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This Latina Was Accepted To 11 Medical Schools And It Was Not Because Of Affirmative Action

Chelsea Batista is blazing a path she never really expected when she was younger. The Dominican woman, who lives in Brooklyn, has recently been accepted to not one but 11 medical schools. Of course, a person of color excelling and making history doesn’t come without some affirmative action claims because we just can’t succeed without help, right? WRONG. Don’t worry though. She is silencing those haters be revealing just how she got accepted to some amazing medical schools: hard work.

Chelsea Batista has made history at her school, Brooklyn College, after being accepted by 11 medical schools.

Chelsea Batista / Facebook

Batista is a senior in the Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College and has been slaying the game since she started. As the daughter of Dominican immigrants, Batista had high educational standards set for her by her parents.

Even though she is totally medical school-bound right now, she wasn’t always sure that she would be able to achieve that dream.


According to her interview with PIX11, Batista was inspired to follow her medical dreams after attending the Gateway to Medicine Program at Brooklyn Technical High School.

“I get into this program and I see kids just like me,” Batista told PIX11. “Kids from neighborhoods like me, backgrounds like me. That’s when I knew that it wasn’t just something that I could say that I wanted to do but something that I could actually do.”

Batista admits that she was happy when she got the first letter because that meant that she would definitely be able to achieve her goal of attending medical school.


Batista applied to a total of 18 medical schools because she was determined to follow her dream and after interviewing at 16 of them, she has a choice.

“When the first acceptance came in from SUNY Downstate, I thought, ‘Thank goodness, at least now I know I’m going to medical school, no matter what,’” Batista told CUNY Newswire. “But then a few weeks later, more started coming in and I didn’t expect it to be so many. With all that hard work I put in, studying all night—it was all worth it.”

And with great success, unfortunately comes great envy. But Batista is setting the record straight to those who are saying she got there through affirmative action.


“Several naysayers have attributed my successes to affirmative action, as opposed to discipline and hard work,” Batista told The Huffington Post. “At some points, I had to remind myself that I earned these accomplishments. That I worked just as hard as those around me and that I had to break through a prominent glass ceiling to get here. I had to remind myself that I was not chosen because I am a Hispanic woman who fulfills the requirements. I was chosen because as a Hispanic woman, I had to struggle through more obstacles and resistance than the typical medical school applicant and I still managed to excel.”

How did she do it? Good, old fashion hard work.

pix11.com

And it was that hard work that got her acceptance to Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Weill Cornell Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York University, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine, and Tufts University School of Medicine. Two of the medical schools, she isn’t allowed to say which, are offering her full scholarships.

She even shared her own study tips with PIX11 so others can follow their dreams.

pix11.com

According to PIX11, here is one of her study tips: asking questions.

“I am never afraid to ask questions. I am that girl that asks a million questions in a lecture. I don’t mind sounding dumb for asking because in those 10 seconds I may seem dumb for knowing nothing, but after asking, I will know it. Compared to not asking and actually not knowing the answer later when it matters.”


READ: She Started Her Own Mexican-Inspired Makeup Line But Regrets She Didn’t Quit Her Day Job Sooner

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

In just a few months, college freshmen will be descending on their campuses across the country. One of these students is Elizabeth Esteban who is the first person from her indigenous tribe in Mexico to be accepted to an Ivy League school.

Elizabeth Esteban is going to Harvard and it is a major deal.

Esteban is a member of the Purépecha tribe, an indigenous community from Michoacán, Mexico. Esteban is the first member of her tribe to be accepted into an Ivy League university, where indigenous representation remains small. Esteban’s parents work as farm laborers in the eastern Coachella Valley in California.

“Well I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News.

Not only was Esteban accepted into Harvard, a prestigious university, she also received a full-ride scholarship. Esteban’s family is part of a community of hundreds of Purépecha people who relocated to the easter Coachella Valley in search of work and a better life.

Esteban plans to study political science.

Dr. Ruiz Speaks with State of the Union Guest, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School.

Join me for a live conversation with my guest for tonight's State of the Union, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School!

Posted by Congressman Raul Ruiz, MD on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Esteban wants to make a difference in her community. As an indigenous woman, Esteban wants to break barriers that are set on women in her community. She told NBC News that her community expects for women to stay home and be stay-at-home mothers.

The incoming Harvard freshmen was discouraged from applying to Harvard at one point because of her community’s unreliable internet connection. Esteban lives in a mobile home with her family in Mecca and struggled to complete course work. The internet went down in the middle of her Harvard interview and it almost prevented her from applying to the university.

“Well, I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News about being accepted to Harvard on a full scholarship.

READ: California, Harvard, MIT File Lawsuits To Challenge Government’s International Student Visa Announcement

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A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Handcuffed And Pepper-Sprayed By New York Police Officers

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A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Handcuffed And Pepper-Sprayed By New York Police Officers

Updated March 10, 2021.

Police brutality is a civil rights violation that has long affected the Black community as well as other minority groups. While the issue has been highlighted extensively by these communities it seems that it’s only been very recently that the general public has developed concern over the issue. This is despite the fact that in so many ways police brutality has not only deeply harmed communities but also sparked major political and social movements such as the civil rights movement of the 1960s and anti-war demonstrations. So much so in fact, the United States has developed an ill-famed reputation for cases of police brutality. Particularly when it comes to the police’s mistreatments and murders of minors like Nolan Davis, Cameron Tillman, and Aiyana Stanley-Jones.

Over the weekend, an incident in Rochester, New York brought attention to the issue once again after body camera showed officers handcuffing and pepper-spraying a 9-year-old girl.

The incident which took place last Friday showed officers brutally restraining a little girl after responding to a call for “family trouble.”

The Rochester Police Department in New York released body camera footage Sunday showing officers handcuffing and pepper-spraying a 9-year-old girl while responding to a call for “family trouble.”

In two disturbing videos, the little girl can be screaming for her father as officers attempt to restrain her. “You’re acting like a child,” a male officer yells at her in the video. “I am a child,” she screams in reply.

“I’m gonna pepper-spray you, and I don’t want to,” a woman officer warns the girl while attempting to put her feet inside of the police car.

“This is your last chance. Otherwise pepper spray is going in your eyeballs,” the officer adds.

The girl begged the officers not to spray her before they did.

Once pepper-sprayed, she cried, “It went in my eyes, it went in my eyes.” The child and her family, nor any of the officers involved in the incident have yet to be identified.

“I’m not going to stand here and tell you that for a 9-year-old to have to be pepper-sprayed is OK,” Police Chief Cynthia Herriott-Sullivan of Rochester said at a press conference Sunday. “It’s not. I don’t see that is who we are as a department.”

This incident isn’t the first for the Rochester Police.

The police department’s top officials resigned last September after protests broke out over the death of Daniel Prude, a Black man who died of asphyxiation after Rochester officers put a hood over his head. Prude’s face had been pinned to the ground by police.

Speaking about the incident Rochester’s Mayor Lovely Warren said that the pepper spray incident was “not something any of us should want to justify.”

Warren said watching the video of the young girl reminded her of her own daughter. “I have a 10-year-old daughter. So she’s a child. She’s a baby,” Warren explained. “And I can tell you that this video, as a mother, is not anything that you want to see. I saw my baby’s face in her face.”

According to Warren, she has asked for the police chief to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation in relation to the incident. She also noted that she welcomed a review from the police accountability board.

The incident reportedly occurred after officers responding to a report of “family trouble” around 3:21 p.m last Friday. Police reported to the area and were alerted that the 9-year-old girl was “upset” and “suicidal” and had indicated that she “wanted to kill herself and that she wanted to kill her mom.”

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. You can also text TALK to 741741 for free, anonymous 24/7 crisis support in the US from the Crisis Text Line.

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