Fierce

From Being Cooks To Being Mountain Climbers, These Bolivian Mujeres Are Challenging The Machismo Culture That Exists In Their Country

While living in a machista country, these women are taking a stance and climbing ice cold mountains…in their skirts.

An indigenous group of women in Bolivia, known as “Cholitas,” are mostly recognized for their traditional attire, including round hats, large earrings, and colorful skirts. These women are sticking to their indigenous attire while they battle against gender roles of women in Bolivia.

What started off as a group of women who once worked as cooks in the mountains, then turned into a group of women who had a passion for mountain climbing. Leader of the mountain climbing Cholitas, Jimena Lidia Huayales, points out the criticism they’ve received such as, “How could a woman climb a mountain? That’s wrong!” Although mountain climbing is not under the expected criteria of what it means to be a “proper” Bolivian woman, being on top of a mountain is what makes them feel so free – above the world and above every oppressive inequality.


READ: Listen To The Pep Talk This Latina Told Herself As She Stepped Into Work As The Only Woman Firefighter In Her Team


Aren’t these women incredible? Don’t forget to comment and hit the share button below!

Parents Are Debating Whether Or Not It Is Harmful, Even Perverted, To Call A Baby A ‘Heartbreaker’ Or ‘Ladies Man’

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Parents Are Debating Whether Or Not It Is Harmful, Even Perverted, To Call A Baby A ‘Heartbreaker’ Or ‘Ladies Man’

Visual Ideas/Nora Pelaez

Ever since Michelle Obama pointed out the ways in which parents inflict gender biases on children, we’ve been a lot more conscientious of the ways in which these impacts occur. In particular, we’ve become more concerned with how to teach young boys how to respect women and treat them responsibly. Recently a discussion on the site LipsickAlley about the use of terms like “ladies man” reminded us of another way that our culture and words can hinder these efforts.

LipstickAlley user Curlista93 recently asked users “who refer to their sons as “heartbreakers” and “ladies man” at a very young age” whether or not they thought using such terms were “more likely to encourage or allow fuckboi behavior” when their children get older.

It didn’t take long for women to come forward with all kinds of opinions and for us at FIERCE to nod our heads in approval.

Mostly because, as one user pointed out when terms like these are applied to young boys they often simply imply a “code for he ain’t gon be shit.”

Of course, comments like these are well-meaning. They’re intended really to tell parents that their child is attractive and even sweet maybe. Still, in a lot of ways messages to children, ones that they are “ladies men,” or “heartbreakers” indicate that these are admirable traits to beheld. Moreover, being defined by these characteristics is the goal.

As one user in the thread pointed out, it’s also extremely sexist. “Fathers/Mothers posting pics of their 2-year-old son calling them these names, and they usually never refer to their daughters as heartbreakers. I assume these parents are more likely to groom or allow certain behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood.”

Also, It’s oddly sexual

Some users on the thread strongly disagreed with this sentiment. As one user wrote, “It’s not that serious. It’s just another way to say he’s a handsome young man. Don’t think too hard about it. But there IS something oddly sexualizing about the comments. “I think it’s weird and inappropriate. Sexualizing underaged children, particularly infants and toddlers, reeks of pedophilia/grooming to me,” another user said in response to the question.

It’s a road map for a bad boyfriend.

“Some of y’all don’t understand the power of these messages we give to our children,” another user pointed out. “Telling the boys that they will be heartbreakers and telling the girls they will break a lot of hearts is all putting those thoughts into their minds that that’s what they should do and it’s fine. Just like telling them that they ain’t shit or just like Their sorry ass daddies.”

It sets the bar low.

As one user pointed out “Its code for he ain’t gon be shit.” Why tell boys they’re “heartbreakers” when you could call them “future feminists” and “activists in-the-making”?

It makes for an entitled man in the future.

“I think it sets up destructive and entitled mindsets and behaviors surrounding social and dating dynamics. I loathe anything and everything that sexualizes or fetishizes kids and promotes highly questionable and problematic behaviors, attitudes, and complexes.”

Sure, as some users pointed out, in the end, comments like these might not aim to be so serious.

Often times, admirers of your children might just be trying to implement a compliment. But words have power (have the last 4 years not taught any of us this??). No doubt, comments like these might be coming from well-meaning people but they are comments that stem from some pretty problematic cultural norms about male behavior.

Identifying whether or not we’re dating a man or a little boy can be hard enough as it is. Let’s avoid making it worse.

Recent Report Puts a Price Tag on How Much Outdated Standards of Machismo are Losing Everyone Money

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Recent Report Puts a Price Tag on How Much Outdated Standards of Machismo are Losing Everyone Money

Matteo Colombo | Getty Images

A recent study conducted by Brazilian-based gender equality organization Promundo and Unilever-owned cologne brand AXE concluded that toxic masculinity costs the US economy at least $15.7 billion annually.

The study, entitled “The Cost of the Man Box” comes after Promundo and AXE’s 2017 report, “The Man Box”

And Promundo knows what they’re talking about–a Brazilian-based organization, this company aims to “prevent violence by engaging men and boys in partnership with women and girls”.

The original 2017 report investigated how harmful toxic masculine ideals are for young men. In the study, “The Man Box” was defined as a “rigid construct of cultural ideas about male identity”. According to the report, this construct included “acting tough, looking physically attractive, sticking to rigid gender roles, being heterosexual, having sexual prowess, and using aggression to resolve conflicts”. AKA: classic expressions of machismo.

In the 2019 report, “The Cost of the Man Box”, Promundo and AXE measured the economic cost of toxic masculinity by drawing from available public health data about negative incidents they believe are directly caused by warped ideas of what it means to be a man.

The incidents they believe are influenced by toxic masculinity are “traffic accidents, suicide, depression, sexual violence, bullying and violence, and binge drinking”.

“We already know that when guys have stereotypical ideas about manhood — like they need to be tough, not ask for help, and seem cool at all costs — they might be closed off, rude, or tell a sexist joke,” said CEO of Promundo, Gary Barker, in an interview with Teen Vogue. “What our study confirms is that the impact of these ideas go even further, and that they have real, economic costs.”

Barker also stated that he hoped the report will serve as a “wake-up call” to a society that values cold hard cash over less quantifiable factors like the negative social and emotional impact of toxic machismo.

As we know, Latina Twitter has a thing or two to say about machismo…

While many men think that acting tough and aggressive is a way to protect themselves, it’s actually costing them lucrative jobs and healthy relationships.

This Latina minced no words expressing what she thinks about machismo culture:

Sometimes, it’s hard to even tell what machismo culture is because it’s so deeply ingrained in our society.

This Latino recognizes that there’s a way to respect your culture while looking for ways for it to improve:

We’re making progress, but we still have a lot of work to do. Hopefully, reports like this one will keep pushing the dial forward.

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