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The Morning After Pill Is Illegal In Honduras But The Campaign Hablemos Lo Que Es Is Hoping To Change That Law

Some ignorant people may wonder why so many women in Honduras would risk having children in a country with so much violence — only to risk their lives even more by seeking asylum in the U.S.

The answer is very cut and dry, women in Honduras are subjected to give birth because their country doesn’t provide them with the basic contraceptives that we take for granted in the U.S. Furthermore, many of the pregnancies in that county are the result of rape.

There is at least one organization trying to help these women.

A campaign called Hablemos Lo Que Es (Let’s talk about what it is) is trying to change the government’s perception of the morning after pill, which is banned in Honduras.

Facebook/@hablemosloques

The campaign is attempting to show that the morning after pill doesn’t cause abortion but rather prevent an unplanned pregnancy.
“Access to the PAE [the morning after pill] in the case of a mistake or the failure of another form of contraception should be a plan B — another option,” Alexa Pineda told Al Jazeera. “[Having access to the PAE] is about the right to decide what to do with your sex life, the right to decide about motherhood and the right to decide about your life. That’s why Honduran women should have free access to PAE: because it’s our right to decide what to do with our bodies.”

In 2017, “more than 30,000 pregnancies among girls and adolescents under the age of 20” were recorded in Honduras, making it one of “the highest rates of teen pregnancy in Latin America.”

Facebook/@hablemosloques

The publication reports that because many of the pregnant women do not have fully developed bodies, their childbirth poses a great risk to their lives and the lives of the babies. The report also states that 80 percent of the women who were treated by Doctors Without Borders, got pregnant after being raped.

One woman reports having gone to a pharmacy outside of her vicinity after she heard that someone there was selling the morning after pill.

Facebook/@hablemosloques

She told Al Jazeera that she went to great lengths to find this one pharmacy and pay $12 for the morning after pill and was only able to pay for it because her boyfriend helped her with the cost.

“I can’t even imagine how it would be for a woman who didn’t have all the privileges that I had in that moment,” the woman said to the publication. “She wouldn’t even have a choice. Her destiny would be to be a mother.”

A Teenage Football Player In Indiana Has Been Sentenced To Prison For Killing A Cheerleader Pregnant With His Baby

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A Teenage Football Player In Indiana Has Been Sentenced To Prison For Killing A Cheerleader Pregnant With His Baby

St. Joseph County Police Department

An Indiana teenager has confessed to killing a fellow student because she was too far along in her term pregnancy to have an abortion. Aaron Trejo was 16 years old when he and 17-year-old Breana Rouhselang started up the cliche football player-cheerleader romance that unwittingly resulted in a pregnancy. Trejo, a then-member in good standing of the school’s football team, was angry that Rouhselang waited until she was six months pregnant to tell him that he was the father. According to court documents, neither one of them wanted the child, but Trejo took matters into his own hands and spent a week planning her murder.

In December 2018, Trejo confessed to the murder. On Tuesday, he was sentenced to 65 years in prison for homicide and feticide.

Aaron Trejo stabbed her, choked her with her scarf and put her body in a dumpster.

CREDIT: ST. JOSEPH COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT

In December 2018, Trejo entered a ‘not guilty’ plea for the homicide of Rouhselang and for the feticide of their fetus. Earlier that week, police found Rouhselang’s body in a dumpster after she was reported missing. Rouhselang told her mom that she was going to meet Trejo around behind their Mishawaka home around 11 p.m. When her mom woke up a few hours later, around 1 a.m., she was concerned that Rouhselang was still not back. She went over to Trejo’s home, a few blocks away, to ask where Rouhselang was, but he told her that she never showed up to talk in the alley behind her home. He also told Rouhselang’s mother that he lost his phone and that she wouldn’t be able to reach him.

Investigators found Rouhselang’s glasses and a “stocking cap” that belonged to Rouhselang. “There was apparent blood on the hat,” a probable cause affidavit said.  Investigators searched the premises and businesses nearby and found her body in a dumpster with a black plastic garbage bag placed over her head and torso.

Trejo was brought in for questioning and within a few hours confessed to the whole thing.

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

The investigator who interrogated Trejo said in an affidavit that “there were several pauses and quiet times” during the questioning. Soon enough, he asked Trejo if they ever fought about the pregnancy, to which “Aaron Trejo quietly said, ‘Yes.’ Aaron then explained that Breana waited too long to tell Aaron about the pregnancy to get an abortion,” according to the affidavit. When the detective asked Trejo “what he did about that,” he replied, “I took action … I took her life.”

Trejo had plotted to kill Rouhselang for a week. He brought a knife and a garbage bag from his home over to the alley behind her house where they were to meet and stabbed her in the heart. He thought that using a knife would kill her quickly. “Trejo said that he had been planning and thinking about killing Breana and the baby for about a week and had not told anybody,” the affidavit states. Trejo threw Rouhselang’s phone and knife into the river after he threw her body into a dumpster.

Autopsy reports found that she was also strangled with her own scarf.

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

The autopsy confirmed that she died from multiple stab wounds and that “her scarf had been tied so tightly that strangulation was occurring before Breana died.” Rouhselang’s own father and stepmother had no idea that she was pregnant. “We’re just in shock, really. We’re in disbelief that this is going on,”  Breana’s stepmom, Nicole Rouhselang, told ABC. “I woke up this morning and wanted to send her a text. But, there’d be nobody on the other end.”

Trejo’s family has since been bombarded with hate messages on social media, but his aunt, Alexzaundra Patton-Manu told the New York Post that “We just want everybody to stop trying to harass everybody in our family. We didn’t do nothing wrong.” Patton-Mandu added that Trejo had suffered a “bad concussion” a few months prior and “that could have messed with his mind.” 

Breana Rouhselang has been remembered as a “precious, beautiful, innocent, well-loved young woman.”

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

Rouhselang’s obituary cites that her baby would have been a girl, to be named Aurora MacKenzie Rouhselang. She was looking forward to receiving a letter at a sports banquet the afternoon after she was murdered, and planned to study athletic training in college. Breana Rouhselang was Mishawaka High School’s football team manager, a softball coach and a cheerleader. 

READ: A Man Didn’t Like How Slow Mexican Authorities Were Investigating So He Solved His Father’s Murder

Seven Men Sentenced To Up To 50 Years For The Murder Of Honduran Environmental Activist Berta Caceres

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Seven Men Sentenced To Up To 50 Years For The Murder Of Honduran Environmental Activist Berta Caceres

Berta Caceres Flores / Facebook

Seven men were sentenced to up to 50 years in prison in a Honduras court on Monday for the 2016 murder of the environmental activist Berta Caceres. Four of the men, Elvin Rápalo, Henry Hernández, Edilson Duarte, and Oscar Torres Velásquez, who were identified as the hitmen hired to shoot Caceres dead in her own home, were sentenced to 34 years in prison each.

An additional 16 years and four months were handed down to them for the attempted murder of Mexican environmentalist Gustavo Castro, who was also with Caceres during the shooting. Three more prison terms of 30 years were handed down to other individuals that played a part in the murder including an officer, an ex-soldier, and a manager of the dam project that Caceres opposed. The three men reportedly paid the four gunmen $4,000 to kill Caceres because of her activism work. 

The slaying of Berta Caceres, then-45, brought international outrage and protests as she became a well-known women’s rights defender and indigenous lands rights activist. 

Caceras, a member of the Lenca indigenous community, may not have been a household name but her impact in the world of environmental rights was certainly felt. She was one of the co-founders of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras, a grassroots organization that advocates for the rights of indigenous people. Caceras gained notoriety by protesting the company Desarrollos Energeticos (DESA), which had planned to create the $50 million Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam across from the Gualcarque River. Various indigenous communities depend on the river staying clean and healthy and free-flowing to sustain their communities.

“The river is like blood running through your veins. It’s unjust. Not only is it unjust, it’s a crime to attack a river that has life, that has spirits,” Caceres told Aljazeera in 2016. 

The building of the dam would have had major impact on water, food and medicine for her Lenca people and even caused flooding. One of her successful protests included placing a roadblock that halted construction workers from reaching the dam building site. After almost 10 years of opposition, the Chinese state-owned company Sinohydro, who was jointly developing the dam project with DESA, pulled out of the project citing community resistance. 

Her activism and work in stopping the building of the dam gave Caceres notoriety and international attention. Caceres was awarded the Goldman environmental prize in 2015 for her role in preventing the building of the dam. The project was suspended shortly following her untimely death.

Authorities have connected her death directly to her activism work against the failed dam project.

The individuals behind the death of Caceres were connected to executives that were connected to DESA and the failed dam project. The reasoning behind the plotted murder was due to multiple delays and financial losses that were linked to protests that Caceres was behind. Back in November 2018, a Honduran court convicted the seven men for the attack. 

“From the outset, the path to justice has been painful, as our rights as victims have not been respected. These sentences are a start in breaking the impunity, but we’re going to make every effort to ensure that all those responsible – the company executives and state officials identified in the trial – are prosecuted,” Bertita Zúñiga, Cáceres’ second-eldest daughter, said after the men were charged on Monday. 

While Caceres’ family is happy to see some justice be delivered, Zúñiga still believes the real culprits behind her the murder still on the loose. She has previously blamed the Atala-Zablah family, a well-known Honduran business group and DESA shareholders, as the ones behind her mother’s murder. 

“This is a day of pain because the intellectual authors of my mother’s murder are still enjoying impunity,” Zuniga said to reporters. “We are not going to believe that there’s true justice until these people are in jail.”

Despite this tragedy, Zuniga is not letting her mother’s legacy go to waste.

The message that Caceres spread of protecting indigenous communities still lives on according to her daughter, who continues to do similar work. She is committed to keeping her mother’s legacy alive and remembers her for the amazing impact she had on marginalized communities around the globe. 

“I remember her as a hardworking person. But I also remember her with a big smile on her face, because I believe that this struggle cannot be just to martyrize ourselves. We fight with joy and hope because if we do not, more than half of the struggle is lost,” Zúñiga told EarthJustice. “We always say that the image of my mother multiplied because we found her present in the struggle of so many women from so many communities who continue to fight very hard.

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