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‘Black-ish’ Actress To Take On Beauty Industry With New Curly Haircare Line That Offers Cheap But Big Products

The Golden Globe-winning actress, Tracee Ellis Ross, is launching a haircare line for folks with 3B to 4C curls. As an Afro-Latinx with very thick 4C hair, I cannot be more excited for this. Most hair products are simply not made for black hair in general, but to have a dedicated line for coily hair is bound to be a game-changer. 

Our afro-textured hair is often considered a deviation from the “norm” of long, fine hair. In 2019, New York and California had to take extra precautions to protect natural textured hair by passing laws that ban discrimination against afro-textured, natural hair. Can you imagine the way your hair growing out of your head being perceived as so “unkempt,” “unclean,” and “undesirable,” that there is enough discrimination to warrant laws to outlaw said discrimination? Well, no more of that pelo malo nonsense.  

Rejoice because Miss Ross has got our backs now, too. Ross has become something of a cultural and fashion icon in her own right. She has never shied away from wearing her big, voluminous natural curls even when the look was “unpopular” to see in the mainstream. 

Tracee Ellis Ross bares it all in her new campaign.

Ross stripped down to nothing but the beautiful brown skin she was born in to announce the launch of Pattern. The clever slogan crowns Ross’ head of curls reading: sometimes it’s just all about the hair. She’s right, Diana Ross’ daughter is completely naked and your eye goes straight to her hair because it literally looks magnificent. 

“Thrilled to introduce PATTERN // my new haircare brand specifically for curly, coily, and tight textured hair,” Ross wrote on Instagram.

A dream come true.  

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DREAM COME TRUE ~ thanks for all the love

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Ross says she has spent 20 years dreaming about her own haircare line, 10 of those trying to get it made, and the past 2 working with scientists to develop the products. 

“Pattern Beauty is the result of 20 years of dreaming, 10 years in the making (I wrote my first brand pitch in 2008, right when girlfriends finished ) and 2 years of working with chemists. I’m so excited to share this with y’all,” she wrote. 

Who is Pattern for? 

Sorry, my non-3b to 4c friends but this line is just for us. We don’t get to feel special very often, please let us have this moment. I am sure you want to give Ross your money too but just watch “Black-ish” instead. 

“Pattern is here to empower and nourish curly, coily and tight-textured hair. 3b to 4c. The formulas are unique and packed with luscious & safe ingredients-trust me I know because my panel and I tried 74 different samples to get these 7 formulas for phase one,” Ross continued.

Now here is the gamechanger (for me at least).  

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LATE TEENS // EARLY TWENTIES – me #fbf

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She understands: we need so much more product than people with other hair textures. We need the whole bottle. Sometimes we even need two. Ross is promising larger quantities of conditioner and accessible pricing. 

Prices range from $9.00 – $42.00, while sizes range for 3-ounce bottles to 29-ounce bottles. Pattern will also include hair oil serums for $25, a $20 hair clip, and a $19 microfiber towel. 

“Pattern is for those of us who need more than a quarter size of the product. Large conditioner sizes that actually fulfill the unmet needs of our community. Accessible pricing because everyone should have access to their most beautiful hair in their own shower, and gorgeous packaging that conjures the legacy of our history and makes us all feel like the royalty that we are,” she announced. 

Mark your calendars, morenas. On September 9th, at exactly 9 AM EST, we are going to feel like royalty with giant elephant-sized bottles of conditioner made just for us. 

Tracee’s hair journey is what inspired the launch of Pattern.

Ross recently discussed how accepting her hair was profoundly intertwined with accepting herself. 

“I can literally chronicle my journey of self-acceptance through my journey with my hair,” she writes. “Growing up, society told me there was a right way to wear my hair and a right way to look. Those ideals didn’t match what I saw in the mirror, so I tried to beat my curls into submission —  putting body lotion in my hair, sleeping in rollers, blowouts, relaxers, texturizers, ponytails so tight they gave me a headache, and I even whipped out an iron (the kind you use for clothes) in an attempt to straighten it that way. ”  

The actress has clearly embraced her luscious locks since then. Ross’ visibility in the media is paramount to society accepting the wonderful, beautiful and inexplicable diversity of all features in humanity. 

Check out Pattern Beauty to learn more about Ross’ hair care line just for the curly-blessed.

Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

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Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

lizzobeeating / Instagram

There’s no denying it, Lizzo’s been having a great year, 2019 has definitely been good to her. Not a week goes by without us hearing something or another about the queen of self-love. The singer earned four VMA nominations this year, including best new artist, push artist of the year, best power anthem and song of the summer. She has a string of high profile celebs and personalities flooding her DMs and twitter feed, and before the decade draws to an end, she just landed the cover story of Vogue UK —Lizzo did THAT.

This year’s definitely got Lizzo feeling ‘good as hell’.

instagram @lizzobeeating

It’s been almost two years since Lizzo released her song “Truth Hurts,” and the singer skyrocketed up the charts and captivated the whole world with her positivity and fun energy this year. To end 2019 with a bang, Lizzo landed the cover of Vogue UK and to aptly quote her own hit, she’s looking “good as hell.”

Growing up, Lizzo recalls rarely —if at all— seeing women who looked like her in the media. 

twitter @lizzo 

The December issue of Vogue UK features the pop star clad in a glamorous Versace gown with feathered shoulders. The proud singer, happily tweeted out the cover photo this week. Lizzo told British Vogue just how much this cover story meant to her after growing up with hardly any images depicting women that looked like her in the media. 

“I would watch things on television and I would look at magazines and I would not see myself,” she told British Vogue. “When you don’t see yourself, you start to think something’s wrong with you. Then you want to look like those things and when you realize it’s a physical impossibility, you start to think, ‘What the fuck is wrong with me?’.” “I think that took a greater toll on me, psychologically, growing up than what anyone could have said to me.”

For all of us who’ve been starved for representation in fashion, this cover is a breath of fresh air.

twitter @bibbygregory

That’s why seeing Lizzo on the cover of British Vogue’s December issue—her first Vogue cover—in a plunging black couture gown, is such a deeply emotional experience for those of us who have rarely if ever seen bodies like ours, that don’t necessarily stick to the impossible “beauty norm,” represented in magazines. 

It’s a well known fact that magazines are often found guilty of extreme photoshop, which is why seeing Lizzo in her full glory is such a MOMENT.

@stretchmarkmami

What’s more, her cover is elevated, beautiful, fashionable and worthy of being seen. In the past —and perhaps still to this day, magazines have been guilty of hiding shapely bodies and airbrushing away their curves. But in this case British Vogue chose to acknowledge them instead. 

Plus-sized bodies covering Vogue have been rare—and have often been included as a token within groups of slimmer frames. Even Oprah reportedly slimmed down to a size 6 for her first Vogue cover in 1998; thankfully, her last appearance captured her in all her full-figured glory. But while many of us will be clamoring to get British Vogue’s December issue for its rare display of body positivity (the same quality many of us respond to in Lizzo, along with her undeniably infectious words), the entertainer insists it’s never been a gimmick.

“I’m not trying to sell you me, I’m trying to sell you, you.”

instagram @britishvogue

“Anybody that uses body positivity to sell something is using it for their personal gain. That’s just it,” she told Vogue. “We weren’t selling anything in the beginning. We were just selling ourselves and selling ourselves on the idea—selling ourselves on ourselves, you know?” “I’m not trying to sell you me,” she adds. “I’m trying to sell you, you.”

Whatever she’s selling, she can take our money.

twitter @setphanieYeboah

For those of us who’ve been starving for representation, the rise of Lizzo has been a healing balm. She’s a brown-skinned, big-bodied, unfiltered, unapologetic woman in a world that all too often asks us to apologize for not fitting its narrow definition of beauty, especially women (literally and figuratively).

Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

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Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

@recycle1az / Instagram

The world is in a dreadful mess if you haven’t noticed. And —surprise, surprise— a lot of it is caused by the fashion industry. Apparel and footwear production accounts for 8.1% of global greenhouse emissions —or as much as the total climate impact of the entire European Union. The current fast fashion “only wear it once” mentality is causing an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources. And a few brands are taking note of the magnitude of the problem and see an opportunity. 

Both Fashion and the food industries are greatly responsible for an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources.

twitter @seotaijilads

Analysts warn that the fashion market’s annual 5% growth is straining planetary resources “at an unprecedented level,” by raising production to more than 100 million tons by 2030. For those of us who don’t know, ’Fast Fashion’ can be defined as ‘the cheap, disposable clothing, made indiscriminately, imprudently and often without consideration for environmental and labor conditions’ by the companies we all love —like Zara, H&M, Forever 21 and Fashion Nova— it’s a disease and both the planet and the people are facing the consequences. 

Added on to the damage that fashion production causes, there’s the case of food production and waste. 

twitter @ajplus

Around the world, people eat around 100 billion bananas every year. That creates around 270 million tons of waste–from peels to stalks–which are often burned or left to rot. Crop burning pollutes the air, and rotting releases methane into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. But here’s where we have good news; a few masterminds of the sustainable fashion industry took into consideration the magnitude of this waste and saw an opportunity. 

Single-use plastics and discarded fishing nets were among the first materials to be recycled into luxury products, but now it’s food waste that’s getting the sustainable spin. 

instagram @veja

US designer Mara Hoffman crafts all her buttons from tree nuts, while Hugo Boss and Veja sell sneakers made from repurposed pineapple leaves and corn starch, and Italian start-up Orange Fiber makes silk from scraps of citrus peel which has been used for Salvatore Ferragamo’s slinky floral printed scarves and dresses. 

The true pioneer of sustainable —and luxury— fashion is Stella McCartney who launched her eponymous line in 2001. 

instagram @stellamccartney

As one of the industry’s most vocal champions of environmental issues, McCartney is a strong example of the commercial potential of sustainable, ethically minded businesses. Sustainability —and an ethical standpoint— shapes the company’s policies, its underlying business model and its brand message.

Stella McCartney opted out of using animal-derived materials such as leather, silk, wool, etc. for ethical reasons as well as for the environmental impact their production causes. 

instagram @stellamccartney

The environmentally conscious brand makes buttery vegan leathers out of mushrooms. For spring/summer 2019, McCartney offered gauzy vests and T-shirts crafted from vegan silk made from yeast, and leather trousers in earthy mustards and burgundy hues.

Food waste is definitely on-trend right now.

instagram @clos19official

The huge luxury conglomerate who owns brands like Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Fendi —to name a few—LVMH, has teamed up with London charity Refettorio Felix for their ‘wine and spirits platform Clos19’ and host super fancy “supper clubs” where stellar chefs serve up three-course dinners using only waste produce — tickets cost £90, and each event sells out almost instantly. 

It’s a movement happening across different lifestyle categories from dining to beauty and fashion. “Food waste is definitely trending right now,” says Lisa Carolan, founder of the first waste-free wellness resort Our Retreat, in Sardinia; she introduced a waste-free policy after discovering that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually. 

The growing demand for natural skincare and plastic-free packaging has seen the beauty industry wake up to waste too.

twitter @marieclaireuk

Earlier this year, The Body Shop unveiled a collection of cleansers and moisturizers crafted from organic, “ugly” carrots that are too crooked to be sold in supermarkets. UK beauty brand, Cowshed, makes its packaging from repurposed sugar cane while London-based brands UpCircle and MontaMonta have both partnered with coffee shops across the British capital to turn used coffee grounds into scrubs and serums that are sold at Cult Beauty and Liberty. 

Fashion brands will find that if they choose to use food waste, ‘The supply of material is plentiful.’ 

twitter @macrostar

Data proving that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually also predicts that the figure is expected to rise to 2.2 billion by 2025 —according to the United Nations. Other statistics say that one-third of the food grown or produced in the world is discarded. “The supply of material is plentiful,” says Tom Broughton, founder of London-based eyewear Cubitts and a pioneer in the design of sustainable eyewear. 

Cubitts produces opticals and sunglasses crafted from waste materials like corn husks and mushrooms. The specs even look like they’re made from wood, mais non, they’re made from corn starch. The brown finish is added from…wait for it… potatoes and coffee grounds. 

In recent years, as the fashion industry has started to acknowledge, and wake up to the impact it has on the planet —aka. being the second most polluting industry after oil production— sustainability has become a buzzword, and the only way out. It’s encouraging to see that brands are taking serious steps in innovation to mitigate their negative impact on the planet. And just as fashion brands and designers are opting to see the value in waste rather than the waste in it, consumers also need to take their share of responsibility and shop with awareness and ethics.