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Studies Say Latina Moms Struggle With Pregnancies In Ways That Are Unique To Themselves In Early Stages

By Diana R. Diaz

Welcome to motherhood! Whether you had a difficult pregnancy and delivery or not, you’ve officially crossed over into undeniably the best and hardest years of your life. As a mother myself (of boy-girl twins), I can tell you with all certainty, that nothing, I mean nothing, no book, no blog, no video, can adequately prepare you to ‘do motherhood’ the right way. Simply stated, there is no right way. Our bodies are different, our tolerance levels are different. 

I had a beautiful pregnancy and delivery but struggled tremendously in the weeks and months that followed. Sleep deprivation was harsh and my postpartum depression was oh-so-real. Most of which was triggered by the cultural pressure I felt to breastfeed when my body simply couldn’t. Inevitably I felt like a failure. Truth is, I tried. I tried a lot.  But with every attempt, I felt my mental and physical state take a toll for the worse. It led me into a very dark and lonely place. I share all about it in this video.  In retrospect, I realize that it didn’t have to be this extreme. And while there’s definitely no book with all the magic answers, here are my 3 Survival Tips for New Latina Moms to help you better cope with the unexpected twists and turns of early motherhood. 

1. Don’t Compare Yourself 

zianiarubi/ Instagram

Chances are, you’re exhausted, overwhelmed and quite vulnerable. And since this is your first time having a baby, you have no real measure or point of reference on how early motherhood ‘should’ be. With all this said, it can be easy to fall victim to the comparison game. You might’ve heard that your prima breastfed like a champ; that your tia used a specific baby formula that she swore by; or that your friend willingly and excitedly took 5 years off work to thrive as a stay at home mom. With the constant influx of information, you have to pause and remind yourself that your experiences are unique. As a new mom, you must harness the little energy you have and channel in the areas in your life that really need it. This way, your wellness remains a consistent priority. So next time, instead of thinking of how ‘fulana’ did something a certain way; pause and redirect your thoughts to: 

“Have I taken a shower today?” 

“Have I taken a few whole deep breaths today?”

“Have I looked in the mirror and told myself, wow good job today?” 

2. Breastfeed or Not – YOU Decide 

olaiasusperregi / Instagram

Listen, this isn’t easy. I personally wanted to breastfeed and dreamed of it being such a beautiful and painless experience. I went to all the classes and told myself, I will be like that woman smiling while simultaneously breastfeeding her newborn twins in the cover of a motherhood magazine. None of which actually happened because I soon learned I had hyper-sensitive nipples which made breastfeeding feel like death. Family and friends would kindly but firmly insist I keep trying. As a result, I fell into a feeling of deep sorrow. Ladies, don’t do this. YOU know your body better than anyone. If you are in unruly pain and you know in your gut that your attempts to breastfeed is deteriorating your mental and physical health, please listen to your body, even if it goes against what your mom, suegra or partner may think. Conversely, if you want to breastfeed and feel pressured to stop when you really don’t want to, listen to your gut. It’s important to note that all new moms struggle with breastfeeding. Some moms are total naturals. Other moms struggle a little in the beginning and soon get the hang of it. There are also a number of resources to help with breastfeeding and maternal wellness. My point isn’t to discourage breastfeeding, my point is to encourage self-awareness. 

3. Prioritize Self-Care

In the early months of motherhood, it’s easy to forget to think about yourself, or spending time away from your baby. For some, especially those part of the Latinx culture, this can feel like an absolute “sin”. Regardless, prioritizing self-care is vital to maintaining your mental and physical health. Self-care means different things to different people. Here are some easy ways you can prioritize self-care during early motherhood: 

  • Have a help plan. Yes, this means you should ask for help! Identify 2-3 friends and/or family members that can come and alternate once a week to help you with cleaning, cooking or babysitting while you do some self-care (not to be confused with friends and family that visit to meet the baby). 
  • If you can, hire help to clean and/or cook 
  • Take an extra-long hot shower with your favorite music on full blast 
  • Gym or yoga session once a week
  • Go for a long walk around the block with or without the baby
  • Go for a fast-food run and eat it in your car 
  • Sleep – preferably in a separate room or at a nearby friend’s house 
  • Say no to what doesn’t feel right in your gut 
  • Watch a feel-good movie 
  • Enjoy a pedicure or an actual body massage 
  • A quick drive to your favorite coffee place 

*shout out to my RAWW IG community for sharing their early motherhood self-care activities. 

Follow us on IG at @therawwnetwork 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

People Are Sharing How They Reached The $100K Ceiling

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People Are Sharing How They Reached The $100K Ceiling

Hitting that $100K ceiling might seem impossible if you’re a woman, particularly one in a certain field. Fortunately, Reddit is a fountain of financial advice, and men and women are sharing the ways in which they make $100K+ a year.

From improving a teacher’s salary to growing incoming as an artist, it’s all here!

Check the bits of advice out below!

“Programmer… took me 1.5 years after graduating college . But I am very lucky that my company is very high paying most programmers don’t make 100k+ for a while.”- Dangerous-Abalone381

“Really? Are you Front-end, back-end, or full stack? I was always under the impression that programmers/software engineers make a ton of money. Or is a programmer and software engineer different?!”- hoytscher

“Do you think people interested in transitioning to tech need to do a BS or would a boot camp suffice if they already have a BA and experience in other fields? Do you think programming gives good work life balance and salary?

I’m a teacher looking to move for better salary ($70k+) and decent work life balance and it seems like tech is recommended repeatedly.”- SnackHardNapHard

“I’ve been a programmer for 5 years and am only making ~$45k. Granted I did start out very slowly just doing a small amount of programming as part of my main job but I’m expecting to become a full fledged software developer this year.”- wolf_kisses

“I’m a social worker and never expected to make this salary. I worked in hospitals for a few years to get experience and now I take travel contracts. Similar to travel nursing but for social work.”- MurielFinster

“I started making 100k in medical social work after I passed my LCSW exam. Never thought it would be possible in this field.”-OEBmom

“oh wow, this is very cool. did not know you could do travel contracts. have been debating getting my master’s in social work, but am terrified of the debt. how long did you work in hospitals? what age did you start?”- losergoo

“I watch and manage high voltage power transmission lines for renewable energy sources in West Texas.

I got this job by being in the Navy for a number of years as a power plant operator, then becoming a nuclear plant operator, then going to college and dropping out, then getting really lucky. All in all, I hit 100k salary after working in the industry for just about 10 years.”- Sand_Dargon

“I’m an in house lawyer at an investment bank. I was 25 when I was first hired as a first year associate at a big law firm and started making $160,000 a year. 2 years later I hit $200,000. Those who work in the corporate sector, whether it’s consulting, finance, or law easily make over $100k. The problem is that in the big cities- NYC, LA, SF, etc. the housing is so expensive that even that doesn’t go very far if you have student loans.”- IwastesomuchtimeonAB

“I graduated in 2008 so I came out making $160k. Then my whole class got laid off and I went to making $70k. It’s been 13 years and I STILL don’t make as much money as I made the day I left law school. 2008 was rough man.”-Cat_With_The_Fur

“Data analyst

I’ve been out of undergrad for 13 years, but I worked retail for a bit and did grad school. I started in this sort of career pathway in 2014 and just hit 6 figures this year, so about 7 years in this industry.

My first DA-related job paid 42k/yr. Over the next few years I went from 42->44->50->52->75 (promotion to “senior” analyst) ->77->80->83->100 (same title, new company)”- PressureAwkward

“I also work in data and had an untraditional path to it. I graduated undergrad in 2013 and grad school at the end of 2018, and hit 6 figures around 1.5 years after grad school. I live in a very high cost of living city so that affected things as well.”- rlf923

“I’m also in Data Analytics, and it took 4 years after undergrad to make 6 figures. I studied Economics. My starting salary was $44k, and I received pay increases of about 25% annually until my salary was $104k. I was in a development program with a company, and all the raises were automatic except the last one. I’ve since moved, but my salary in the new position (also analytics) is $100k in a much lower cost of living area.”- kelsitear

“I work in the fashion industry as a designer and stylist. I’m lucky enough to be in the more high-profile side of things. It only took me two years to get to that point, I happened to just work on peojects within that kind of wage range and went from there.”-RosesAndPoinsettias

“I was an assistant fashion designer before the pandemic and lost my job. This gives me hope that the fashion industry will open up more opportunities in the future for me to get into it again.”- psychadelicamanic

“Likewise. I work at a Project Manager for a large insurance company. Took me 10 years after undergrad to hit the 100k mark (with bonus). Did Army for 4 years and when I transitioned out, had to start at a more entry level position (With a pay cut). Went from 55k to 98k in 5 years, and 4 different positions. Biggest benefit of the army, no student debt and good starting salary.”- mgmsupernova

“Set Decorator. (Interior designer for movies) Started as a PA, moved to set dresser, and finally to the head of the decoration department. PA is minimum wage, but as you work up the wages of course go up. I think it took me about 4 years to get to the 100000 a year mark. And of course, income fluctuates by show contract. None of us in the industry made as much money in 2020, for example, with the shutdowns.”- textilesandtrim

“People at salons can make a ton of money. I work at a nail salon part-time and I can make upwards of 300 plus tips a day. I made over 300 yesterday and about 60 in tips, which is very low IMO. I just had low quality clients (not a high service amount and low tips).

I always imagined hair salons being in even more than that. Cut and color ranges from 60 to what, 400 bucks? If you are willing to grind and build up your rapport, you can make a great living.”- TakethThyKnee

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A Michigan Woman Accidentally Glued Her Eye Shut After Mistaking Nail Glue For Eye Drops

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A Michigan Woman Accidentally Glued Her Eye Shut After Mistaking Nail Glue For Eye Drops

She’s no Gorilla Glue Girl but you can call her lucky!

Yacedrah Williams, of Michigan, is putting glue back in the headlines again after she accidentally reached for nail adhesive instead of her eye drops. Fortunately, after a frightening experience, she was able to recover and maintain her eyesight.

Williams made the shocking mistake last Thursday after experiencing dry eyes.

Williams mistook a glue meant to fix broken fingernails for the lubricating eye drops she typically uses for her contact lenses, according to WXYZ. In an interview with the local Detroit station, Williams explained that after falling asleep with her contacts in, she woke up in the middle of the night with dry eyes. Feeling groggy, she reached for her purse where she stored her eye drops, and accidentally retrieved a bottle of nail glue. It wasn’t until the glue went into her eye that Williams realized she’d reached for the wrong bottle.

“I was like, ‘Oh my goodness!'” Williams told the outlet. “It dropped in my eye and I tried to wipe it away.”

However, she was too late. Williams realized her eye had glued shut. “It sealed my eyes shut,” Williams commented. “I just started throwing cold water, and I was trying to pull my eyes apart but couldn’t. It was completely shut.”

Panicked and alarmed she called for her husband to call 911.

Williams immediately went to the hospital where doctors managed to open her eye and remove the glue which had fallen on her contact lens. Williams did lose some of her eyelashes but she can still be fine.

“They said that actually, the contacts saved my vision,” Williams explained to WXYZ. “They had to pull on it and flip the top of my lid.”

Count it as a lesson learned however, Williams said that after the horrifying incident she is committed to “never” putting her eye drops and nail glue in the same place again. In fact, she remarked, “I don’t think I’ll even have nail glue anymore.”

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