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The Best Tributes To Selena Devoted Fans Of The Reina Made This Year

At the height of her fame, Selena was a Tejano star whose concert attendance shattered records both abroad and at home while also gaining her certain type of love and adoration that can only be attributed to her fans.

Here’s a look at the best tributes to Selena’s legacy.

Country music star Kacey Musgraves paid homage to the late Tejano reina at Rodeo Houston where Selena gave her final performance.

@KaceyMusgraves / Twitter

The six-time Grammy Award winner’s reverent rendition of the beloved Selena song couldn’t have been performed on a more appropriate day. In keeping with Selena’s performance at the Houston Astrodome, which was song 24 years to the day, Musgraves entered the dome on a horse while wearing a white jumpsuit.

Musgraves’ decision to sing in Spanish lends a thread of unity to her audience.

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In recent years, Musgraves has proved herself to be a far cry from the traditional image of a country music star. Country music has long been part of a history of anti-gay, racist, and conservative sentiment. The imageries most associated with the genre, ones related to empty bottles of whiskey, pick up trucks and blondes in cowboy beats aren’t ones that many liberals of colors are either eager to hitch their wagons to.

It’s why, when the LGBTQ+ affirming singer sang to a crowd of country music lovers in Spanish so many outside of the country music community felt particularly touched and optimistic.

Fans of Selena have been quick to comment on posts about the country singer’s cover with one fan writing “Kacey musgraves Spanish accent is pretty good and why? because she’s Different she’s that new type of country.”

Others were quick to share how immediate Kacey’s gesture to include Spanish speakers in her lineup affected her fans. “The crowd surrounding me were chatting and I heard comments such as, “Who is this?” and “Is she speaking Spanish?” They were younger non-kids of color so she may have unknowingly introduced Selena to a new crowd!” another Twitter user wrote.

Cardi B Paid Also Tribute to Selena Before Her Record-Breaking Performance at the Houston Rodeo

Cardi B has always repped her Latinx heritage loudly and proudly, including supporting and collaborating with fellow Latinx artists like Bad Bunny and Bruno Mars. She took the Latinx love even further by taking to social media to pay tribute to the Queen of Tejano music herself: Selena Quintanilla.

As we previously reported, Cardi B was chosen to perform at the famous Houston Livestock and Rodeo Show–otherwise known as the biggest rodeo in the world. In line with her heretofore history-making career, Cardi B broke further boundaries by smashing the rodeo’s previous attendance record and playing to a massive audience of 75,580 people.

Before hitting the stage, Cardi took to social media to share with fans how nervous she was to perform in front of such a large audience.

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EVERYTHING BIGGER IN TEXAS !!!!!

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Wearing a very fitting sparkly pink cowgirl outfit, Cardi stood in front of a picture of Selena, also dressed in a western-style outfit, and addressed her 41 millions followers.

“I was so nervous to perform in front of 70,000-plus people, but when I saw this picture,” Cardi said, pointing to the photo of Selena wearing her signature bustier and an off-the-shoulder leather jacket, “…I knew I was gonna be alright.”

According to Cardi, the outfit Selena was wearing in the photo was the style inspiration for her recent “Please Me” music video.

In her “Please Me” music video, Cardi B wears a very similar purple bedazzled Western-style leather jacket and matching bustier along with corn-rowed hair stacked with gold beads, effectively repping both sides of her Afro-Latina heritage.

Cardi continued to stan for Selena by singing along with a recording of “Como La Flor” that was playing in the background, including turning and serenading the picture of Selena on the wall.

Twenty-four years after her death, Traveling Selena made sure the singer’s influence is still being felt across the world.

Today, nearly 30 years after her death, the American singer’s legacy has continued its stretch across the globe, partially in thanks to a devoted Instagram profile called Traveling Selena which features the late singer in Barbie doll form at some of the most recognizable sights around the world.

In the style of a traveling gnome, the Instagram account is taking n the Tejano singer to some of the most recognizable sights in the world. Even more exciting the page’s creator features Selena wearing some of her more memorable outfits. The page’s account describes itself as taking pics in front of some of the most beautiful places! Outfits and pics are all my own.”

So far Selena has gone to the Grand Palace in Bangkok.

During her career, Selena expanded her fan following by touring New York City, Argentina, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Central America. At the time of her death, despite her broad international fan base which included countries such as Japan and Australia, she had not traveled much outside of the Americas. Now ya girl is getting to do the Bidi Bidi Bom Bom wherever the account goes. Including.

To Phuket.

Where even ancient dragons aren’t as fire as her replicated outfits.

They’ve even taken her to San Fran…

Where Selena’s most basic fan base will adore the Instagrammable pics taken by the bridge and the house from “Full House.”

And to see one of the world’s most iconic figures of all: Selena herself in wax form.

How meta.

And to San Diego

I love that they have Selena being a true millenial taking pciks in front of mural art.

As well as the zoo

And heading off to bless the animals at the zoo with her presence.

Even to her own mural

The best part of these pics is that we now get to add locations to our bucket list.

And Khao San Road

Literall watching Selena head off to all of these places is giving me so much wanderlust.

The Phi Phi Islands

Her trip to Thailand looks like the best ever and now I want to go take a vacay at a tropical get away.

On a Tuk Tuk

This is the best look above all and now I want to hop on a tuk tuk and take a ride!

All of the way to Sunset Station

Nothing more divine than Selena in her Dreaming of You outfit.

Aruba

Selena visiting the Caribbean?! Hope the account takes her back to Puerto Rico.

And Multnoham Falls

Selena literally living our best lives beyond the grave is everything.

And of course Avatar Land!

James Cameron would be so lucky to include the Latina icon in his wonderfully made up land.

BB even got to Palace of Fine Arts

Selena being her most real Barbie self outside of the palace of fine arts is everything .

And to the Cola factory!

And look at her chilling next to her favorite beverage of choice.

Girl got herself to Vegas!

Seeing the diva showing off a totally classic outfit on the strip will give you major going out vibes. Bidi bidi bom bom.

And The Full House house

Selena rocking her fullest self at the Full House house will give you all kinds of nostalgia for forever.

Of course Her favorite place in all of the land!

Selena went to visit her favorite state in the country: Texas for Halloween and got dressed up as the true reina that she is.

And last but not least the gum wall

Wearing one of her iconic outfits, Selena suited up to go to the gum wall.

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Remembering Latina Civil Rights Leaders On César Chávez Day

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Remembering Latina Civil Rights Leaders On César Chávez Day

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American labor leader and civil rights activist César Chávezhas become a major historical icon for the Latino community. Streets, parks, and schools have been named after him, a film about his life garnered international acclaim and every year on March 31, millions across the country celebrate César Chávez Day.

While Chávez did so much to secure right for our community, it’s important to remember hat Latina activists also had a huge hand in changing the course of our history.

Here’s a look at seven of some of history’s most powerful Latina activists who led marches and fought for your civil rights.

Sylvia Mendez

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When it comes to the desegregation of schools in the country, American history often credits the case of Brown v. Board of Education for the changes. Barbara Rose Johns is also the one who is most typically considered to be the face of that movement after she led a 450-student walkout at a high school in Virginia in 1951. But history has largely written out the work of Sylvia Mendez an American civil rights activists of Mexican and Puerto Rican descent who played a key role in the integration movement back in 1946. Mendez v. Westminster was a case sparked by Mendez’s rejection from an all-white school in California back in 1943 when she was just eight years old. Mendez’s parents sued the school district and the landmark case which was ultimately settled in 1947 successfully desegregated public schools in California making it the first U.S. state to do so.

Dolores Huerta

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As a fierce civil rights activist and labor leader, Dolores Huerta became a tireless advocate of the United Farm Workers union. The American-born Latina of Mexican descent originally started out her career as an elementary school teacher. After seeing kids in her class come to school hungry and in need of new shoes, she decided she would help organize their parents. She started to fight for economic improvements for Latino farm workers and pressed local government organizations to improve barrio conditions. In 1962, she co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (now known as the United Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee) with César Chávez. Her non-violent strikes and protests led to her 22 arrests. In 1997 she was named one of the three most important women of the year in by Ms. magazine.

Carmen Perez

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In 2017, Perez helped lead the country in its largest protest in U.S. history as a co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington. In her 20 year career as an activist, Perez has dedicated her advocacy to some of today’s most important civil rights issues including violence against women, mass incarceration, gender inequality and community policing. Before the Women’s March she helped launch a 9-day 250-mile march from New York City to Washington, DC called March2Justice which implored congressional lawmakers to turn their attention to the nation’s police justice crisis.

Berta Cáceres

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Best known for leading a campaign that opposed a dam on the Gualcarque River, Cáceres was an award-winning Indigenous environmental activist. In 2015, the Honduran environmentalist received the Goldman Environmental Prize for helming the grassroots effort that pushed the world’s largest dam builder to stop the construction of the Agua Zarca Dam at the Río Gualcarque. Because of her efforts the river that was saved and considered to be sacred by the Lenca people, was still able to provide the nearby tribe access to water, food, and medicine. On March 3, 2016, Berta Cáceres was assassinated for her activism when two assailants broke into her home and shot her. Her murder sparked international outrage and brought attention to the fact that Honduras is the most dangerous country in the world for activists who fight to protect forests and rivers.

The Mirabal Sisters

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Patria, Dedé, Minerva, and María Teresa Mirabal were four sisters from the Dominican Republic who ferociously opposed the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo and became known as Las Mariposas. In 1959, after witnessing a = massacre executed by the Trujillo regime the sisters were sparked into activism and rallied communities into public protests that renounced Trujillo’s rule. Three of the sisters, Minerva, María Teresa, and Patria, were murdered for their advocacy when they were beaten to death by associates of the government. Following the death of Las Mariposas, Dominicans across the island decided they had had enough. Six months later, Trujillo’s dictatorship was brought down when he was assassinated.

Sylvia Rivera 

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Well before activists like Harvey Milk and figures like Caitlyn Jenner made waves, there was Sylvia Rivera. The Latina born and raised in New York City had Puerto Rican and Venezuelan roots and a tragic story when she first began to carve out a place for trans people in the American gay liberation movement. Rivera was a self-identified drag queen and transwoman who participated in the Stonewall riots of 1969 and soon after founded Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with Marsha P. Johnson. In 1970 she led trans activists in the country’s first Gay Pride march, then known as Christopher Street Liberation Day March and in the years after she delivered fervent speeches that called for the support of LGBTQ people of color and who were homeless.