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The Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show Was Cancelled For 2019 And We’re Pretty Much Fine With That

Since 1995, fans of the big time lingerie brand Victoria’s Secret have tuned into its lavish annual show wherein models for the brand to display its most elaborate costume lingerie. But now it’s goodbye angels, bedazzled bras and wings and memes. 

This year the Victoria’s Secret Fashion brand has announced that it has officially canceled this year’s show.

The internet launched into a frenzy last week when it was announced that this year’s show was canceled. 

According to reports, Stuart B. Burgdoerfer, chief financial officer and executive vice president of the brand’s parent company L Brands, announced last Thursday morning during a conference call with analysts that the show had been canceled. According to Variety, the decision to cancel show was out of a desire to appeal to the “evolve the marketing.” In a write up by Variety it is aid that the Burgdoerfer underlined that the show had no ” immediate impact on sales of its bras and underwear.”

“Did we see specific material impact on short-term sales response to the airing of the fashion show, as a general matter the answer to that question is no,” Burgdoerfer said during the conference call. “So if you’re like, ‘Oh my God, Stuart, are you freaked out about the day after the fashion show result and what’s going to happen?’, it did air at different times over the years and we didn’t see a material impact on the next few days’ results.”

Users online were quick to show the divisiveness of the decision with comments on Twitter.

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A decadent treat: longline bras in sumptuous satin.

A post shared by Victoria's Secret (@victoriassecret) on

The  bombshell announcement that the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show has been canceled has caused internet mayhem. While supporters of the brand refused to accept the brand’s cancellation of the show others argued that the brand’s show has proven to be consistently problematic. In fact, two years ago, the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show proved to be plagued by a series of hot messes almost from the start.

First, various models and talent meant to be featured in the show, which took place in Shanghai, failed to secure visas, including model Gigi Hadid. Though her absence was suspected to be over racist behavior. Then media outlets and bloggers had a hard time getting permission from Chinese bureaucrats to film the event at all.

Once the show aired, it was filled with some pretty cringeworthy moments of cultural appropriation, models caught singing the N-word, no models above a size 4 and a TV edit that has Twitter and Chrissy Tiegan epically POed. It felt more like a shit show than fashion show.

On top of this, the brand’s annual show also has been under constant criticism 

Stuck in an early era that beckons back to the early 2000s when the show started and brands hadn’t quite yet embraced body positivity, Victoria Secret failed to embraces models of all sizes, ethnicities, and abilities on their runway. The underwear company has been accused of not hiring women of color — especially dark women — for their campaigns. Last year the manufacturer gained criticism after the company’s chief marketing officer Ed Razek of Victoria’s Secret’s parent company made disparaging and anti-trans comments in an interview with Vogue magazine. During the conversation Razek rejected the idea that Victoria Secret would ever have a trans women walk on its runway. “No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy.”

For the most part users against the brand’s hiring practices applauded their decision to rebrand.

Speaking about the decision a Twitter user replied  “hopefully rebranding means a wider range of sizes and a more diverse slew of models,” a sentiment that other users agreed with. 

“I agree. Honestly, after watching Rihanna‘s SavageXFenty show and seeing the diversity in skin tones, shapes, ethnicities, and the actual performance level, I wasn’t even planning on watching the Victoria’s Secret show,” added another, referencing Rihanna‘s highly-inclusive lingerie fashion show in September. Another user said, “Good. It’s time for them to rebrand, bc their entire image is early 2000’s and non-inclusive.”

“people are real life upset about transphobic/fatphobic ass victoria’s secret show getting cancelled as if there aren’t better shows happening now and in the future(fenty),” another user wrote.

Avid fans of the brand and its show decried the decision saying it was one made over fear of sensitivity.

“ever since Victoria’s Secret cancelled their fashion show every skinny basic white girl has been poppin out of nowhere to let us know they’re transphobic/fatphobic with no shame lol. Victoria’s Secret hasn’t been cool since yoga pants freshman year of high school. Get over it,” one user asserted.

“Canceling the Victoria Secret fashion show bc it showcases ‘unrealistic beauty standards’ is f—ing ridiculous lmfaaoo those girls work so hard to be on that stage. The level of sensitivity is absurd,” one user wrote.“Because ppl are so sensitive nowadays the Victoria secret fashion show got cancelled ? I’m pissed,” another replied.

Others slammed the amount of attention the cancelation has been receiving. 

“the fact the Victoria’s Secret fashion show being cancelled has more media coverage than A FUCKING PURGE HAPPENING IN CALI COLOMBIA shows how South American Countries are put into minorities, please change this ITS DISGUSTING #prayforcolombiaanother user replied.

Which is… tbh a pretty good point.

During his announcement on Thursday, Burgdoerfer said that their upcoming marketing plans for VS will not be “similar in magnitude to the fashion show.”

“We recognize and appreciate that the communication of the brand, the offerings, the emotional content of Victoria’s Secret is obviously an important thing,” Burgdoerfer said in his announcement Thursday.“[The show] was a very important part of the brand-building of this business and was an important aspect of the brand and a remarkable marketing achievement… And with that said, we’re figuring out how to advance the positioning of the brand and best communicate that to customers and that’s among the things that [Victoria’s Secret chief executive officer] John [Mehas] is focused on.”

David Zambrano of “DezCustomz” Talks to Us About Family, Art, And When He Finally Thought He’d “Made It”

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David Zambrano of “DezCustomz” Talks to Us About Family, Art, And When He Finally Thought He’d “Made It”

dezcustomz/ Instagram

David Zambrano isn’t your madre’s artist. Zambrano, the owner of DEZ Customz Art, is part of the new guard of artists and content creators on the internet who march to the beat of their own drum. The LA-born and DC-based artist and shoe customizer (known as Dez to his customers) started his art career customizing cars before he pivoted to shoes. Although Zambrano will be the first to tell you that his journey to success was long and difficult, he worked at his dream long enough to become the shoe-customizer to the stars. You can see Zambrano’s artful customizations of sneakers, cleats, and high tops on countless all-star athletes, from Tom Brady to Stephen Curry. 

But his client roster isn’t the only thing worth being impressed by. Zambrano boasts 115,000 followers on Instagram, landing him squarely in social media influencer territory (even if he doesn’t like the term).  A quick scroll through Zambrano’s page will expose you to the depths of his talent. Recently, we had a chance to talk to this Latino visionary about family, artistic integrity, and why he doesn’t think of himself as an “influencer”.

M: Tell us a little about your process–where do you get your ideas from? Do they come to you naturally or do you have to brainstorm them?

DZ: I get inspiration from everywhere. When customers come to us for work, we have to cater to their requests. I love taking their ideas and making one-of-a-kind pieces from them. I love graffiti art. A lot of my canvas works have elements of graffiti art in them. I’ve always loved that style.

M: How did you get into customization?

DZ: My road to success has been a rough one. It didn’t really take off until I was in my late 30s. It’s a long story, but I’ll give you the short version. It was a fortunate combination of incredible circumstances. I’ve always been in art. At the time, I had tried to start a few art-focused businesses and they all failed. I had resigned myself to the fact that art would be a hobby for me. I was managing a body shop and painting artwork on cars, helmets, and motorcycles. A kid approached me via a phone call and we started to work together customizing shoes. He brought me clients and I did the artwork. We were invited to NY Sneaker Con for the first-ever Ace of Customs Competition and we won. That was the beginning of it all. 

M: What did you think when your designs first started to gain attention online?

DZ: The first time you see your work on a sports broadcast, or really anywhere, is crazy. One of the first times was when I did cleats for London Fletcher for his last game in the NFL. It got picked up all over the place–images were on the news. It was crazy. Another time I did cleats for AJ Green of The Bengals. It hit everywhere, sports blogs and everything. It was all surreal. I was among some of the first customizers to have their work picked up online through multiple media outlets and on TV. It was crazy. It still is really cool when the work gets picked up.

M: Can you tell us about the time when you first thought to yourself, “I’ve made it”?

DZ: It took so long to believe that I was even okay in this business. So many failures make you doubt and even resist success. I was always waiting for the rug to get pulled out from under me. I was always prepared to go back to work for someone else. I had kids and couldn’t afford to be prideful. So it took about 2-3 years of steady business for me to believe I had made it. It’s weird to even say it now.

M: What did you think when your designs first started to gain attention online?

DZ: The first time you see your work on a sports broadcast, or really anywhere, is crazy. One of the first times was when I did cleats for London Fletcher for his last game in the NFL. It got picked up all over the place–images were on the news. It was crazy. Another time I did cleats for AJ Green of The Bengals. It hit everywhere, sports blogs and everything. It was all surreal. I was among some of the first customizers to have their work picked up online through multiple media outlets and on TV. It was crazy. It still is really cool when the work gets picked up.

M: Can you tell us about the time when you first thought to yourself, “I’ve made it”?

@dezcustomz/Instagram

DZ: It took so long to believe that I was even okay in this business. So many failures make you doubt and even resist success. I was always waiting for the rug to get pulled out from under me. I was always prepared to go back to work for someone else. I had kids and couldn’t afford to be prideful. So it took about 2-3 years of steady business for me to believe I had made it. It’s weird to even say it now.

M: Why do you think people resonate with your work?

DZ: The reason I feel the work resonates with people is that they see the detail, pride, and passion. Another reason I think is that I don’t make my personal life some weird secret. I post my failures, my struggles, about the love I have for my family, my kids, my life and art. I think people like to see that. I think when you’re human, people find it easy to root for you. At least I hope they do. I always tell people: if you knew what I’ve been through, you would cheer for me! I really believe that. I have suffered for this craft. There was a time my family had to move three times in three years because I couldn’t make the rent. The last time, my son was only one year old. I had to be away from him for a month because of the living situation. It killed me. 99.9% of people wouldn’t go through that, no matter how much they love something. I’ve shed blood and tears for this. I feel like that comes out in everything I do artistically.

M: Of all the shoes you’ve worked on, what’s your personal favorite?

@dezcustomz/Instagram

DZ: Choosing one shoe as my favorite is sincerely an impossible question to answer. I have so many favorites. There are some that have emotional ties, others that have just been very near to me, like a favorite show or movie, actor or character. I’ve done portraits of people that have died, those always hit me hard. So yeah, really it’s impossible to say.  

M: When you first committed to this career path, were there any people in your life who didn’t believe you could make a living off of customizing shoes? How did you overcome self-doubt?

DZ: Committing to this was hard because of the failures that I had already experienced, some of which I mentioned earlier. I was constantly worried that I would let my family down. Incredibly, my wife had the most faith. She pushed me, and that meant a lot. More people doubted me than the number of people that thought it was possible. That fueled me. That gave me all the resiliency I needed to keep going. And honestly, for me, God. I believe that a person like me is blessed with a life like this only through the grace of God. I don’t push my faith on anyone, but that’s what I believe wholeheartedly.

M: On your Instagram, you’ve spoken a lot about how important art is to you. Was there ever a time you turned down a commission based off of your own artistic integrity? What would make you refuse a customer?

@dezcustomz/Instagram

DZ: We don’t turn down too many works as long as we’re allowed to be creative. There are occasions where we have, though. Simply, we don’t copy work. We won’t recreate something that someone else has already done. I won’t create hate art either. I won’t create something that relates hate towards another human.

M: Who are some Latino artists that you look up to as role models?

DZ: I don’t think I could name a favorite artist. To be honest, I have a fascination with all things art. I respect so many artists that I would not feel comfortable naming any, even a couple. I take influence and inspiration from everything I see. I think as artists, we simply see things more vividly, we feel things deeper. That’s what brings the art out.  

M: What exciting things do you have planned for your next career move and your future as an influencer?

@dezcustomz/Instagram

DZ: I have no idea what the future holds. In all honesty, whatever I do I know that art has to be involved. In a perfect world, I would be more focused on canvas work, interior murals, and tattoos. I don’t see myself as an influencer. I think that word is overused and I feel like it waters down an individual. I see some influencers post constantly and ‘create’ content constantly because of the pressure to stay relevant, but in doing so the product suffers. I sometimes don’t post for days. And that’s ok. I’ll post when I create something that inspires me to post. 

M: What would you tell fans of yours who are looking to follow in your footsteps as shoe artist, content creator, and an influencer?

DZ: I would tell anyone looking to become a shoe customizer or simply creating art, period, be true to the art. Never do it for popularity, likes, attention etc. Value your skill and people will learn to value it. And if they don’t, then that’s not a reflection of you.   

This New Hello Kitty Birthday Line Will Help You ‘Celebrate’ Her 45th Birthday

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This New Hello Kitty Birthday Line Will Help You ‘Celebrate’ Her 45th Birthday

Hello Kitty decided to big this year for her 45th birthday by collaborating with a Korean beauty brand to create the ultimate a skincare collection. In honor of the beloved Sanrio Japanese cartoon cat, who was first introduced to audiences in 1974, Korean skincare brand The Créme Shop has created a new line called Celebrate. All eight of the new line’s select products are focused primarily on skincare and add up to an entire regimen that start from face cleansing to makeup preparation.  

With all of the products holding a $20 max tag price, we’re pretty sure this new line guarantees price effective products that you don’t want to miss out on.

Hello Kitty Complete Cleansing Towelettes

thecremeshop / Instagram

There’s no doubt that makeup remover wipes are highly debated about beauty product. BUT if you are a fan of the easy off wipes, you might just get a real kick out of these strawberry rose-scented babies. Especially because they can even remove waterproof makeup! – $6

Brightening Apple Essence Serum

For the chica trying to stave away aging and wrinkles, this vitamin E packed serum could be the answer. Loaded with an “apple essence” and ceramides serum this product is meant to retain moisture. The instructions say to use five drops of the serum before applying to your skin that was washed.- $15

Pink Water Crème – Ultra Dewy Face Cream

Like the other fruitful scents in this line, Hello Kitty’s watermelon-infused moisturizer is loaded with hyaluronic acid and rich antioxidants and is meant to help reduce fine lines and promote a JLO-like glow. – $20

Under Eye Patches – Hydrogel Patches, Soothing & Brightening, Collagen + Caviar

thecremeshop / Instagram

Even though Hello Kitty’s under-eye patches are made with collagen and caviar might seem too fancy to be true but the $5   masks promise to alleviate dark circles and puffiness. The instructions say to keep the masks on for 15 minutes on freshly cleansed skin and gently press dry. – $5

Hello Kitty Celebrate Plush Spa Teddy Headband

Ahh, the venda. So heavily relied on but so under-appreciated for what it does to your skin-care and beauty routines. Hello Kitty’s Plush Spa headband isn’t just adorable for all of its logo designs but its material will totally make you feel as if you’re in a spa.  – $9

Hello Kitty Celebrate Setting & Priming Spray

This rose water and diamond essence priming spray will prep your skin and have it ready for your makeup routine when it comes time for application. For a dewy moisturized base, spray the water onto your skin after you’ve cleansed and moisturized. Once you’ve applied your makeup spray the product on afterward. – $14

Hello Kitty Celebrate Youth Promoting Sheet Mask

thecremeshop / Instagram

This cute Hello Kitty donut sheet mask looks tasty and delicious like a birthday treat. Infused with collagen, cucumber, and white tea to ensure a glowing and brighter complexion this product from Hello Kitty’s birthday collection is a guaranteed gift. – $4

Hello Kitty Celebrate Whipped Cacao Handy Dandy Hand Cream

Big-time fans of Hello Kitty know that The Créme Shop has a history of creating hand creams, but this one from the Celebrate collection is 100% for keeps.  The whipped cacao scented hand cream is enriched with vitamin E and shea butter for a lovely and subtle chocolate smell that will help to moisturize dry skin. A big plus? The 1.6 oz. bottle is travel-friendly. $10

Hello Kitty Holographic Clarifying Peel-Off Mask

Minimize your pores and blackheads with this apple and rose-scented clarifying peel mask that promises to also remove oil, and dirt right from your pores. For the most effective results be sure to keep the mask on for 15 minutes after cleansing and toning skin. – $12

Hello Kitty Treat Yo’ Self Spa Set

To really kick off celebrations for the beloved white cat go all out with your pampering and go for Hello Kitty’s boxset spa collection. The box includes a sleep mask, the spa headband, and strawberry champagne-scented bath crystals. – $20