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The Morning After Pill Is Illegal In Honduras But The Campaign Hablemos Lo Que Es Is Hoping To Change That Law

Some ignorant people may wonder why so many women in Honduras would risk having children in a country with so much violence — only to risk their lives even more by seeking asylum in the U.S.

The answer is very cut and dry, women in Honduras are subjected to give birth because their country doesn’t provide them with the basic contraceptives that we take for granted in the U.S. Furthermore, many of the pregnancies in that county are the result of rape.

There is at least one organization trying to help these women.

A campaign called Hablemos Lo Que Es (Let’s talk about what it is) is trying to change the government’s perception of the morning after pill, which is banned in Honduras.

Facebook/@hablemosloques

The campaign is attempting to show that the morning after pill doesn’t cause abortion but rather prevent an unplanned pregnancy.
“Access to the PAE [the morning after pill] in the case of a mistake or the failure of another form of contraception should be a plan B — another option,” Alexa Pineda told Al Jazeera. “[Having access to the PAE] is about the right to decide what to do with your sex life, the right to decide about motherhood and the right to decide about your life. That’s why Honduran women should have free access to PAE: because it’s our right to decide what to do with our bodies.”

In 2017, “more than 30,000 pregnancies among girls and adolescents under the age of 20” were recorded in Honduras, making it one of “the highest rates of teen pregnancy in Latin America.”

Facebook/@hablemosloques

The publication reports that because many of the pregnant women do not have fully developed bodies, their childbirth poses a great risk to their lives and the lives of the babies. The report also states that 80 percent of the women who were treated by Doctors Without Borders, got pregnant after being raped.

One woman reports having gone to a pharmacy outside of her vicinity after she heard that someone there was selling the morning after pill.

Facebook/@hablemosloques

She told Al Jazeera that she went to great lengths to find this one pharmacy and pay $12 for the morning after pill and was only able to pay for it because her boyfriend helped her with the cost.

“I can’t even imagine how it would be for a woman who didn’t have all the privileges that I had in that moment,” the woman said to the publication. “She wouldn’t even have a choice. Her destiny would be to be a mother.”

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Meghan Markle Reveals She Had a Miscarriage Earlier This Year

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Meghan Markle Reveals She Had a Miscarriage Earlier This Year

Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

In a heartbreaking essay titled “The Losses We Share” written for The New York Times, Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, revealed that she had a miscarriage earlier this year. It was not public knowledge that she was pregnant.

The essay describes where she was and what she was doing the moment it happened.

“It was a July morning that began as ordinarily as any other day: Make breakfast. Feed the dogs. Take vitamins. Find that missing sock. Pick up the rogue crayon that rolled under the table. Throw my hair in a ponytail before getting my son from his crib,” she wrote.

“After changing his diaper, I felt a sharp cramp. I dropped to the floor with him in my arms, humming a lullaby to keep us both calm, the cheerful tune a stark contrast to my sense that something was not right. I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second.”

Markle went on to describe the “almost unbearable grief” that she and her husband, Prince Harry, experienced in the aftermath of her miscarriage.

“Sitting in a hospital bed, watching my husband’s heart break as he tried to hold the shattered pieces of mine, I realized that the only way to begin to heal is to first ask, “Are you OK?”

The essay goes on to talk about the trauma of loss that so many have experienced in 2020–first through the coronavirus pandemic, then through witnessing on onslaught of racial violence in a tumultuous summer, then through an acrimonious, divisive election cycle.

“This year has brought so many of us to our breaking points,” she wrote. “Loss and pain have plagued every one of us in 2020, in moments both fraught and debilitating.”

She ended the piece on a hopeful note, describing the bittersweet unity that humankind is experiencing in the face of such shared hardships.

“We are adjusting to a new normal where faces are concealed by masks, but it’s forcing us to look into one another’s eyes–sometimes filled with warmth, other times with tears. For the first time, in a long time, as human beings, we are really seeing one another. Are we OK? We will be.”

Meghan Markle’s is now part of the growing movement of female public figures destigmatizing pregnancy loss.

In September, Chrissy Teigen revealed on social media that she was going to the hospital due to pregnancy complications. Hours later, she shared with the world: “Driving home from the hospital with no baby. How can this be real?”

Teigen went on to write an essay on Medium about why she took pictures of her pregnancy loss experience and chose to share them with the world: “I lived it, I chose to do it, and more than anything, these photos aren’t for anyone but the people who have lived this or are curious enough to wonder what something like this is like,” she said. “These photos are only for the people who need them.”

Teigen went on to ask women who have had similar experiences to hers to not be afraid of sharing their stories with the world: “The worst part is knowing there are so many women that won’t get these quiet moments of joy from strangers. I beg you to please share your stories and to please be kind to those pouring their hearts out. Be kind in general, as some won’t pour them out at all.”

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Two Weeks Ago He Lost His Home To Hurricane Eta And Now Hurricane Iota Threatens His Entire Community

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Two Weeks Ago He Lost His Home To Hurricane Eta And Now Hurricane Iota Threatens His Entire Community

WENDELL ESCOTO/AFP via Getty Images

Once again, the year 2020 is delivering a shocker but this time it‘s in the form of devastation caused by a record-breaking hurricane season. So far, the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane season, which is set to end on Nov. 30, has had 30 named storms, 13 of them hurricanes. And six of those hurricanes were considered “major”— Eta and Iota among them — meaning they were Category 3 or higher.

Meteorologists have been forced to use the Greek alphabet to name the new systems after having exhausted the 21-name list that is prepared for each hurricane season. The last time the Greek alphabet was used was in 2005, when there were 28 storms strong enough to be named.

Now, as Hurricane Iota ravages Central America, it’s becoming clear that an imminent humanitarian catastrophe is setting up across the region.

Hurricane Iota is ravaging Central America just two weeks after communities there were hit by Hurricane Eta.

Late on Monday, Hurricane Iota made landfall as a powerful and “extremely dangerous” Category 4 hurricane. Aside form the catastrophic winds and life-threatening storm surge, the hurricane is impacting already devastated communities recently hit by Hurricane Eta.

People across Central America will feel the impacts of this record breaking storm, which is expected to produce up to 30 inches of rain in some areas of Nicaragua and Honduras through Friday. The intense rainfall could lead to significant flash flooding and mudslides in higher elevations, the hurricane center said.

Dozens of Indigenous communities were evacuated throughout the weekend in Nicaragua and Honduras, where the military shared pictures on Twitter of soldiers helping people out of stilted wooden homes and carrying them to safety. One of the soldiers stood in knee deep water, holding a resident’s pink backpack in the same arm as his service weapon.

The forecast, at least, offers some hope for those in Iota’s path. The National Hurricane Center expects the storm to rapidly weaken over the next 36 hours as it moves toward El Salvador across the mountainous terrain of inland Nicaragua and Honduras.

Honduras was hit particularly hard by Hurricane Eta.

Central America is still reeling from Hurricane Eta, which struck less than two weeks ago and made landfall about 15 miles from where Iota did. Aid workers are still struggling to reach communities cut off by washed-out bridges, downed trees and flooded roads.

According to the Red Cross, more than 3.6 million people across the region have been affected by the storms.

Antonio Herrera told Mitú in an interview that his modest home had already been reduced to rubble by Eta. Herrera and his daughter were staying in an improvised shelter but it’s directly in the path of Hurricane Iota. A GoFundMe has been setup to help Herrera and his family recover from the devastation wrought by both hurricanes.

“This Hurricane Iota is a monster,” he said. “After Eta and the damaged it caused, I’m afraid for all of us.”

Herrera added that even without a disaster devastating the region, Honduras is a country where half the population doesn’t have enough food to eat. And now, because of Hurricane Eta, Herrera counts himself among that group of Hondurans.

He adds that, “Honduras is a challenging place just to make sure that the everyday needs are met. And of course, all of this happening during a global pandemic — no possibility of social distancing, obviously, in those sheltering situations.”

Many Central American leaders are blaming climate change for the disasters and are seeking international aid.

Credit: Josue Decavele/Getty Images

As the region is pummeled by storm after storm, the leaders of Honduras and Guatemala have called for in increase in international funding to help combat the effects of climate change – which are having an outsized impact on the region.

“Central America is not the producer of this climate change situation,” the president of Honduras, Juan Orlando Hernández, said at a news conference. “Instead, we are the most affected.”

President Orlando has called on the United Nations to declare Central America as the region most affected by climate change worldwide.

“Hunger, poverty and destruction do not have years to wait,” said Alejandro Giammattei, the Guatemalan leader. “If we don’t want to see hordes of Central Americans looking to go to countries with a better quality of life, we have to create walls of prosperity in Central America.”

Disclaimer: The author of this story has a personal connection with Antonio Herrera, a victim of these storms in Honduras mentioned in this story. The GoFundMe for Herrera was created before this story was written but was included as many GoFundMe fundraisers are when relevant.

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