police in an attempt to locate the child’s parents.

Not much is yet known about this child (her name is not being released), and no arrests have yet been made. But what we do know is that her situation is not unique.

When searching for information about this story, countless results recounting nearly identical situations appeared, with headlines like “Girl, 6, Was Chained to Bed for 5 Years in Norco Home;” and “‘They’re Chained Up to Their Bed’: Hear 911 Call From Girl Who Escaped Captivity, Saved Her 12 Siblings.” Although each case offers its own twisted nuances, we can’t help but wonder: How is it possible that this horror story of captivity, abuse, and neglect is so common?

The tale that garnered the most media attention in recent years—mentioned in the above headline about a girl who escaped to save her 12 siblings—chronicles the experience of the Turpin children, all of whom were held captive by their parents over the course of almost three decades.

The torture and abuse enacted upon the Turpin children started as neglect, according to officials. In the beginning, the children’s parents would tie them to their beds as a form of punishment, using rope before later graduating to padlocks and chains. At first, the children would only be confined for short periods; but over time, these stints began to stretch longer and longer, sometimes spanning days or weeks, and the siblings—aged 2 to 29—would not be allowed to use the bathroom.

When the siblings were discovered by police in January 2018, almost all of them were severely malnourished. Evidently, when they were not chained up, they were fed very little food according to a strict regimen. Sometimes, the Turpin parents would buy food and place it in plain sight, taunting the children by prohibiting them from tasting it. According to Riverside County District Attorney Michael Hestrin, at the time the siblings were rescued, one 12-year-old weighed what an average 7-year-old might weigh, and the female 29-year-old clocked in at a mere 82 pounds. The family dogs, on the other hand, appeared to be in good spirits and overall good health.

In spite of her emaciated physical condition, the 17-year-old managed to escape by climbing out a window and dialing 911 on a deactivated cell phone (federal law requires that all cell phones be capable of contacting emergency services, even those that are not operational). According to Hestrin, she and some of her siblings had been devising an escape plan for over two years.

So, statistically, how many victims of domestic captivity are able to share successful stories of escape? It’s tough to say, as there is no definitive number of children in domestic captivity, and it’s ultimately impossible to compare the numbers of known cases with unknown, still-active cases.

Plus, experts say that the potential consequences of attempting to escape often deter victims from even trying. Fear of violence and/or punishment—paired with psychological conditions like Stockholm Syndrome, which occurs when captives become emotionally attached to their captors—is often a major reason that captives don’t try to flee. Long periods of abuse can also lead to a loss of perspective in victims, causing them to feel grateful for any sort of lull in abuse and potentially falling into complacency or acceptance when the abuse is paused or slowed.  

Although the children mentioned above were held captive by their own parents, human trafficking—and especially the trafficking of young children—continues to be a pervasive global issue. According to the latest global estimates, 25 million adults and children are currently being exploited for forced labor, and that is not a comprehensive metric. The statistics surrounding the breadth of human exploitation are staggering, and if you suspect that someone is a victim of trafficking, the National Human Trafficking Hotline is the best resource. Call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll-free at 1-888-373-7888: Anti-Trafficking Hotline Advocates are available 24/7 to take any and all reports of potential cases.