Fierce

A Venezolana Made A ‘Game Of Thrones’ Comic Starring Her Latina Mom And Latinas Can’t Stop Laughing

For eight straight seasons, the nerdiest of fans of the widely obsessed over Game of Thrones series have mulled over theories, conspiracy theories, Comic-Con outfits, and, often the most fun to see, fan drawings. While even the most impressive and realistic renditions of the characters of the series have managed to light us on fire like the breath of a Targaryen dragon, nothing has lit up the Latino fanbase of the series quite like the images created by a Venezuelan fan of the series.

Alie is a Venezuelan artist who draws comics and posts them on Instagram under the pen name @illustralie. She also does a lot of about her mom.

Like most of us, Alie’s work is often intrigued by el camino de la mamá and she’s depicted her own mother’s sense of humor and Latinidad in quiet a few of her illustrations.

With so much hype surrounding the new season of Game of Thrones, Alie’s latest piece comes in great timing.

@illustralie / Twitter

LOL watch out for spoilers!!

It even features the world’s sweetest version of the White Walker

(Which TBH anyone who saw season 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 and did NOT close their eyes at the sight of the blue-eyed Others know this is nearly damn impossible to do.)

And her bold Mom attacking a WW to get a sweater on it.

Which also TBH is all of us.

LOL and her mom even has classic GOT jokes.

Just really wish she had a spoiler about who that Night King is ya know?

But at least the WW gets some good sopa in the end.

‘Cause there’s nothing seriously better than when mama makes it.

“Sopita de mamá ????,” one user wrote in response to the comic’s joke.

Of course, Latino GOT fans are giving the best reactions to the post.

“Si las madres intervinieran en GOT jajajajajjaa,” one user wrote in response. Just about everyone agrees that their mom would do the same.

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Maluma Invited Fans To A Meet And Greet But Now It’s Being Called A Covid-19 Super Spreader Event

Entertainment

Maluma Invited Fans To A Meet And Greet But Now It’s Being Called A Covid-19 Super Spreader Event

Maluma is one of the world’s biggest pop stars, so it should be no surprise that when he invites fans to a meet-and-greet, thousands of people would show up.

And that’s exactly what happened at his latest meet-and-greet in Miami, which is now being called a potential Covid-19 super spreader event after police were forced to shut down the event since so few people were following health measures.

Maluma incited a mob of his fans at a Miami meet-and-greet.

If Maluma was in my neighborhood, I probably would have been the first in line to go to his meet-and-greet. But now, thanks to Covid, his massive fandom might just prove to be deadly, after fans gathered for a Miami event to promote his latest EP.

Papi Juancho took to Instagram to alert his fans that he’d be making an appearance at a gallery pop-up, making sure to include in parentheses: ‘Wear masks.’ As soon as he arrived, fans swarmed his car as he stood up through the sunroof to greet fans which were lined up for blocks.

He greeted around 160 fans outside the gallery, before they were let inside the gallery 10 at a time, where social distancing was enforced. But with more than 1,000 people still in line, the Miami Police Department had to step in to shut down the event, as it violated Covid-19 emergency orders.

“We don’t know why they canceled it, we’ve been here for three hours” a young fan told Telemundo Miami, adding that the line was “really long.”

Maluma was in Miami promoting his latest EP, 7DJ.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

Maluma, who’s promoting the recently released visual album “7 Días en Jamaica,” partnered with fellow Colombian artist Federico Uribe, who made art for the album using pieces of plastic. The artwork, which will be auctioned off with 100% of the proceeds going to environmental non-profits, was on display at the gallery

Maluma announced his EP last week on Instagram, sparking pregnancy rumors as he cuddled up to a woman’s stomach, which was scribed in marker with ‘#7DJ.’ 

‘It’s my sixth child… For the people who thought I was going to be a dad. This is my new baby, 7 Días En Jamaica. This is a project that I’ve been working on for a long time.’

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If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Culture

If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

So many of us have been moved the art of the late Frida Kahlo. Even in death she’s gone on to inspire entire generations with her Surrealist self-portraits, lush depictions of plant and animal life, and magical realist tableaux. Not to mention her incredible life story.

She also inspired future generations of artists, many of whom are alive today creating beautiful works of art. These are just a few of the artists who have similar techniques, subjects, and styles to Frida Kahlo that you’ll definitely love if you’re a fan of Frida Kahlo.

Maria Fragoso – Mexico City

Credit: Teach Me Sweet Things / Theirry Goldberg Gallery

Influenced by the style and narratives of Mexican surrealists and muralists, Maria Fragoso creates work that celebrates her Mexican culture, while also addressing notions of gender expression and queer identity. Her brightly colored canvases offer voyeuristic glimpses into intimate moments, with subjects engaging in acts that seem at once seductive and mischievous—often while gazing directly out at the viewer.

Recently featured in Forbes’s “30 Under 30” in the “Art and Style” category, the 25-year-old artist is quickly rising to prominence. Born and raised in Mexico City, Fragoso moved to Baltimore in 2015 to pursue her BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art. While in school, Fragoso was the recipient of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Fellowship at the Yale Norfolk School of Art. Since graduating, she has completed residencies at Palazzo Monti and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

Nadia Waheed – Austin, Texas

Credit: Message from Janus / Mindy Solomon Gallery

Born in Saudi Arabia to Pakistani parents, Austin, Texas–based artist Nadia Waheed explores notions of relocation, displacement, and vulnerability in her work. Her life-size figurative paintings are both allegorical and autobiographical—the female figures represent her own lived experiences, as well as the multifaceted identities of all women.

Rodeo Tapaya – Philippines

Credit: Nowhere Man / A3 Art Agency

Rodel Tapaya paints dreamlike, narrative works based on myths and folklore from his native Philippines. Drawing parallels between age-old fables and current events, Tapaya reimagines mythical tales by incorporating fragments of the present. “In some way, I realize that old stories are not just metaphors. I can find connections with contemporary time,” Tapaya said in a 2017 interview with the National Gallery of Australia. “It’s like the myths are poetic narrations of the present.”

While the content of Tapaya’s work is inspired by Filipino culture, his style and literary-based practice is heavily influenced by Mexican muralists and Surrealist painters such as José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and, of course, Frida Kahlo. Often working at a large scale, Tapaya has been commissioned to create several site-specific murals, including one for Art Fair Philippines in February 2020.

Leonor Fini – Buenos Aires

Credit: Les Aveugles / Weinstein Gallery

Long overlooked in favor of male Surrealists, Leonor Fini, a contemporary of Kahlo, was a pioneering 20th-century force. Known for having lived boldly, Fini is recognized for her unconventional lifestyle, theatrical personality, and avant-garde fashion sense. Born in Buenos Aires in 1907, Fini was raised by her mother in Trieste, Italy. She taught herself to paint and first exhibited her work at the age of 17.

Fini had one of her first solo exhibitions at age 25 with a Parisian gallery directed by Christian Dior. Her work was then included in the groundbreaking exhibition “Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism” at MoMA in 1936, while at the same time she had her first New York exhibition with Julien Levy Gallery. Today, Fini’s work is represented in many major public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Tate Modern in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice.

Ramon Alejandro – Miami

Credit: Eternal Life / Latino Art Core

José Ramón Díaz Alejandro, better known as Ramon Alejandro, paints idyllic still lifes of tropical fruits set in ethereal landscapes. The surrealistic compositions have a similar spirit to Kahlo’s less iconic but equally masterful still-life works

Coming from a long lineage of artists, Alejandro grew up with the artworks of his great-grandfather, grandfather, and uncle adorning the walls of his childhood home. After growing up in Havana, Alejandro was sent to live in Argentina in 1960 amidst political turmoil in Cuba, and has continued to live in exile since then.

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