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The Due Dates For These Pregnant Women Of Color From Chicago’s Southside Have Passed

When white women go missing, it makes national news for weeks. When black or brown women go missing, it’s a different story. National media hardly takes notice when crimes against minority low-income women, unless it reveals a pattern. Such is the case in Chicago where a disturbing trend has become very apparent, and there’s no way of turning a blind eye now.

There are three women in Chicago’s Southside that have gone missing within months of each other. Two of them were pregnant at the time.

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According to news reports, two of the women were pregnant when they went missing, and have now passed their due date. The other woman is the mom of an 11-year-old son.

The first woman to go missing was 27-year-old Kierra Coles.

Twitter/@DanaRebikWGN, @todaytrail

Police say she went missing on Oct. 2, 2018. Coles was also three months pregnant at that time, which means her due has come and gone, and there’s still no news of her whereabouts.

“Please do not give up, because I’m not,” Kierra’s father, Joseph Coles on May 5, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Officials are offering a reward of $46,500 for information that leads to her recovery.

Coles worked in the U.S. Post Office, and they have contributed to the reward fund.

If you have information, police ask to call 312-747-8274.

On April 23, 19-year-old Marlen Ochoa-Uriostegui went missing. She was 9-months pregnant at the time.

Twitter/@HijaDeMiMadre3

The scary aspect to the case with Ochoa-Uriostegui is that she went missing on the same day that was supposed to be Coles due date. That coincidence is way too strong, and it has to be considered by police.

According to a CBS report, Yovani Lopez — her husband — Ochoa-Uriostegui was seen leaving her school and was supposed to pick up her 3-year-old son, but she never arrived.

For information on her whereabouts, people should call Chicago police special victims unit at 312-747-8274.

The latest missing case is that of 43-year-old Chaunti Bryla who went missing on March 7.

Twitter/@RevJJackson

While Bryla’s story doesn’t exactly fit the profiles of the other two women, she also went missing under bizarre circumstances. The mother of an 11-year-old son had just returned from the grocery store, but for some reason never put the groceries away. Her aunt said, according to WGN-TV, that she ran off and didn’t explain why. Even more strange is the fact that someone took out money out of her bank account from numerous locations.

Again, people are urged to call 911 or 312-747-8274 for any information about Bryla.

El Chapo Will Spend The Rest Of His Life Behind Bars But It’s What He Told The Judge That Everyone Is Talking About

Things That Matter

El Chapo Will Spend The Rest Of His Life Behind Bars But It’s What He Told The Judge That Everyone Is Talking About

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A federal judge in Brooklyn, N.Y., has sentenced drug kingpin Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán to a term of life in prison without the possibility of parole plus 30 years for his role in leading Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel. A life sentence was mandatory; U.S. prosecutors had asked that three decades be added onto Guzmán’s punishment.

The sentence also includes a multibillion-dollar financial penalty for the wealthy drug dealer.

The former drug lord was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years.

Credit: @KCRG / Twitter

A federal jury convicted Guzmán in February, finding him guilty of a raft of serious charges, from drug crimes to a murder conspiracy. His conviction included 10 counts of crimes such as narcotics trafficking, using a firearm in drug crimes and money laundering.

The 62-year-old former drug lord was extradited from his native Mexico to the US in January 2017. The terms of his extradition included a pledge that US authorities would not seek the death penalty.

The drug kingpin has repeatedly made headlines during his criminal career — first for the vast power he ruthlessly amassed and later for his seeming ability to break out of any prison in Mexico. In 2015, he escaped from a maximum security prison for the second time, after spending more than a decade eluding Mexican authorities. He lived outside the law for an additional six months, before he was captured in a high-profile operation in early 2016.

He’s also been ordered to pay more than $12 billion for his negative impacts on the country.

Drug kingpin El Chapo was ordered to forfeit more than $12.6 billion in ill-gotten drug money today. Many are already coming out with ideas on hote government should best spend that money.

While others are pointing out the irony in the government taking drug money as if it was simply taking its cut.

El Chapo’s attorney reiterated his call for a new trial over alleged misconduct by jurors.

This case was simply an inquisition. It was a show trial, and how it ended is exactly perfect for that description,” defense attorney Jeffrey Lichtman said. He said the government’s witnesses had included “lunatics and sociopaths and psychopaths” and that “up to five jurors broke the law — violated the law while they were judging Mr. Guzmán for crimes.”

After Guzmán was convicted, his defense team said the trial was tainted, claiming that members of the jury had ignored the judge’s orders not to read about the trial outside of court proceedings.

Guzmán plans to appeal, Lichtman said.

People were anxiously waiting to see if Guzmán would speak at his sentencing.

El Chapo spoke publicly for the first time since his conviction on Wednesday, complaining to a judge that his incarceration at a Manhattan lockup has been absolute “torture” before being sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years.

“I’ve been forced to drink unsanitary water. I’ve been denied access to fresh air and sunlight. The only sunlight I have in my cell comes through in the air vent,” the 62-year-old convicted drug kingpin told Brooklyn federal Judge Brian Cogan ahead of his sentencing.

Guzmán concluded his lengthy remarks by saying, “The United States is no better than any other corrupt country that you don’t respect.”

So where will El Chapo likely be spending the rest of his life?

Since he was sentenced to life, El Chapo will likely be serving that sentence in just one facility – the supermax prison just outside of Florence, Colorado. That is, of course, as long as he doesn’t successfully escape…again.

Many were just counting down the weeks or months until his third escape.

Some on Twitter pointed out that he’s already evaded authorities bascially four times now and made two high-profile escapes, including from a supposed supermax prison facility in Mexico.

Many are questioning how long it will take him and his Sinoaloa cartel to break him out of his cell in Colorado…

READ: Federal Jury Finds Drug Lord ‘El Chapo’ Guilty On All 10 Counts, Faces Life In Prison

This New Facility Cost $12 Million And It’s All Designed To Stop Rampant Avocado Theft

Culture

This New Facility Cost $12 Million And It’s All Designed To Stop Rampant Avocado Theft

avocadosfrommexico / Instagram

So avocado theft is one of the reasons that our beloved aguacate has been getting more and more expensive. According to Mexican authorities, the industry loses more than 12 tons of avocados to theft each day! That’s a lot of missed guacamole potential.

So together with the USDA, one Mexican group is creating a new facility and identifying new shipping routes to help cut these losses which are spiraling out of control.

Avocado growers have teamed up to build a facility that helps prevent theft.

Credit: @poandpo / Twitter

The absolutely depressing rise in avocado prices has left many of us nearly penniless but our problems pale in comparison to those being faced by the agricultural industry in Mexico.

Each and every day nearly 12 tons of avocados are stolen between the orchards and packing plants.

Between 2017 and 2019, Mexico reported 440 avocado theft investigations, and because Mexican-grown avocados made up 78 percent of the U.S. market last year, this spells trouble Stateside as well. Producers lose an average of four truckloads of avocados per day because of organized crime intervention. The majority of Mexican avocados that make their way to the U.S. come from the state of Michoacan, in a city called Uruapan, which accounts for 92 percent of Mexico’s avocado production last year,

I mean, apparently, avocado theft is a legit thing.

Credit: @jckichen / Twitter

And we’re not talking about shoving that $1.99 avocado in your pocket at the supermarket or “forgetting to pay” for a few that may have fallen into your purse.

Back in 2017, three men in California were arrested on suspicion of grand theft of avocados after the disappearance of $300,000 worth of the creamy fruit.

Police believe the men were stealing and selling avocados to unsuspecting customers for at least several months. 

The new $12 million facility is meant to finally address the issue of widespread theft.

A new $12 million facility will be built; a venture between the Association of Export Producers and Packers of Avocado from Mexico (APEAM), the Mexican Department of Agriculture and Agrarian Development (SADER), and also house the local offices for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Casa APEAM, as the facility is called, will also be part of Mexican officials new strategy to find safer export routes for avocados out of Mexico.

Silvano Aureoles, the governor of Michoacán, said he is working with avocado producers to plot new trucking routes to avoid the theft of trucks and merchandise. Part of these new actions could be exporting the avocados from the Port of Lázaro Cárdenas instead of the Port of Manzanillo, putting surveillance cameras on the road to Lázaro Cárdenas and increasing surveillance of truck shipments out of Michoacán.

And this news couldn’t come soon enough because prices for avocados continue to skyrocket!

Credit: @wdsu / Twitter

Avocado prices have been soaring recently, with a recent report revealing that the national price of Hass avocados has risen by 93 cents since last year.

On the wholesale side (think restaurants, markets), last year a 25-pound box cost $37 but that price has risen to $89 in 2019. That’s a huge and unfortunate increase for lovers of aguacate.

READ: 24 Ways To Use Avocado That Aren’t Guacamole

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