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This Is Why You Saw Yalitza Aparicio’s Face All Over Coachella

Latinx and Latin American artists made history at this year’s Coachella. At the massive music festival in Indio, Calif., heavy-hitters like Cardi B, Selena Gomez, J Balvin, Bad Bunny and Ozuna lit up stages with their Spanish-language bangers. But our musicians weren’t the only ones attracting audiences. Yalitza Aparicio — or rather a cutout of the actress’s face — also gained attention.

According to Remezcla, Jesus Nuñez, a fan of the “Roma star,” brought a giant cardboard cutout of Aparicio’s look from the Oscars to the event. Nuñez, who is the son of Mexican immigrants and was raised in Baja California, was inspired by the indigenous actress’s story of survival and wanted to highlight her in a crowd of tens of thousands.

“The reason why I was inspired to make the sign with the image of Yalitza was because of her story. It doesn’t matter where you’re from or what your culture is, you can achieve a lot of things as long as you propose to do it. Despite all her success, she’s still down to earth,” he told the news site through email.

Aparicio’s presence at Coachella is significant for another reason: real indigenous representation. Attendees of Coachella, and festivals like it, have long been criticized for wearing native headdresses. You know the photos: The almost-always white girl sporting a feathered ornamental covering on her head and getting called out via social media. This time, there was an actual indigenous woman in the crowd, and she was donning a smile and a graceful hand wave.

The cardboard version of the actress was a big hit at the festival, with fans asking to take photos with her. Aparicio’s welcoming grin could be found participating in the La Chona Challenge at Los Tucanes de Tijuana’s performance, taking photos with fans during Mon Laferte’s set and enjoying Bad Bunny’s show.

Stars, they really are just like us.

Read: Latinos Showed Their Power On The Stages Of Coachella 2019

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The Latin Grammys Just Announced A New Host That Has Fans Excited For This Year’s Awards

Entertainment

The Latin Grammys Just Announced A New Host That Has Fans Excited For This Year’s Awards

Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

It’s official: award season is among us. We just celebrated the Billboard Music Awards and Latin Music Week and now we’re on to the 21st Latin Grammys.

Despite the insane year we’ve all experienced, it’s safe to say that one highlight of the year has been the music. From Bad Bunny and Cardi B to J Balvin, Maluma, and Karol G, we’ve been blessed with some serious bops this year.

To help us recognize all the incredible talent from our community, the academy has announced they’ve tapped Oscar-nominated actress Yalitza Aparicio to co-host this year’s show. The Indigenous-Mexican’s star continues to shine bright ever since her debut in the 2018 film Roma and we can’t wait to see her taking on this exciting new role.

The Latin Grammys have tapped Yalitza Aparicio to co-host the upcoming award ceremony.

It’s been a year since her historic Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her debut performance in Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma, and she’s been busy ever since. Now, we’ll get to see her take on another major awards show: The 21st Latin Grammys.

The Indigenous Mexican actress will co-host Latin music’s biggest night after original co-host Roselyn Sánchez dropped out due to an injury. The Latin Recording Academy announced Wednesday that Aparicio would take over hosting duties alongside actress Ana Brenda Contreras and singer Carlos Rivera.

“We had been in discussions for some time about having me host, but it was the theme of the night that really caught my attention,” Aparicio told EW of her new gig. “I really believe in that message, especially now as we find ourselves in such critical times where so many people are feeling isolated. 

“Music has the power to motivate and to lift our spirits. I select what I’ll listen to based on what my needs are at the time. If I need some energy, I crank up the Reggaeton. I’m the type of person that needs music in order to get my day going. If I don’t play Reggaeton in the morning, I’ll go back to sleep.”

The announcement comes shortly after the original host – Roselyn Sánchez – was forced to drop out due to injury.

Of course, we’re excited to see Aparicio taking the stage to co-host this year’s award ceremony. However, before she was announced as a co-host, Puerto Rican actress Roselyn Sánchez was set to host.

“Friends, with a heavy heart, I must inform you that I will no longer be participating in the Latin Grammys ceremony this year,” Sánchez wrote on Instagram last week in Spanish. “I suffered a fall, and my doctor put a boot on me. The doctor’s recommendation was to avoid standing for long periods of time or wearing heels. I’m going to miss you.”

Aparicio has been proud to represent her community on the big screen and at events and ceremonies around the world.

Ever since her debut role in Roma, Aparicio has been no stranger to award season. She made history last year as the first Indigenous Mexican performer to be nominated for lead actress after winning hearts as Cleo, a resilient housekeeper caring for a middle-class family in 1970s Mexico City while enduring great personal loss.

Aparicio – a former schoolteacher-turned-actress – has proudly been using her platform to advocate for domestic workers and Indigenous communities after representing them on the big screen in Netflix’s Roma.

“Every step I take, I carry with me a community that doesn’t see themselves reflected in media. I work hard to ensure we are represented the right way,” she told Entertainment Weekly upon Wednesday’s Latin Grammys announcement. 

“I am conscious of the fact that I am not alone in this world. We are an important part of society, and I carry every voice out there that feels silenced due to lack of representation in Hollywood. I know who I am, and nothing will deter me from lifting up others.”

Although they’ll be very different from year’s past, the upcoming ceremony looks like it’ll be a must watch.

Credit: Mindy Small/FilmMagic

Thanks to the pandemic, this year’s awards ceremony will obviously be quite different from years past – but they still sound like it will definitely be worth tuning into.

Although there won’t be a live audience nor a red carpet, the 21st Latin Grammy Awards will feature a heavy lineup of some of the year’s top artists, including performances by Anitta, J Balvin, Camilo, Lupita Infante, Juanes, Mariachi Sol de México de José Hernández, Ricky Martin, Carla Morrison, José Luis Perales and Prince Royce.

Other previously announced performers include Anuel AA, Marc Anthony, Bad Bunny, Calibre 50, Pedro Capó, Julio Reyes Copello, Alex Cuba, Alejandro Fernández, Karol G, Kany García, Guaynaa, Los Tigres del Norte, Víctor Manuelle, Ricardo Montaner, Christian Nodal, Debi Nova, Fito Páez, Nathy Peluso, Raquel Sofía and Sebastián Yatra.

Also exciting is that this year, the academy introduced three new categories: Best Pop/Rock Song, Best Reggaeton Performance, and Best Rap/Hip-Hop Song. Leading this year’s nominations are Balvin, Bad Bunny and Ozuna, all of whom received nods for the coveted record of the year trophy.

The ceremony is set to air on November 19 on Univision via live broadcast from Miami, while concerts will be taking place at various places around the world. Will you be tuning in?

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Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty

Since the start of her acting career, Oaxacan actress Yalitza Aparicio has been sure to see that her work helps uphold her community. While many actors on the rise tend to focus on racking up more acting roles and fame, Aparicio has been much more vocal about her desire to focus on her advocacy and work for organizations like Cine Too. What’s more, ensuring that she secures proper representation for Indigenous people like herself.

While Aparicio first made headlines and won our hearts with her performance in the 2018 film Roma the Indigenous actress has yet to appear in another role on screen.

It turns out, it isn’t for a lack of offers.

Speaking with Indie Wire about her career, Aparicio has said that she is taking her time to find a role that properly represents her and her community.

“My objective in my career is to give visibility to all of us who have been kept in the dark for so long,” Aparicio claimed in a recent interview with IndieWire. “The acting projects I’m working on are moving slowly because I’m putting all my efforts in not being pigeonholed because of my appearance.”

Aparicio, who is 26-years-old, was born in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, rocketed to fame when she took on the role of Cleo in Alfonso Cuarón’s 2018 movie Roma. The film, which was nominated for various Academy Awards followed Aparicio as Cleo a housekeeper who works in a wealthy household in Mexico City’s Colonia Roma. Aparicio’s role brought her praise not just for her skills but for her role in solidifying a much-needed portrayal of Mexico’s Indigenous community.

Still, despite the praise and fame, the role brought her, Aparicio is adamant that her next role will be something greater.

“I come from a community where there’s no movie theater, and as a consequence, the population — especially the children that grow up in those communities — has less of an interest in the cinematic arts. [Cine Too] has the possibility to reach these children and provide an opportunity to instill in them the passion for cinema and teach them about this art form,” she explained in her interview. “I’m conscious that every step I take may open doors for someone else and at the same time it’s an opportunity for society to realize we are part of it and that we are here,”

In her interview, Aparicio points out that while she is very aware that Indigenous filmmakers and allies “have a complicated job because these things can’t be changed overnight,” she is still pushing for real change.

“Wherever I go, I’ll always be proudly representing our Indigenous communities,” she asserted. “We can show people that the only limits are within us.”

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