Fierce

A Venezolana Made A ‘Game Of Thrones’ Comic Starring Her Latina Mom And Latinas Can’t Stop Laughing

For eight straight seasons, the nerdiest of fans of the widely obsessed over Game of Thrones series have mulled over theories, conspiracy theories, Comic-Con outfits, and, often the most fun to see, fan drawings. While even the most impressive and realistic renditions of the characters of the series have managed to light us on fire like the breath of a Targaryen dragon, nothing has lit up the Latino fanbase of the series quite like the images created by a Venezuelan fan of the series.

Alie is a Venezuelan artist who draws comics and posts them on Instagram under the pen name @illustralie. She also does a lot of about her mom.

Like most of us, Alie’s work is often intrigued by el camino de la mamá and she’s depicted her own mother’s sense of humor and Latinidad in quiet a few of her illustrations.

With so much hype surrounding the new season of Game of Thrones, Alie’s latest piece comes in great timing.

@illustralie / Twitter

LOL watch out for spoilers!!

It even features the world’s sweetest version of the White Walker

(Which TBH anyone who saw season 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 and did NOT close their eyes at the sight of the blue-eyed Others know this is nearly damn impossible to do.)

And her bold Mom attacking a WW to get a sweater on it.

Which also TBH is all of us.

LOL and her mom even has classic GOT jokes.

Just really wish she had a spoiler about who that Night King is ya know?

But at least the WW gets some good sopa in the end.

‘Cause there’s nothing seriously better than when mama makes it.

“Sopita de mamá 👌,” one user wrote in response to the comic’s joke.

Of course, Latino GOT fans are giving the best reactions to the post.

“Si las madres intervinieran en GOT jajajajajjaa,” one user wrote in response. Just about everyone agrees that their mom would do the same.

Here Is What You Told Us You Wanted To Accomplish In The New Year And We’re Rooting For You

Culture

Here Is What You Told Us You Wanted To Accomplish In The New Year And We’re Rooting For You

Unsplash

It’s that time of year where we make promises to ourselves (and to others about how we’re going to try a little harder in the coming year. How next year is going to be a big one. It’s going to be 2020! We asked our female readers what New Year’s resolutions they had for 2020, and here are some really great ones that we can all aspire to. 

“Follow through with applying to grad school.”

Credit: Unsplash

This is an excellent resolution and one I can relate to 100 percent. This year, after years of graduating from college, I finally decided to really apply for grad school and not put it off any longer. While it may seem challenging to go back to school, especially if you’re working full-time and are scared to get into debt, there are ways to jump over those hurdles. 

For starters, if you’re still working, sign up for only one class. This is manageable, and I can say from experience. If you sign up for one class, you can fit it into your schedule. There’s also a ton of schools that offer online courses, and that works for busy people even more because you can be on the go and still get an education. 

Now if you don’t want to get into debt, but want that second degree, there are so many scholarships that are mainly for people who are going back to school, or that are moms, or that are over a certain age. There are scholarships for the most individual person, all you have to do is Google!

“To have no resolution and just let life happen.”

Credit: Unsplash

Let’s face it, we’re under a lot of stress already. If you’re not busy doing one thing, we’re planning something else. The New Year should have more spontaneity. Who can’t relate to seeking less control? We tend to get so worked up about all the things we need to get done in the day that we rarely have time to let things just be.  Don’t be on your phone every second, take a walk, meet up with friends, but just do it without planning so much. 

“Wake up earlier to have me time in the mornings.”

Credit: Unsplash

As soon as the alarm goes off, we are go, go, go. We go to bed thinking about all the stuff we have to do the next day, and we typically wake up groggy and anxiety-ridden. But, one thing that helps, is to get go to bed a little earlier. This gives you time to wake up and not rush out of bed. It also gives you extra time to lay there and think and be chill. 

If there’s something else that you want time for in the day, whether it is meditating, praying, writing, working out, or walking the dog — get up even 30 minutes earlier, and it will make all the difference in the world. Just remember, go to bed earlier. It will pay off. 

“Be outdoors more — bask in the presence of beautiful scenery and beautiful people.”

Credit: Unsplash

This resolution is everything because it will help you and your soul in so many ways. The less you are cooped up indoors, stuck behind the computer or on the phone, the less you enjoy life. Try going to a park or go on a hike at least once a week. You will find that you have more peace in your life without making a huge change. 

“To be fearless!”

Credit: Unsplash

Being fearless can mean a lot of different things to a lot of people, but what you should think about is what worries you the most. The things that keep you up at night. The things that hold you back. Pushing those things aside is what fearless is all about. Fighting against the things that scare us, that hold us back from accomplishing our dreams. That is being fearless. Even though we can’t be fearless every day, little moments of overcoming our fears is what matters. 

“Smothering myself with self-love. I decided to love myself as hard as I’ve loved others.”

Credit: Unsplash

If you give a lot to others, to your kids, to your family, to your work, you should be giving yourself that same devotion. You may think you don’t have time to be good to yourself but you do by doing little things throughout the day. Indulge in your favorite kind of tea, watch your favorite trash TV show all alone, take an extra-long bath, by yourself those shoes you’ve been coveting for a while. Love yourself by being kind to yourself. Cut yourself some slack. You are a human being, who needs just as much love as everyone else. 

READ: Make This New Year Different By Making Active Positive Changes Instead Of Overwhelming Resolutions

A Photo Of This Sad, Sweet Old Lady Went Viral Because She Hadn’t Sold Any Of Her Handmade Napkins, Now They’re All Sold

Things That Matter

A Photo Of This Sad, Sweet Old Lady Went Viral Because She Hadn’t Sold Any Of Her Handmade Napkins, Now They’re All Sold

Leo Brown / Facebook

The internet is a dark place —dark and full of terrors. But on a few rare occasions, it serves for good purposes. Last week, the pictures of a sweet indigenous woman, captured crying after she wasn’t able to sell her handmade napkins went viral. And in a deliciously gratifying turn of events, the next day her sales soared —and what’s more, people even asked to take pictures with her.

This sweet old lady was looking a little blue, so a stranger decided to ask what was wrong.

Doña Adela Vidales, a Purépecha woman from the town of Turícuaro, Michoacán, was sitting on the floor in downtown Uruapan looking sad, when Leopoldo Álvarez noticed her dispirited demeanor. Being a Purépecha himself, the man felt moved so he took a few sneaky pictures of her without being noticed, and approached the woman to ask what was wrong. “She looked sad. I took two photos of her back and I asked her why she was sad, and she told me that she hadn’t sold anything,” Álvarez told Mexican newspaper Milenio.

Leopoldo Álvarez took to Facebook to share the woman’s story.

Álvarez, who runs a catering business in Michoacán, posted the photos on Facebook, with the caption:  “Doña Adela was sad because she hadn’t sold her artisanal napkins, and I told her that I was going to promote her products on social media… I invite you all to buy from her, she works in downtown Uruapan…,” he wrote in Spanish.

The next day, Doña Adela’s napkins sold out.

Just a week after the photos went up on Facebook, Leopoldo’s post had garnered over 2,500 likes and 619 comments —the post had been shared more than 8,000 times! “I didn’t think it would have such reach,” he said.

After many followers asked him how they could reach Doña Adela, he went to Turícuaro to find her.

“I went back to see her and we spoke. She told me that the next day, on Sunday, she went to work and sold everything and even finished early… and it was curious,” he added, “because she doesn’t usually sell out so early. But she sold everything and there were even people who wanted to take pictures with her,” Álvarez said.

“I felt useful,” said Álvares, “I don’t care about becoming famous.”

Leopoldo explained that he feels happy about having helped Doña Adela, and when he saw her again, days later, she expressed how immensely grateful she was.  “I felt useful, and I think I did my part. People congratulate me, but I think anyone would do the same.”

Álvarez reiterated that when he posted the photos of her, that he only cared about helping Doña Adela sell the napkins she had  made by hand.

Despite the huge engagement his post had; now he sees that ‘likes’ and ‘shares’ aren’t enough —he wants this to become something that provides real support to Michoacán artisans. “A ‘like’ doesn’t symbolize a purchase, a ‘share’ doesn’t symbolize an order. People haven’t kept buying, and the intention is to help.” said Leopoldo. “I don’t care about becoming famous, I wanted to help her.”

Leopoldo shared Doña Adela’s grandson, Melitón’s phone number in his social media profiles, so that people who are interested in buying can reach them. The caterer says he wants to help artisans from his own hometown, Pamatácuaro, who make wooden spoons, molinillos, and woven baskets. “I’d like to benefit my community, the artisans, that was my intention with Doña Adela, because there are many more artisans like her who live off their sales.”

Don’t take away valuable business from indigenous artisans by buying imitations from big corporations.

Many stores like Urban Outfitters or Anthropologie, are taking valuable business away from actual indigenous artists and small businesses by making cheap knockoffs of their hand-made work. Support indigenous creativity, history, and legacy, and help create a much-needed economic boost in rural areas by shopping from small, authentic indigenous businesses, everywhere.