Fierce

Some People Are Calling Out Makeup Companies For Crossing The Line Of Cheeky Names To Racial Tropes

We’ve never worked in the cosmetic industry, so we can only assume that finding the perfect name for a product can be tricky to say the least. There are products with hilarious, and even NSFW names —NARS we’re talking to you. Apparently, the more scandalous the product is named, the better. Even some of the most trendy cosmetics have cheeky names, so it seems like in the world of beauty, anything goes. From cheeky, to ridiculous to just down-right offensive, here are some names that left us wondering; who approved these?

1. Chantecaille Foundation in the shade; ’Banana’.

www.nordstrom.com

As opposed to the cute names appointed to lighter shades, such as “Aura” and “Vanilla;” the darker shade was named “Banana”. Now, maybe it’s just me, but giving a darker skin tone the name ‘banana’ sounds like a good enough reference to the monkey comparison. Comparing dark-skinned people to monkeys is a racial stance as old as America and we’d love to find out what the Chantecaille team was thinking when they gave that name to a dark skin tone —smdh.

2. Color Pop Cosmetics’ “Yikes” and “Typo” sculpting stix. 

www.colorpop.com

In the same way, as we noted in the previous example, here the lighter skin tones had names like “Castle” and “Dove,” whereas the darker ones were titled “Typo” and “Yikes.” Yikes, is there anything shocking or alarming about a darker skin tone? Nobody’s skin is a typo, Color Pop.

ColourPop issued an apology statement and quickly renamed the deeper shades. The Sculpting Stix as a whole has since been discontinued.

2. MAC Cosmetics’ “Vibe Tribe” Collection.

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I mean… do we have to keep saying this? Indigenous cultures are not fashion —or in this case beauty— trends. This 2016 collection was instantly accused of cultural appropriation and enforcing Native American stereotypes. The packaging of the collection featured ‘tribal’ patterns and the shades had names such as “Arrowhead” and “Call of the Canyon.” What’s worse, the campaign featured models wearing Native American headdresses —which we’ve established time and again, is disrespectful AF.

3. MAC Cosmetics x Rodarte “Juarez” polish.

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Ciudad Juarez is a city known for the phenomenon of female homicides, called feminicidio in Spanish. The city has been—famously, may I add—plagued by the violent deaths of hundreds of women and girls since 1993. MAC and fashion house Rodarte collaborated in a highly anticipated collection inspired by Mexico in 2010. One of the nail polishes in the collection was named ‘Juarez’, which disturbed customers and social media users. 

MAC apologized but kept the product on its shelves —guess they weren’t that sorry. The makeup brand did, however, “give a portion of the proceeds from the MAC Rodarte collection to help those in need in Juarez.”

4. The Balm’s “Meet Matt” eye shadow palette.

www.thebalm.com

Every shade in this eye shadow palette, which is still available under the site’s bestseller section, was named for a different “Matt,” and many found it’s choice of last names questionable. 

The brand paired the last names Lin, Lopez, Kumar, and Ahmed to yellow, brown, brick red, and black shades, which a lot of customers —ourselves included— found racist. 

5. Ben Nye’s Cream Character Base.

Back in 2015, Ben Nye, the special FX and stage makeup brand, sold a deep complexion base cream called “Minstrel Brown”. FYI —and get ready to have your mind blown— Minstrels were theatric shows performed by white actors in blackface during the 19th century. The shows were specifically intended to mock and degrade black people. 

Ben Nye renamed the shade —and every shade in the collection— but the brand never apologized or commented on the incredibly inappropriate name. 

6. “Iris I Was Thinner” OPI nail polish

www.makeupalley.com

Because women need to be reminded of the toxic beauty ideal that we ‘should strive to be thin’. This nail polish is a no from me, dog. 

7. “Miso Happy With This Color” OPI nail polish.

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We’ll admit that some of OPI’s nail polish color names make us giggle. But not when they’re making puns that suggest a stereotype of how Asians speak. According to portrayals in pop culture, an Asian face must mean an Asian accent — and often, the accent is for comedic effect in movies and television shows.

8. Fenty’s “Geisha Chic” highlighter

Instagram @trendmood1

Ok, we love queen RiRi but more often than not, Asian targeted racism gets glossed over and we’re not here for this name. A Geisha or ‘Geiko’ is a Japanese woman who entertains guests through talents such as dance, music, and singing —the tradition can be traced back centuries, and it’s not fair to minimize it. 

Fenty team members personally messaged the people that left comments about the product on Instagram and quickly pulled the highlighter from their online store. “We wanted to personally apologize. Thank you so much for educating us,” read their apology.

9. Wycon’s “Black As A N***a”

www.wyconcosmetics.com

At this point, I feel like brands are using racial insensitivity as a marketing ploy. Because in what world does it seem right to give a product —or anything else for the matter- this name? A quick scroll through the Italian beauty brand will leave you pressed to find any representation of people of color —but of course hip-hop culture is up for grabs when it comes to the naming of product shades for the brand, which also uses names like “Drop it Like It’s Hot” and “Bootylicious.” #cancelled

10. Kat Von D’s “Selektion” lipstick shade

twitter @thekatvond

Kat Von D has been accused of anti-semitism time and again, and I guess we’ll never know if it’s a real claim or if it’s just a product of Twitter users’ machinations. But one thing is true, her eponymous makeup line launched a lipstick shade with the name “Selektion,” which in German simply means “screening,” or “picking.” However, the use of the German word in English speek has become taboo due to the use it had by Nazis in the selection of prisoners for death in concentration camps. 

Whether the name was a deliberately insensitive pick or just an honest mistake, we would’ve erred on the side of caution and steered clear of a polemic word. 

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Maluma Teams Up With Luxury Brand Balmain For This Must-Have Fashion Collection

Entertainment

Maluma Teams Up With Luxury Brand Balmain For This Must-Have Fashion Collection

It’s 2021 and we have no shortage of epic collaborations between some of the world’s biggest Latino stars and top fashion brands. Everyone from J Balvin and Bad Bunny to Cardi B and now Maluma have entered the fashion industry to sell a lifestyle. And people are buying!

Maluma and French fashion house Balmain bring us a limited-edition collaboration.

Colombian superstar Maluma has partnered with French fashion house Balmain to launch a limited edition collection that will be available from April 12 through June 1 in all Balmain stores, including brick and mortar and online.

The collection, which includes sneakers, blazers, t-shirts, pants and other ready-to-wear clothing, will also be available at Saks Fifth Avenue as of April 15.

The Balmain + Maluma line marks the first time ever the brand has designed a line with a celebrity. And it seems like the brand’s creative designer is pretty excited about the collab. Through photos on his Instagram, Olivier Rousteing referred to the reggaetón singer as his inspiration, captioned with supportive laudatory messages about merging their cultures and joint design process.

“Maluma, more than him being an incredible singer,” Rousteing notes, “[brings] a lot to the fashion community with his joy and his happiness and the fact that he’s always playing up his style from different kinds of houses from around the world, mixing different cultures as well… I think the collaboration with Maluma is obviously giving to Balmain and pushing the aesthetic more internationally.”

Maluma also seems to be pumped for the opportunity!

Although Balmain has featured other celebrities in advertising campaigns and runway shows, it has never actually enlisted a celebrity to help design a full, name-branded line.

The brand’s high profile, along with the haute-couture retail price of the collection, underscores how entrenched Maluma is now in the global fashion world and how valuable his endorsement and name is perceived by high fashion.

“It’s been one of my goals to work with a respected fashion house on a collection, but this journey was more exciting, as Olivier pushed me to design with him and sketch looks that I personally will wear off the stage and showcase high couture with a bit of Papi Juancho,” says Maluma, referencing both his album name and alter ego.

But if you want a piece of the collection be prepared to drop those coins.

Credit: Phraa / Balmain

Items in the Balmain + Maluma collection range from a black cotton T-shirt that retails for $495, to $1,500 high top sneakers to a $2,555 multi-color print bomber jacket.

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Met Gala 2021 Is Happening And Amanda Gorman Is Set To Host The America-Themed Fashion Event

Entertainment

Met Gala 2021 Is Happening And Amanda Gorman Is Set To Host The America-Themed Fashion Event

It’s 2021 and the Met Gala is back this year – after being canceled in 2020 thanks to a pandemic – with superstar poet Amanda Gorman being eyed to host the fashion event of the year. Given the 23-year-old’s show-stopping performance at the inauguration, the theme fittingly will be a celebration of America and American designers.

The Met Gala will return in 2021 with a very special guest as host.

Vogue’s “Oscars of Fashion” famously takes place on the first Monday of May. However, this year it’s been pushed back to September 13, in hopes that life will have returned to something closer to normal by then.

Epic poet Amanda Gorman is reportedly in talks to co-host the event alongside Tom Ford, who is the academy’s president. The breakout star of President Biden’s inauguration, Gorman is on the cover of the magazine’s May issue and the subject of a relentlessly glowing profile inside.

The black-tie gala, which raises funds for Met’s Costume Institute, is normally fashion’s biggest night and sees guests from Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez and Cardi B to Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and even Maluma.

The event was canceled in 2020 thanks to a global pandemic.

The world’s most glamorous party was canceled in 2020 because of COVID-19, which was (and still is) raging the planet at the time. There was a virtual event in place of the 2020 event, with celebs like Julia Roberts, Priyanka Chopra and Amanda Seyfried showing off their looks from home and stars like Mindy Kaling and Adam Rippon taking part in the #MetGalaChallenge, recreating looks from past years.

This year’s event will draw inspiration from all things USA.

The theme of this year’s Met Gala has not been announced, but Page Six says the night will be devoted to honoring America and American designers, following the 18-month-long COVID crisis in this country.

Recent past themes for the event have included “Camp: Notes on Fashion” (2019), “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” (2018), and “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between (2017). And don’t forget 2016, when Zayn Malik wore robot-arms to Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.

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