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This Latina Was Accepted To 11 Medical Schools And It Was Not Because Of Affirmative Action

Chelsea Batista is blazing a path she never really expected when she was younger. The Dominican woman, who lives in Brooklyn, has recently been accepted to not one but 11 medical schools. Of course, a person of color excelling and making history doesn’t come without some affirmative action claims because we just can’t succeed without help, right? WRONG. Don’t worry though. She is silencing those haters be revealing just how she got accepted to some amazing medical schools: hard work.

Chelsea Batista has made history at her school, Brooklyn College, after being accepted by 11 medical schools.

Chelsea Batista / Facebook
CREDIT: Chelsea Batista / Facebook

Batista is a senior in the Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College and has been slaying the game since she started. As the daughter of Dominican immigrants, Batista had high educational standards set for her by her parents.

Even though she is totally medical school-bound right now, she wasn’t always sure that she would be able to achieve that dream.


According to her interview with PIX11, Batista was inspired to follow her medical dreams after attending the Gateway to Medicine Program at Brooklyn Technical High School.

“I get into this program and I see kids just like me,” Batista told PIX11. “Kids from neighborhoods like me, backgrounds like me. That’s when I knew that it wasn’t just something that I could say that I wanted to do but something that I could actually do.”

Batista admits that she was happy when she got the first letter because that meant that she would definitely be able to achieve her goal of attending medical school.


Batista applied to a total of 18 medical schools because she was determined to follow her dream and after interviewing at 16 of them, she has a choice.

“When the first acceptance came in from SUNY Downstate, I thought, ‘Thank goodness, at least now I know I’m going to medical school, no matter what,’” Batista told CUNY Newswire. “But then a few weeks later, more started coming in and I didn’t expect it to be so many. With all that hard work I put in, studying all night—it was all worth it.”

And with great success, unfortunately comes great envy. But Batista is setting the record straight to those who are saying she got there through affirmative action.


“Several naysayers have attributed my successes to affirmative action, as opposed to discipline and hard work,” Batista told The Huffington Post. “At some points, I had to remind myself that I earned these accomplishments. That I worked just as hard as those around me and that I had to break through a prominent glass ceiling to get here. I had to remind myself that I was not chosen because I am a Hispanic woman who fulfills the requirements. I was chosen because as a Hispanic woman, I had to struggle through more obstacles and resistance than the typical medical school applicant and I still managed to excel.”

How did she do it? Good, old fashion hard work.

pix11.com
CREDIT: pix11.com

And it was that hard work that got her acceptance to Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Weill Cornell Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York University, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine, and Tufts University School of Medicine. Two of the medical schools, she isn’t allowed to say which, are offering her full scholarships.

She even shared her own study tips with PIX11 so others can follow their dreams.

pix11.com
CREDIT: pix11.com

According to PIX11, here is one of her study tips: asking questions.

“I am never afraid to ask questions. I am that girl that asks a million questions in a lecture. I don’t mind sounding dumb for asking because in those 10 seconds I may seem dumb for knowing nothing, but after asking, I will know it. Compared to not asking and actually not knowing the answer later when it matters.”


READ: She Started Her Own Mexican-Inspired Makeup Line But Regrets She Didn’t Quit Her Day Job Sooner

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Instagram’s Beloved Summer Read Mexican Gothic To Become Limited Hulu Series Produced By Kelly Ripa

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Instagram’s Beloved Summer Read Mexican Gothic To Become Limited Hulu Series Produced By Kelly Ripa

Penguin Random House

During these times, Noemí Taboada is more than just the heroine of the novel Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. She’s also become the hero come to rescue us from our pandemic boredom. The story of the 1950s Mexican socialite summoned to save her vulnerable cousin has entranced summer readers stuck at home during the pandemic and without much new material to thrive on. Sales for the horror novel soared just as soon as the book hit shelves this past June and now fortunately for fans, news about the novel gets better.

Hulu has picked up Mexican Gothic and given it the greenlight a drama series!

The series comes from Kelly Ripa and Mark Consuelos’ Milojo Productions and ABC Signature.

According to Deadline, Moreno-Garcia is set executive produce the series alongside Milojo’s Ripa, Consuelos, and Albert Bianchini.

Moreno-Garcia is a Mexican-born author currently living in Vancouver, British Columbia. She is the best-selling author of Gods of Jade and Shadow, Certain Dark Things and Untamed Shore. Speaking to Deadline, the author explained that she is “excited to see the novel come to life and to meet the talented, diverse crew and cast members that will take us on this journey.”

“We feel like we hit the literary jackpot, and cannot wait to bring Silvia’s gorgeous writing to life, together with Hulu,” Ripa also commented in a statement.

Mexican Gothic was published this past June and welcomed with critical acclaim.

The book follows Noemí Taboada, a young socialite living in 1950s Mexico City who takes to the Mexican countryside and the mountains of Hidalgo after being summoned by her cousin who is worried that her new husband, a rich and enigmatic Englishman, might be attempting to kill her.

But it’s not just the mystery and intrigue of the story that will captivate readers. For those interested in rich histories and exploring their own roots, this book will bring so much intrigue if you haven’t already read it.

At the heart of Moreno-Garcia’s story is an examination of the effects of eugenicism and colonization in Mexico. 

Speaking to NPR about her novel, Moreno-Garcia explained that the inspiration for it came from a real town in Mexico that had been mined by the Spanish and overtaken in the 1800s by British forces.

“It has an English cemetery, just like in my book. And that is what inspired the novel. I went there one time and I was walking around the cemetery and it was misty. And it’s kind of chilly and rainy there, especially certain times of the year. And I looked around and I thought, this is something out of a Hammer film. So it never really quite left me,” she revealed. “But the other reason to set it there is because, I think when people think about Mexico, sometimes they do know that it was conquered by the Spanish. And they think the Spanish left and that was it. That was the only case of colonialism that existed. But obviously, many other forces came into Mexico throughout the years and engaged in explicit warfare or more subtle types of control… Americans came and all sorts of foreign interventions have taken place throughout the history of Mexico. And I just thought it was an interesting bit of the colonial legacy, to look at the British legacy, and to set it in Mexico to examine some of those forces colliding.”

Readers of the hit book have been quick to comment on its new status as an upcoming television series. “I will say my favorite was the atmosphere and gothic suspense. I enjoy horror, but I’m quite picky with my horror and that aspect of this book was the least appealing part to me. It was tame for most of the book, but there are some really twisted scenarios towards the end that were really unsettling… and not in the spine-tingling way I generally enjoy. Prepare to be disturbed.⁣ And maybe even a little grossed out.,” one user wrote about the book in a post to Instagram.

“I love how the writer uses most of the key elements of the gothic genre, but at the same time subverts it in order to discuss racism, feminism, and colonialism,” another commented.

Fans who loved the characters and plot of Mexican Gothic will likely fall in love with Hulu’s new take and we, for one, can’t wait!

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AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

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AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

Brittany Greeson / Getty

As young Latinos, there’s no denying the fact that learning to fold our family culture into the customs we acquire as Americans can shape our abilities to handle pressure. In the process of assimilation, we learn how to meet the demands of our parents and our peers all the while juggling the everyday expectations we shoulder while in school.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez knows all about managing these expectations. Last year, while addressing the media’s desire to see her pursue her career and fulfill societal expectations of her personal life (AKA get married) the politician reminded her followers that she can handle pressure because she grew up in a Latino household.

To boot, she was the only daughter in her home.

But what about the rest of us?

Those of us who maybe aren’t quite yet thriving politicians but manage to succeed in our everyday lives and do it all? We asked Latinas on FIERCE about how they’re able to relate to AOC’s comments and the responses were not only enlightening but a good reminder of Latina strength.

“And the oldest for that matter!! You not only learn to be tough, but also to be resourceful and amazingly great at delegating.” – emramirez1

“So true ughh the oldest child the only female and the first American born and the first to go to college oyeeeee the PRESSURE #mujerfuerte AINT NO ONE CAN TAKE ME DOWN lol por que our familia made us strong!” –paulinacastrellon

“Or the OLDEST daughter.” –m0zz_

“And be a food server for many years…” –kimoti_87

“Only daughter and only child! Thats some other level of #latinohousehold.” –wellnessparalamama

“Or a daughter in a Latino household with a strict father period!” –elliev03

“Look i went through allot and none of it made me stronger im a very shaky person theres a difference between trauma and tough love , i think she had tough love trauama fucks u up.” –__head___in___the____clouds__

“Oldest daughter, of 3 girls! You are the example!” – _cynnrenee

“I only wish the means to becoming tough and handle pressure for a Latina daughter didn’t root in traumatic machismo (male chauvinism) and systematic inequalities experiences. Surely there are ways to learn to have an affirmative tone and handle pressure without the trauma.” – marimukkii

“Or just being in a Latina household, period.” –mar_knut

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