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This Mexican-American’s Tweet Went Viral For Repping Their Culture And Non-Binary Gender Expression

Charlie Peña is an 18-year-old non-binary Mexican-American in Houston, Texas who is showing the world how to own your identity, unapologetically. The Cypress Falls High School senior shared photos of a magnificent Mexican dress they* got at the swap meet and people are living. Peña spoke to mitú about the response the tweet has received and the validation they hope others like them get from seeing their tweet.

*Peña asked mitú to use their preferred pronouns they/their/them for the story.

This is Charlie Peña with best friend and prom date Jenna.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Charlie Peña

“My original date could not make it so my best friend, Jenna, did a really cute proposal for me. I’m obsessed with RuPaul so it was cute,” Peña told mitú. “We were supposed to take pictures with our prom group but took so long to get ready. We ended up having to eat dinner at Taco Bell, which was totally fine.”

Peña recently went viral on Twitter with an unapologetic, non-binary, Chicanx pride post for prom.


Peña told mitú that they only recently started to use the term non-binary to express their gender identity. They are still getting used to the term but they feel much more comfortable with it now then late last year when they first started to use the term.

But what does non-binary mean? Don’t worry. Peña has an explanation.

CREDIT: Women’s History Month / GIPHY

“Being non-binary means that I do not identify myself with the male/female binary. I am genderfluid, which means that my gender identity varies over time,” Peña told mitú. “I don’t conform with a certain set of pronouns, either. She/They/He, I don’t mind. However, that doesn’t mean that other people who identify as non-binary feel the same way. It all depends on the person and what they’re comfortable with.”

Peña also made an impact by channeling their Mexican culture via their prom dress which they got at a swap meet.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Charlie Peña

“A lot of kids at my school make fun of it for being ‘ghetto’ or ‘too chunti.’ I like to go because there’s a lot to look at, and honestly I can’t find good quality huaraches anywhere else,” Peña told mitú. “I remember walking around with my mom looking for a fruit stand and seeing the full dress on a mannequin. I looked at my mom and I told her, ‘That’s it, ese es mi vestido.’ I tried it on and I knew it was the one. I bought it on the spot.”

Peña admits that some people questioned whether it was a good idea to wear that dress to prom. Peña responded with a resounding “sí.”

CREDIT: Courtesy of Charlie Peña

And for Peña, it was all about owning up to their culture and loving everything that makes them them.

Although there are always haters, Peña garnered lots of support for her tweet.


Peña told mitú that they were surprised at all the positive responses they got for their tweet. As for the occasional haters, they pay them no mind because they say they know their worth, their value, and it took them too long to get to the level of confidence they have to let some salty strangers bring them down.

Seriously, people could not get enough of Peña’s unapologetic proclamation to the Twitterverse.


“[I’m] genuinely surprised more than anything,” they told mitú about their tweet going viral. “I hadn’t been feeling my best that day, so the responses were really reassuring.”

“I hope those like me can see me and feel represented in some way,” Peña told mitú.


Peña knows what it is like to not see yourself represented in media as non-binary and hopes that their tweet can help others find that validation.

Peña’s choice of dress is all about them showcasing what they find beautiful.


“I find beauty in tradition. Although I loved the idea of getting super glam in a ball gown, it’s not really me. I like to honor my culture when it comes to events like this. We are living in times where our political climate is making it really difficult for Latinxs,” Peña told mitú. We are stigmatized in the media by our president. … We are people that deserve respect. By wearing the traditional dress that I did, I felt as if I was making that statement. I represent my people and our customs to make sure that we are seen.”


READ: Here’s Why People Are Getting Super Emotional Over This Father/Daughter Prom Tweet

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Love him or hate him, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has long called himself the voice of the people – and many Mexicans agree with him. That’s why his latest announcement against social media companies has many so worried.

In the wake of Twitter and Facebook’s (along with many other social media platforms) announcement that they would be restricting or banning Donald Trump from their platforms, the Mexican president expressed his contempt for the decisions. And his intention to create a Mexican social network that won’t be held to the standards from Silicon Valley.

Mexico’s AMLO moves to create a social media network for Mexicans outside of Silicon Valley’s control.

A week after his United States counterpart was kicked off Facebook and Twitter, President López Obrador floated the idea of creating a national social media network to avoid the possibility of Mexicans being censored.

Speaking at his daily news conference, AMLO instructed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt) and other government departments to look at the possibility of creating a state-owned social media site that would guarantee freedom of speech in Mexico.

“We care about freedom a lot, it’s an issue that’s going to be addressed by us,” he told reporters. He also added that Facebook and Twitter have become “global institutions of censorship,” sounding a lot like the alt-right terrorists that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

“To guarantee freedom, for freedom, so there’s no censorship in Mexico. We want a country without censorship. Mexico must be a country of freedom. This is a commitment we have,” he told reporters.

AMLO deeply criticized the moves by Twitter and Facebook to ban Trump from their platforms.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

AMLO – like Trump – is an avid user of social media to connect with his constituents. He’s also been known to spread falsehoods and boast about his achievements on the platforms – sound familiar?

So, it came as little surprise when he tore into social media companies for ‘censoring’ Donald Trump, saying that they have turned into “global institutions of censorship” and are carrying out a “holy inquisition.”

Nobody has the right to silence citizens even if their views are unpopular, López Obrador said. Even if the words used by Trump provoked a violent attack against his own government.

“Since they took these decisions [to suspend Trump], the Statue of Liberty has been turning green with anger because it doesn’t want to become an empty symbol,” he quipped.

So what could a Mexican social media network be called?

The president’s proposal to create a national social media network triggered chatter about what such a site would or should be called. One Twitter user suggested Facemex or Twitmex, apparently taking his inspiration from the state oil company Pemex.

The newspaper Milenio came up with three alternative names and logos for uniquely Mexican sites, suggesting that a Mexican version of Facebook could be called Facebookóatl (inspired by the Aztec feathered-serpent god Quetzalcóatl), Twitter could become Twitterlopochtli (a riff on the name of Aztec war, sun and human deity Huitzilopochtli) and Instagram could become Instagratlán (tlán, which in the Náhuatl language means place near an abundance of something – deer, for example, in the case of Mazatlán – is a common suffix in Mexican place names.)

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Selena Gomez Is Holding Tech And Social Media Accountable After Trump Mob Shuts Down Congress

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Selena Gomez Is Holding Tech And Social Media Accountable After Trump Mob Shuts Down Congress

VALERIE MACON / AFP via Getty Images

A pro-Trump mob stormed Capitol Hill Jan. 6 following months of President Donald Trump and his allies attacking the 2020 elections. Selena Gomez, like most Americans horrified by the attack, spoke out on social media about what happened. She made it clear that part of this falls on tech companies and social media companies.

Selena Gomez called out social media and tech companies for enabling hateful rhetoric.

President Donald Trump and his supporters have used social media to spread misinformation since he was elected in 2016. Americans have watched as President Trump used Twitter to spread falsehoods and conspiracy theories. There have been so many debunked claims that President Trump and his allies have spread with no consequence.

Recently, Twitter started to flag some of President Trump’s tweets as disputed or misleading. It was the first time a social media platform did something that checked President Trump and his rhetoric.

People quickly came to Gomez’s side to uplift her statement.

President Trump has a long history of hateful and dangerous rhetoric on social media. He has misled her supporters with false statements and has incited violence. The president has defended white supremacists on multiple occasions and even retweeted a video of a man shouting white power.

Social media platforms are finally muzzling President Trump with bans and suspensions.

Twitter has put the president on a temporary suspension after he incited the crowd that breached Capitol Hill. Meanwhile, Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg enhanced the original 24-hour ban to a indefinite ban that will last at least until President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. However, people think it is a little too late for these actions.

“Disinformation and extremism researchers have for years pointed to broader network-based exploitation of these platforms,” Sen. Mark R. Warner, D-Va., said in a statement. “As I have continually said, these platforms have served as core organizing infrastructure for violent, far right groups and militia movements for several years now – helping them to recruit, organize, coordinate and in many cases (particularly with respect to YouTube) generate profits from their violent, extremist content.”

What happened Jan. 6 at the nation’s Capitol was avoidable, but it’s clear who incited this violence.

Congress has officially certified President-elect Biden’s win. What should have been a quick process to certify an election turned into a horrifying scene. It is a day that will always define President Trump’s legacy.

READ: Far-Right Trump Supporters Violently Storm The US Capitol Forcing Lockdown

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