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Some People Are Calling Out Makeup Companies For Crossing The Line Of Cheeky Names To Racial Tropes

We’ve never worked in the cosmetic industry, so we can only assume that finding the perfect name for a product can be tricky to say the least. There are products with hilarious, and even NSFW names —NARS we’re talking to you. Apparently, the more scandalous the product is named, the better. Even some of the most trendy cosmetics have cheeky names, so it seems like in the world of beauty, anything goes. From cheeky, to ridiculous to just down-right offensive, here are some names that left us wondering; who approved these?

1. Chantecaille Foundation in the shade; ’Banana’.

www.nordstrom.com

As opposed to the cute names appointed to lighter shades, such as “Aura” and “Vanilla;” the darker shade was named “Banana”. Now, maybe it’s just me, but giving a darker skin tone the name ‘banana’ sounds like a good enough reference to the monkey comparison. Comparing dark-skinned people to monkeys is a racial stance as old as America and we’d love to find out what the Chantecaille team was thinking when they gave that name to a dark skin tone —smdh.

2. Color Pop Cosmetics’ “Yikes” and “Typo” sculpting stix. 

www.colorpop.com

In the same way, as we noted in the previous example, here the lighter skin tones had names like “Castle” and “Dove,” whereas the darker ones were titled “Typo” and “Yikes.” Yikes, is there anything shocking or alarming about a darker skin tone? Nobody’s skin is a typo, Color Pop.

ColourPop issued an apology statement and quickly renamed the deeper shades. The Sculpting Stix as a whole has since been discontinued.

2. MAC Cosmetics’ “Vibe Tribe” Collection.

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I mean… do we have to keep saying this? Indigenous cultures are not fashion —or in this case beauty— trends. This 2016 collection was instantly accused of cultural appropriation and enforcing Native American stereotypes. The packaging of the collection featured ‘tribal’ patterns and the shades had names such as “Arrowhead” and “Call of the Canyon.” What’s worse, the campaign featured models wearing Native American headdresses —which we’ve established time and again, is disrespectful AF.

3. MAC Cosmetics x Rodarte “Juarez” polish.

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Ciudad Juarez is a city known for the phenomenon of female homicides, called feminicidio in Spanish. The city has been—famously, may I add—plagued by the violent deaths of hundreds of women and girls since 1993. MAC and fashion house Rodarte collaborated in a highly anticipated collection inspired by Mexico in 2010. One of the nail polishes in the collection was named ‘Juarez’, which disturbed customers and social media users. 

MAC apologized but kept the product on its shelves —guess they weren’t that sorry. The makeup brand did, however, “give a portion of the proceeds from the MAC Rodarte collection to help those in need in Juarez.”

4. The Balm’s “Meet Matt” eye shadow palette.

www.thebalm.com

Every shade in this eye shadow palette, which is still available under the site’s bestseller section, was named for a different “Matt,” and many found it’s choice of last names questionable. 

The brand paired the last names Lin, Lopez, Kumar, and Ahmed to yellow, brown, brick red, and black shades, which a lot of customers —ourselves included— found racist. 

5. Ben Nye’s Cream Character Base.

Back in 2015, Ben Nye, the special FX and stage makeup brand, sold a deep complexion base cream called “Minstrel Brown”. FYI —and get ready to have your mind blown— Minstrels were theatric shows performed by white actors in blackface during the 19th century. The shows were specifically intended to mock and degrade black people. 

Ben Nye renamed the shade —and every shade in the collection— but the brand never apologized or commented on the incredibly inappropriate name. 

6. “Iris I Was Thinner” OPI nail polish

www.makeupalley.com

Because women need to be reminded of the toxic beauty ideal that we ‘should strive to be thin’. This nail polish is a no from me, dog. 

7. “Miso Happy With This Color” OPI nail polish.

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We’ll admit that some of OPI’s nail polish color names make us giggle. But not when they’re making puns that suggest a stereotype of how Asians speak. According to portrayals in pop culture, an Asian face must mean an Asian accent — and often, the accent is for comedic effect in movies and television shows.

8. Fenty’s “Geisha Chic” highlighter

Instagram @trendmood1

Ok, we love queen RiRi but more often than not, Asian targeted racism gets glossed over and we’re not here for this name. A Geisha or ‘Geiko’ is a Japanese woman who entertains guests through talents such as dance, music, and singing —the tradition can be traced back centuries, and it’s not fair to minimize it. 

Fenty team members personally messaged the people that left comments about the product on Instagram and quickly pulled the highlighter from their online store. “We wanted to personally apologize. Thank you so much for educating us,” read their apology.

9. Wycon’s “Black As A N***a”

www.wyconcosmetics.com

At this point, I feel like brands are using racial insensitivity as a marketing ploy. Because in what world does it seem right to give a product —or anything else for the matter- this name? A quick scroll through the Italian beauty brand will leave you pressed to find any representation of people of color —but of course hip-hop culture is up for grabs when it comes to the naming of product shades for the brand, which also uses names like “Drop it Like It’s Hot” and “Bootylicious.” #cancelled

10. Kat Von D’s “Selektion” lipstick shade

twitter @thekatvond

Kat Von D has been accused of anti-semitism time and again, and I guess we’ll never know if it’s a real claim or if it’s just a product of Twitter users’ machinations. But one thing is true, her eponymous makeup line launched a lipstick shade with the name “Selektion,” which in German simply means “screening,” or “picking.” However, the use of the German word in English speek has become taboo due to the use it had by Nazis in the selection of prisoners for death in concentration camps. 

Whether the name was a deliberately insensitive pick or just an honest mistake, we would’ve erred on the side of caution and steered clear of a polemic word. 

Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

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Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

Remember the terrible days when “nude” shoes were on-trend and Black women everywhere were forced to take part in something that was meant for white women? Welp, the nude lip trend has done quite a bit of not so great favors for women of color as well. Fortunately, the black-owned beauty shop Whippd Cosmetics is blessing Black women with nude glosses that work for all of our skin tones.

On June 27, Rachel Robins the entrepreneur behind the Whippd brand announced that she’d be launching a line of nude glosses for Black women.

“I created 6 nude lip glosses made with black women in mind and I just want them to go viral! Twitter do your thing,” Robins wrote in a tweet that featured a video displaying the line with meltaonin-rich shades.

Soon enough, Twitter did do its thing and her post wrangled in over 50,000 likes and 26,000 retweets. Speaking to Teen Vogue Robins says she was “extremely shocked but also humbled” by the support she received from Twitter. “So many people messaged me about how the collection made them feel seen. It warmed my heart and was the extra boost I needed to keep going.”

Whippd Cosmetics’ first launch, called the Coco Collection, will include six different nude shades.

The glosses are rich with pigments that cater to Black women who are so often overlooked by beauty brands that still use words like “nude” to cover only a portion of the beauty market. After all, what big brands call “nude” typically works for white women only.

Speaking about her own personal experiences, Robins says she wanted to create nude lip glosses that cater specifically for Black women.

“My experience of trying to find the perfect nude lip color to match me was always unsuccessful,” Robins explained. “The colors I would use would either be too light, too dark or have a blaring red undertone. I would often have to mix together my own shades and I knew other black women have encountered the same issue while shopping for the perfect nude lip.”

The gloss shades launched on July 1st and are available on WhippdCosmetics.com.

The Coco Collection promises to “compliment your complexion” with colors that as sweet-sounding as their names are. From latte, amaretto, butterscotch to brown sugar, ebony, and truffle these shades will sweeten your heart. While the entire collection costs $48, each gloss goes for $10.

If Whippd’s new gloss line isn’t exciting enough, you’ll likely fall in love with their line of body butters and scrubs which are infused with essential oils.

Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

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Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

Mat Szwajkos / Getty

When it comes to buying products we all have a responsibility to know where our dollars go.

And while in the world of beauty it might seem a bit tricky to be conscientious of animal rights and our planet… it’s so essential. Fortunately, Sephora agrees and their latest announcement confirms it!

Recently, Sephora announced that it would no longer sell mink-based lashes online or in-store in an effort to combat animal cruelty.

Speaking to Allure this week, the big-box beauty store announced that they had started 2020 with efforts to phase mink lashes out of its stock. This week, after animal rights activist organization PETA launched a campaign demanding that the brand do so, the retailer confirmed that when it comes to false eyelashes they are going completely mink-free.

“Following a PETA campaign and emails from more than 280,000 concerned shoppers, Sephora has confirmed that it has banned mink-fur eyelashes and will purchase only synthetic or faux-fur lashes going forward,” PETA shared in a statement about the decision.

In a graphic video about the trading and selling of mink fur which is often used for coats and fake eyelashes, the organization urged Sephora to stop selling the beauty product.

*Warning this video is graphic*

The organization lambasted fur farms in its statement saying “As PETA pointed out in its letters to Sephora, mink fur typically comes from fur farms, where stressed minks frantically pace and circle endlessly inside cramped wire cages and many languish from infections or broken or malformed limbs. Some minks even self-mutilate as a result of the intensive confinement, chewing into their own limbs or tails. At the end of their miserable lives, they’re gassed or electrocuted or their necks are broken.”

Confirming their decision to take mink off of its shelves, Sephora wrote in a statement that they “have always been committed to upholding the highest standards of beauty, and we take our responsibility to communicate transparently and honestly with our clients about the products we carry seriously.”

The brand went on to say that they shared with PETA “earlier this year we had already decided to begin phasing mink products out of our assortment in 2020. We have only ever offered products our clients can trust and we stand by the people and partners who have made the Sephora experience what it is today.”