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This Latina Was Accepted To 11 Medical Schools And It Was Not Because Of Affirmative Action

PIX11

Chelsea Batista is blazing a path she never really expected when she was younger. The Dominican woman, who lives in Brooklyn, has recently been accepted to not one but 11 medical schools. Of course, a person of color excelling and making history doesn’t come without some affirmative action claims because we just can’t succeed without help, right? WRONG. Don’t worry though. She is silencing those haters be revealing just how she got accepted to some amazing medical schools: hard work.

Chelsea Batista has made history at her school, Brooklyn College, after being accepted by 11 medical schools.

Chelsea Batista / Facebook
CREDIT: Chelsea Batista / Facebook

Batista is a senior in the Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College and has been slaying the game since she started. As the daughter of Dominican immigrants, Batista had high educational standards set for her by her parents.

Even though she is totally medical school-bound right now, she wasn’t always sure that she would be able to achieve that dream.


According to her interview with PIX11, Batista was inspired to follow her medical dreams after attending the Gateway to Medicine Program at Brooklyn Technical High School.

“I get into this program and I see kids just like me,” Batista told PIX11. “Kids from neighborhoods like me, backgrounds like me. That’s when I knew that it wasn’t just something that I could say that I wanted to do but something that I could actually do.”

Batista admits that she was happy when she got the first letter because that meant that she would definitely be able to achieve her goal of attending medical school.


Batista applied to a total of 18 medical schools because she was determined to follow her dream and after interviewing at 16 of them, she has a choice.

“When the first acceptance came in from SUNY Downstate, I thought, ‘Thank goodness, at least now I know I’m going to medical school, no matter what,’” Batista told CUNY Newswire. “But then a few weeks later, more started coming in and I didn’t expect it to be so many. With all that hard work I put in, studying all night—it was all worth it.”

And with great success, unfortunately comes great envy. But Batista is setting the record straight to those who are saying she got there through affirmative action.


“Several naysayers have attributed my successes to affirmative action, as opposed to discipline and hard work,” Batista told The Huffington Post. “At some points, I had to remind myself that I earned these accomplishments. That I worked just as hard as those around me and that I had to break through a prominent glass ceiling to get here. I had to remind myself that I was not chosen because I am a Hispanic woman who fulfills the requirements. I was chosen because as a Hispanic woman, I had to struggle through more obstacles and resistance than the typical medical school applicant and I still managed to excel.”

How did she do it? Good, old fashion hard work.

pix11.com
CREDIT: pix11.com

And it was that hard work that got her acceptance to Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Weill Cornell Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York University, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine, and Tufts University School of Medicine. Two of the medical schools, she isn’t allowed to say which, are offering her full scholarships.

She even shared her own study tips with PIX11 so others can follow their dreams.

pix11.com
CREDIT: pix11.com

According to PIX11, here is one of her study tips: asking questions.

“I am never afraid to ask questions. I am that girl that asks a million questions in a lecture. I don’t mind sounding dumb for asking because in those 10 seconds I may seem dumb for knowing nothing, but after asking, I will know it. Compared to not asking and actually not knowing the answer later when it matters.”


READ: She Started Her Own Mexican-Inspired Makeup Line But Regrets She Didn’t Quit Her Day Job Sooner

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Afraid Of Being Trolled, She Hadn't Posted A Full-Body Picture Until College And Now She's A Fashion Blogger

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Afraid Of Being Trolled, She Hadn’t Posted A Full-Body Picture Until College And Now She’s A Fashion Blogger

Instagram/@thisisjessicatorres

The fashion world is finally starting to realize real women aren’t just skinny models.

Thanks to plus-size models such as Denise Bidot, Ashley Graham and Alessandra Garcia, the fashion industry is refreshingly featuring more women of color with various body types.

Instagram/@denisebidot @theashleygraham @alessandragl
CREDIT: Instagram/@denisebidot @theashleygraham @alessandragl

These women exude confidence and are proud to show off their body despite their size — which is why the term “body positive” has exploded.

One of the most down-to-earth style bloggers that is revolutionizing the way we see fashion and body positivity is Jessica Torres.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPI_3k6A0Pc/?taken-by=thisisjessicatorres

This 26-year-old Ecuadorian from the Bronx is upping the style game in an incredible way on Instagram and YouTube. In five short years, she’s gone from former retail clerk to style blogger, body positive and fashion reporter at Revelist.

But let’s back track a little. If you’re unfamiliar with the term body positive, here’s roughly what it means:

View this post on Instagram

That time I wore my pjs out and about 😛

A post shared by Jessica Torres (@thisisjessicatorres) on

Mallorie Dunn, founder of the body positive fashion line SmartGlamour, told Psychology Today that this relatively new term means “accepting the body you have as well as the changes in shape, size, and ability it may undergo due to nature, age, or your own personal choices throughout your lifetime.” In other words, being body positive is “understanding that your worth and what’s going on with you physically are two separate entities.”

For Torres, being body positive was a way to cope with her own insecurities.

“I can’t remember when I realized that bo-po had become a cultural phenomenon because it was who I was, or at least who I had become, “Torres tells mitú. “Before body positivity was the cool thing, it was the way I was surviving in this world. It made me realize that you are worth more than your body and that size of your jeans does not determine your worth.”

Torres tells mitú that growing up, she always felt embarrassed about her body.

“People would always compare me to my sisters and friends,” Torres says. “I was taught at a really young age that to be beautiful and successful I had to be thin. That really halted a lot in my life. I always thought that the day I lost weight and became thin I would be happy and successful. I would wear big baggy t-shirts and jeans that were two sizes too big to make sure I hid my body.”

Torres says that it wasn’t until she got to college that she had an awakening of confidence thanks to people she met there.

“When I got to college I met friends who were unapologetically themselves and made me realize that I could start living my best life now, not 10 or 50 pounds later,” Torres tells mitú. “I also discovered fashion blogs at that time and I became obsessed. I would go onto these blogs and save the pictures hoping they would encourage me to be brave enough to wear something bold and not be embarrassed about my body.”

Two years into college, Torres decided she was ready and confident enough to take the brave step and take a full body picture and post it online.

View this post on Instagram

#tbt missing the summer

A post shared by Jessica Torres (@thisisjessicatorres) on

Torres credits her mom and sisters for continuing to support and motivate the work she does today. But also, Torres says, she wants to inspire little girls that need someone to look up to, just as she needed while growing up.

“I realized that I needed to be the role model that I needed when I was younger…”

Torres tells mitú that she wanted to be someone who could’ve told her that she could be “fat and fashionable, happy and successful” and that’s why she started blogging.

That determination has taken her to great heights including speaking at SXSW this year on a panel titled “Rise of the ‘Real Girl,’” and this is clearly just the beginning for her.

In the past couple of years, she’s gotten lots of attention from various fashion magazine and blogs.

Part of being an online personality means Torres is gaining new friends and fans.

She killed the look, just like Torres, don’t you think?

She’s even famous in Puerto Rico!

Facebook/Darlene Lebron
CREDIT: Facebook/Darlene Lebron

On a recent trip to Puerto Rico for an event, Torres was humbled by all the women that approached her with gratitude.

“I was so shocked to have so many people there waiting to see me and talk to me,” Torres said. “They mentioned the videos and stories I’ve written. I couldn’t believe it. The best part was to hear their stories of how because of my videos they decided to start their journey of self-love. One of them had even worn a two-piece swimsuit for the first time and showed me pictures.”

But of course, along with fans, will come the haters.

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Still not over this look. #anythingforselenas

A post shared by Jessica Torres (@thisisjessicatorres) on

“The hardest thing about being online is the negativity I get,” Torres says. “A lot of the things I do is to set an example for other men and women who are afraid to do things like wearing a swimsuit, crop top, form-fitting dress or even a sleeveless shirt. So I constantly put pictures of my body online and all of a sudden my body becomes the subject of discussion for many. People forget that the people online have feelings and emotions. I don’t personally get bothered by what they say but when my siblings or family see it and get offended that’s when it bothers me.”

Seeing the good and bad that comes with being a body positive style blogger, what does Torres tell aspiring people who want to do the same thing that she does?

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Wearing this cute outfit via @gwynniebee. Tap for details.

A post shared by Jessica Torres (@thisisjessicatorres) on

“If you are interested in becoming a style blogger you should know that this is harder than it looks,” Torres says. “Find the reason why you want to do this, find your message and stick to it. Work hard and make a lot of connections with as many people as you can.”


READ: This Latina Model Has A Growing Clothing Line For ALL Women

What do you think about body positivity? Share this story and comment in the section below! 

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