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The Best Tips For Darker Skin Tones That Will Give Your Melanin Lots Of Glow

When it comes to makeup, a lot of what we see in the media is still focused on lighter skin tones. Fortunately, this is starting to change and even some makeup companies have realized the demand for more variety in terms of products. Moreover, there’s a global movement to recognize the beauty of darker skin tones as more artists and influencers are embracing their natural skin.

Whether you are just starting to experiment with makeup or have already picked up plenty of looks here are a few tips for working with makeup on darker skin tones.

1. Don’t skip UV protection.

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Your skin is beautiful with or without a tan. However, it is important to use UV protection even if you are dark. When planning for a day in the sun, add a bit of sunscreen, or at least a foundation and lip balm that offer UV protection to your look. Not only will a little sunscreen protect you from dangerous skin cancer, but it will also keep your skin looking younger as you age.

2. Develop a solid routine.

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Dark skin has plenty of variety and reacts differently to various climates. Whether you need to moisturize on a regular basis or deal with excess oil, a good routine can help you avoid breakouts. And, of course, always remember to take your makeup off before going to bed no matter how tired you feel. Your skin will thank you.

3. Mind the undertones.

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Your skin may have yellow, olive or even reddish undertones. Understanding your undertones can help you select colors to either bring these out or keep them hidden.

4. Moisturizer is key.

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Dark skin can get ashy when it’s dry. This can be embarrassing especially if you live in a climate that you’re your skin doesn’t like because everyone will know when you need to moisturize.

5. Match your makeup to your personal style.

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Makeup can definitely be used to express your style and your individuality. If you love bright colors, you can certainly translate that into your night time, and even daytime, look.

6. Find the right shades.

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Finding the shades of foundation and even eyeshadow that compliment your skin tone can be a bit of a journey. Fortunately, once you find what works, you can use that as your framework for future looks.

7. Play with foundation.

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If you are blessed with clear skin, you may skimp on, or even skip foundation all together for certain daytime looks. On the other hand, you can also use foundation and powder to play up different parts of your face. Most experts recommend using a foundation that is two shades lighter than your natural skin tone.

8. Do some research.

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If you’re trying out something new, or if you’ve generally had trouble with matching makeup to your skin tone you’re in luck; there are several YouTube and Instagram influencers who specifically work with darker skin tones and offer tutorials. You can also ask a friend for help.

9. Make the most out of your concealer.

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While concealer is traditionally used to hide skin blemishes, it can also help make your eyes pop. Simply apply your favorite concealer under your eyes and to your eyebrows in a triangle

10. Makeup after contact lenses.

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This tip is universal but worth noting regardless of whether you are using contact lenses to help correct your vision or are opting for color contacts to make your eyes pop for a special occasion. Putting on your contacts at the last minute will inevitably lead to running makeup and possibly even mascara smudged contact lenses.

11. Balance your eyes and lips:

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Having both eye and lips pop can be overwhelming, which is why makeup artists focusing on one or the other. That doesn’t mean that your eyes can’t look stunning if you’re wearing red or purple lipstick, but having your eyes pink at the same time, can be a bit too much at best, and may leave you looking like a clown at worst. To make sure you aren’t overdoing it, stick to accentuating either your eyes or your lips- especially if you are a beginner.

12. A touch of bronzer gives a bright, sun-kissed look.

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Adding a little bit of bronzer can help your skin look fresh and sun-kissed even if your skin is naturally dark. Fortunately, there are several types of bronzers on the market that have been designed for darker skin. The key is remembering to blend the bronzer with your foundation for a smooth finish.

13. Add primer to enhance your eyeshadow.

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Whether you are going for a relaxed look or want to attract attention to your eyes, applying primer before your eyeshadow can help ensure that every shade looks its best.

14. Go darker with blush.

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If you have darker skin, you’ll need a darker blush color to get your “rosy” cheeks. You can also pay attention to your skin’s undertones and complement for a natural blush or contrast for a more dramatic look.

15. Find your lipstick shades.

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You can pull off almost any lipstick including red in the right shade. However, most experienced makeup artists will warn you away from frosty or glossy shades. For a fun and flirty daytime look, opt for chocolate, or peach shades.  For a more adventurous look, try gold, berry, or even purple.

16. Highlight your brows.

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This is especially important if you have darker skin but lighter hair and eyebrows. Having your eyebrows disappear while the rest of your face is accentuated with makeup will definitely earn you a few questioning looks.

17. Combine colors to make your eyes pop.

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Most expert makeup looks use several colors. Adding a light color around the edge of your eyes can make you look bright-eyed. Meanwhile adding a similar shade to the edge of your eyebrow can make your eyes look larger.

18. Take time to experiment.

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Most people who are “good at makeup” have spent time experimenting with different shades, colors, and techniques to find out what works- and what doesn’t. Giving yourself time to mess around with your makeup will not only sharpen your skills but can also lead to you discovering that a specific shade or color looks amazing with your skin tone. And, of course, you can always get ideas for your next party look or Halloween costume.

19. Keep your makeup supplies clean.

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Over time, your skin oil, dead skin cells, and extra pigment can build up on your makeup brush causing it to be less effective and leading to unpleasant breakouts. Meanwhile, unclean eyeshadow brushes can lead to eye infections. As a best practice, clean your brushes at least every few weeks or every four months if you only use makeup once in a while. Your skin and your eyes will thank you!

Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

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Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

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There’s no denying it, Lizzo’s been having a great year, 2019 has definitely been good to her. Not a week goes by without us hearing something or another about the queen of self-love. The singer earned four VMA nominations this year, including best new artist, push artist of the year, best power anthem and song of the summer. She has a string of high profile celebs and personalities flooding her DMs and twitter feed, and before the decade draws to an end, she just landed the cover story of Vogue UK —Lizzo did THAT.

This year’s definitely got Lizzo feeling ‘good as hell’.

instagram @lizzobeeating

It’s been almost two years since Lizzo released her song “Truth Hurts,” and the singer skyrocketed up the charts and captivated the whole world with her positivity and fun energy this year. To end 2019 with a bang, Lizzo landed the cover of Vogue UK and to aptly quote her own hit, she’s looking “good as hell.”

Growing up, Lizzo recalls rarely —if at all— seeing women who looked like her in the media. 

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The December issue of Vogue UK features the pop star clad in a glamorous Versace gown with feathered shoulders. The proud singer, happily tweeted out the cover photo this week. Lizzo told British Vogue just how much this cover story meant to her after growing up with hardly any images depicting women that looked like her in the media. 

“I would watch things on television and I would look at magazines and I would not see myself,” she told British Vogue. “When you don’t see yourself, you start to think something’s wrong with you. Then you want to look like those things and when you realize it’s a physical impossibility, you start to think, ‘What the fuck is wrong with me?’.” “I think that took a greater toll on me, psychologically, growing up than what anyone could have said to me.”

For all of us who’ve been starved for representation in fashion, this cover is a breath of fresh air.

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That’s why seeing Lizzo on the cover of British Vogue’s December issue—her first Vogue cover—in a plunging black couture gown, is such a deeply emotional experience for those of us who have rarely if ever seen bodies like ours, that don’t necessarily stick to the impossible “beauty norm,” represented in magazines. 

It’s a well known fact that magazines are often found guilty of extreme photoshop, which is why seeing Lizzo in her full glory is such a MOMENT.

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What’s more, her cover is elevated, beautiful, fashionable and worthy of being seen. In the past —and perhaps still to this day, magazines have been guilty of hiding shapely bodies and airbrushing away their curves. But in this case British Vogue chose to acknowledge them instead. 

Plus-sized bodies covering Vogue have been rare—and have often been included as a token within groups of slimmer frames. Even Oprah reportedly slimmed down to a size 6 for her first Vogue cover in 1998; thankfully, her last appearance captured her in all her full-figured glory. But while many of us will be clamoring to get British Vogue’s December issue for its rare display of body positivity (the same quality many of us respond to in Lizzo, along with her undeniably infectious words), the entertainer insists it’s never been a gimmick.

“I’m not trying to sell you me, I’m trying to sell you, you.”

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“Anybody that uses body positivity to sell something is using it for their personal gain. That’s just it,” she told Vogue. “We weren’t selling anything in the beginning. We were just selling ourselves and selling ourselves on the idea—selling ourselves on ourselves, you know?” “I’m not trying to sell you me,” she adds. “I’m trying to sell you, you.”

Whatever she’s selling, she can take our money.

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For those of us who’ve been starving for representation, the rise of Lizzo has been a healing balm. She’s a brown-skinned, big-bodied, unfiltered, unapologetic woman in a world that all too often asks us to apologize for not fitting its narrow definition of beauty, especially women (literally and figuratively).

Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

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Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

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The world is in a dreadful mess if you haven’t noticed. And —surprise, surprise— a lot of it is caused by the fashion industry. Apparel and footwear production accounts for 8.1% of global greenhouse emissions —or as much as the total climate impact of the entire European Union. The current fast fashion “only wear it once” mentality is causing an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources. And a few brands are taking note of the magnitude of the problem and see an opportunity. 

Both Fashion and the food industries are greatly responsible for an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources.

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Analysts warn that the fashion market’s annual 5% growth is straining planetary resources “at an unprecedented level,” by raising production to more than 100 million tons by 2030. For those of us who don’t know, ’Fast Fashion’ can be defined as ‘the cheap, disposable clothing, made indiscriminately, imprudently and often without consideration for environmental and labor conditions’ by the companies we all love —like Zara, H&M, Forever 21 and Fashion Nova— it’s a disease and both the planet and the people are facing the consequences. 

Added on to the damage that fashion production causes, there’s the case of food production and waste. 

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Around the world, people eat around 100 billion bananas every year. That creates around 270 million tons of waste–from peels to stalks–which are often burned or left to rot. Crop burning pollutes the air, and rotting releases methane into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. But here’s where we have good news; a few masterminds of the sustainable fashion industry took into consideration the magnitude of this waste and saw an opportunity. 

Single-use plastics and discarded fishing nets were among the first materials to be recycled into luxury products, but now it’s food waste that’s getting the sustainable spin. 

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US designer Mara Hoffman crafts all her buttons from tree nuts, while Hugo Boss and Veja sell sneakers made from repurposed pineapple leaves and corn starch, and Italian start-up Orange Fiber makes silk from scraps of citrus peel which has been used for Salvatore Ferragamo’s slinky floral printed scarves and dresses. 

The true pioneer of sustainable —and luxury— fashion is Stella McCartney who launched her eponymous line in 2001. 

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As one of the industry’s most vocal champions of environmental issues, McCartney is a strong example of the commercial potential of sustainable, ethically minded businesses. Sustainability —and an ethical standpoint— shapes the company’s policies, its underlying business model and its brand message.

Stella McCartney opted out of using animal-derived materials such as leather, silk, wool, etc. for ethical reasons as well as for the environmental impact their production causes. 

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The environmentally conscious brand makes buttery vegan leathers out of mushrooms. For spring/summer 2019, McCartney offered gauzy vests and T-shirts crafted from vegan silk made from yeast, and leather trousers in earthy mustards and burgundy hues.

Food waste is definitely on-trend right now.

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The huge luxury conglomerate who owns brands like Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Fendi —to name a few—LVMH, has teamed up with London charity Refettorio Felix for their ‘wine and spirits platform Clos19’ and host super fancy “supper clubs” where stellar chefs serve up three-course dinners using only waste produce — tickets cost £90, and each event sells out almost instantly. 

It’s a movement happening across different lifestyle categories from dining to beauty and fashion. “Food waste is definitely trending right now,” says Lisa Carolan, founder of the first waste-free wellness resort Our Retreat, in Sardinia; she introduced a waste-free policy after discovering that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually. 

The growing demand for natural skincare and plastic-free packaging has seen the beauty industry wake up to waste too.

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Earlier this year, The Body Shop unveiled a collection of cleansers and moisturizers crafted from organic, “ugly” carrots that are too crooked to be sold in supermarkets. UK beauty brand, Cowshed, makes its packaging from repurposed sugar cane while London-based brands UpCircle and MontaMonta have both partnered with coffee shops across the British capital to turn used coffee grounds into scrubs and serums that are sold at Cult Beauty and Liberty. 

Fashion brands will find that if they choose to use food waste, ‘The supply of material is plentiful.’ 

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Data proving that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually also predicts that the figure is expected to rise to 2.2 billion by 2025 —according to the United Nations. Other statistics say that one-third of the food grown or produced in the world is discarded. “The supply of material is plentiful,” says Tom Broughton, founder of London-based eyewear Cubitts and a pioneer in the design of sustainable eyewear. 

Cubitts produces opticals and sunglasses crafted from waste materials like corn husks and mushrooms. The specs even look like they’re made from wood, mais non, they’re made from corn starch. The brown finish is added from…wait for it… potatoes and coffee grounds. 

In recent years, as the fashion industry has started to acknowledge, and wake up to the impact it has on the planet —aka. being the second most polluting industry after oil production— sustainability has become a buzzword, and the only way out. It’s encouraging to see that brands are taking serious steps in innovation to mitigate their negative impact on the planet. And just as fashion brands and designers are opting to see the value in waste rather than the waste in it, consumers also need to take their share of responsibility and shop with awareness and ethics.