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We Scavenged Instagram For The Cutest DIY Halloween Costumes For Your Little Concha

When it comes to getting dressed, we all know that Latinos do it best. When it comes to Halloween this truth gets even scarier. Still, there’s no denying our desire to keep our little ones sweet and savory. This year for the coming Halloween season we’ve come to deliver, yet another, bomb list of costume ideas for you to wear for your nights of spook with your babies. 

From the sweetest looking concha costumes to the greenest avocados, here’s a list of all of the costume ideas to get crafty with before October 31st!

Your elote dreamboy.

ozzieitguy / Instagram

Everyone loves the local elote man and if there’s one costume you’ll have fun with / be praised with for being creative it’s this costume.What you need: For this, you’ll want to get your little one a crate and whole bunch of snacks you’d find on your elote man’s pushcart! Be sure to pair with a nicely sized hat and be sure to remind your little guy to smile, smile smile. After all, it’s the smile that keeps everyone coming back. Bonus points: have your kid pass out actual elotes!

The snuggliest avocado you will ever want to eat.

thisisohs/ Instagram

Whether you’re a millennial or just an Abuela’s girl who loves her some aguacate, you’ll love this Halloween favorite for your newborn.

What you need: No big sewing tools necessary! For this costume reach into your closet for your oldest green sweater or head down to Goodwill or Target. If your baby is small enough just cut off the hood, bundle your infant up and pull those strings nice and snug tight!

Avocado you forever baby.

whatwouldkrisdo / Instagram

Never fear! We’ve also got a perfect avocado costume for the chica whose baby has outgrown the hoodie trick! What you need: For this crafty costume be prepared to break out the real DIY craft. You’ll need paint, scissors, a thick string material (we recommend yarn!) and whatever kind of firm and longlasting paper material you can get your hands on! Cut out an avocado shape and then use a boxcutter to carve out a nice sized hole for baby’s belly. Paint up the rest! 

Sweetcheeks concha costume! 

imagineartears/ Instagram

Get those sweet checks the love and costume they deserve this year. To do the sweetness of your baby justice, dress her up in your favorite color elote. Pro tip: this costume is PERFECT for twins!

What you need: A cream-colored pajama set for your little one,  colorful construction paper, scissors, tape or glue and a concha to model.

Start your kids early on their Selena love!

valerie_thedancingbarbie / Instagram

What you need: For a scrappy version of this iconic Selena look, you’ll want to go for a purple sequin fabric to crisscross the top. Go for purple bottoms and either give your little one big hair OR part it down the middle and slick it back! DO pair this outfit with a pair of cowboy boots and size appropriate hoops if you have them on hand.

The young Frida Kahlo

sara_larriva / Instagram

You’ve got a burgeoning feminist on your hands and what better way to teach them about smashing glass ceilings then dressing them up as the icon of all eras?

What you need: Flowers, headband, hot glue, brow pencil.

A costume fit for a songstress queen for your little afro-latina reina.

glamnellie / Instagram

Use Halloween as a lesson on Afro-Latinidad and the musical icon of all time, by dressing up your baby as the ultimate songstress.

What you need: colorful hair wrap, colorful baby wig, (the smarts not to do blackface)

The cotton candy baby of your dreams.

sweetaholicx / Instagram

Sometimes you find this one on the elote cart, sometimes you don’t but this costume will no doubt, make your friends say “awww!” For the DIY Mom take caution: this costume will almost certainly get your sweet tooth going.

What you need: Whitetop, Pink pom-poms, tape.

A Coquí for your Boribaby.

aileen2035 / Follow

No way better to show your love for the Boris in your life right now than to dress up as their ultimate fave character. Teach your baby Bori about PR pride by suiting them as coqui this Halloween.

What you need: Green pajama pants and top. Green gloves, white, green and felt to cut out for eyes, hot glue

The sweetest little calabaza you’ve ever seen.

gree3d_/ Instagram

Every year they try to tell us that a Halloween pumpkin makes for a trite costume, but we say the calabaza suite is PRICELESS. For your little baby who will stand the test of time when it comes to the love in your heart, 100% go for this costume that will certainly have you upping your DIY game.

What you need: orange uni, black, and green felt, scissors, glitter ribbon, hot glue

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

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This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

fridakahlo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo’s Death Has Long Been The Subject Of Debate —This Play Unpacks The Painter’s Last Week Of Life 

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

This Play Explores The Last Week Of Frida Kahlo’s Life —And The Mystery Will Have You On The Edge Of Your Seat

There have been many movies, television dramas and stage productions based on the life and works of Mexico’s most famous artist Frida Kahlo, but none of these stories had ever explored the woman’s last week of life. As it turns out, her death has been an open-ended and unanswered question mark. Many believe there was a cover up, and this play dives deep into the mystery. 

The award-winning playwright and actress, Odalys Nanin explores the mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of Frida Kahlo’s life in her latest play.

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$25 Early bird tix at machatheatre.org

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‘Frida: Stroke of Passion’ peels away the secret cover up of the painter’s death and reveals what or who killed Frida Kahlo.

Until recently, Nanin, managed and produced at the MACHA Theatre in West Hollywood, CA, a company she founded years ago.

After writing and producing nearly a dozen plays, Nanin presented her last production at the MACHA last fall. The play was another original she wrote, this time about Mexico’s most controversial artist, and one of the world’s most famous painters, Frida Kahlo. 

Frida: Stroke of Passion, enjoyed a three-month long run last fall and received rave reviews and awards.

Frida Kahlo died July 13, 1954. Her death certificate alleges cause of death: “pulmunary embolism” but no autopsy was allowed and she was immediately cremated. The play explores her mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of her life – exposing her love affair with famous Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Maria Felix, Josephine Baker, Tina Moddoti, Leon Trotsky, a Cuban spy and her complex passionate love for Diego. 

Back by popular demand and with a grant from LA County Arts, DAC and CAC, “Frida: Strokes of Passion” premieres February 7 in Boyle Heights for six shows.

https://twitter.com/wehocity/status/913886405264330753?s=21

In Nanin’s tale, Kahlo’s bout with bronchopneumonia and the loss of her right leg left her frail and numb, “Her right leg had been amputated from the knee down so she is either in her wheel chair or bed ridden.  She was under a lot of pain killers and alcohol in order to numb her pain. So she was between a daze of sleep and awakening.”

“Espero que la salida sea gozosa, y espero nunca mas volver.”

https://twitter.com/laravalverde_99/status/1027297278032334848?s=21

In a diary entry written just days before her death, she wrote, “I hope the exit is joyful — and I hope never to return.” For these reasons, Nanin believes the artist took her own life.

In the play, Nanin delves deeper into Frida’s sexuality.

https://twitter.com/womensart1/status/1147401383706017792?s=21

“What initiated the spark of passion in me to write about Frida Kahlo was because as a lesbian Latinx I relate to her courage and fearless determination to stand up to injustice and to be the voice of the voiceless through her art and political activities.” 

The main players in the story are Kahlo’s tormented husband, Diego Rivera, the love of her life, but there were other lovers.

https://twitter.com/miss_rosen/status/1218909891991044096?s=21

Her passion didn’t just start or end with Rivera, there were several women in-between and one other man who also captured her heart, and during her final days, they all came visiting– taunting and haunting her with the memories they each represented. Women like Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Mexican movie star Maria Felix, cabaret singer and dancer Josephine Baker, famous model and photographer Tina Modotti, and Cuban revolutionist/spy Teresa Provenza. There was also the ghost of Leon Trotsky, a man she admired and loved and whose murder haunted Kahlo for the rest of her days.

The production has also been released in the form of a book. 

Nanin has written a book capturing her play in print– the story goes far beyond Kahlo’s Mexican and European Surrealism, and her indigenous Mexican culture influence. Frida Kahlo hated societal rules and traditions at every level, and she felt shackled as a woman. In the book, Nanin explores her frustrations, her love affairs, her queerness and overall, her passion for art. 

“Frida – A Stroke of Passion” runs February 7–9 and 14–16 at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and at 2 p.m. on Sundays at the Casa 0101 Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets and more information, click here.

Here Are Some Latinos You Might Not Have Known Have Jewish Heritage

Culture

Here Are Some Latinos You Might Not Have Known Have Jewish Heritage

@HarvardLibrary / @peasantmurphy / Twitter

The Spanish Inquisition and imperialism may have catalyzed a Roman-Catholic dominant Latino community, but it’s wrong to assume we’re all Catholic (or recovering Catholics). Just as Latinos can be every shade of skin color, we can also be practitioners of every major religion. While the number of Latino Jews living in the United States is minuscule, there are thriving Jewish communities living throughout Latin America, with as many as 300,000 Latino Jews living in Argentina alone. It’s important to underscore that the majority of Latino Jews’ ancestors immigrated to Latin America to escape religious persecution and rising anti-Semitism in Europe during the Holocaust. Of course, if you go back far enough, you’ll find that the first Spanish-speaking Jews to immigrate to Latin America did so during the Spanish Inquisition when they were either forced to convert to Catholicism or be expatriated. Many traveled to Italy where they were able to arrive by boat to “The New World.” 

Immigration, courage, and identity in the diaspora is a part of Latino Jewish stories, which is why we feel it’s so important to honor those stories. Next time someone makes an assumption about Latino identity, rattle off this list of proud Latino Jews who made their mark on the world.

1. Frida Kahlo

CREDIT: @HARVARDLIBRARY / TWITTER

That’s right! Frida Kahlo is beloved in both Latino communities and Jewish communities because Kahlo advocated for her full identity, even when it was dangerous to do so. Kahlo may have been just 47 years old when she died, but she spent the last couple of decades of her life shouting from rooftops her pride in her Jewish ancestry. She did so during an unspeakable time when 6 million European Jews were mass murdered. Kahlo has claimed that her father, Guillermo Kahlo, was a Hungarian Jew who immigrated to Mexico in 1891 but letters from her father himself claim that he comes from a long line of Lutherans. Historians are torn over the truth of the statement given that the stain of Nazi Germany caused so many fear-based lies about family origins.

2. Joaquin Phoenix

CREDIT: @ACTUALLY_INSANE / TWITTER

While we typically associate Joaquin Phoenix’s religion with the religious cult he was raised in, his mother is actually Jewish. Phoenix was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico to a mother of Russian and Hungarian Jewish descent. When his mother, Arlyn, moved to California and met Phoenix’s father (while hitchhiking), the two would later marry and join religious cult Children of God. Phoenix spent the early years of his childhood traveling around South America with their cult until they left Venezuela for the U.S. mainland when Phoenix was 4 years old. “My parents believed in God. I’m Jewish, my mom’s Jewish, but she believes in Jesus, she felt a connection to that. But they were never religious. I don’t remember going to church, maybe a couple of times,” Phoenix said during an interview with Buzz.ie on his role as Jesus in “Mary Magdalene” (2018).

3. Monica Lewinsky

CREDIT: @PEASANTMURPHY / TWITTER

Monica Lewinsky is best known as the young intern that President Bill Clinton sexually pursued while he was in office, she’s gone on to use her experience as a nationwide cyberbullying survivor to advocate against cyberbullying. Once you look more closely into her ancestral history, it’s easy to see how surviving persecution is ingrained in Lewinsky. Her father, Bernard Lewinsky, was born in El Salvador after his parents escaped Nazi-Germany. When he was 14 years old, the Lewinsky family moved to the United States. 

4. Bruno Mars

CREDIT: @BRUNOMARS / INSTAGRAM

While Bruno Mars has referred to his identity as a “gray zone” of ethnicity, the Hawaiin born singer is Latino, Jewish, Filipino and Hawaiian. His father is Puerto Rican and Ashkenazi Jewish and his mother is Filipino. 

5. Sammy Davis Jr. 

CREDIT: @WORLDVIEW_TODAY / TWITTER

The infamous singer, comedian and television personality Sammy Davis Jr. found the Jewish faith later in life. He was born in 1925 in Harlem to Elvera Sanchez, a Cuban-American tap dancer and stage performer. Davis had a near-death experience during a terrible car crash in San Bernadino, California. His friend and fellow comedian Eddie Cantor had given Davis a mezuzah the year prior. Davis wore it around his neck every day for good luck and says the only day he forgot to wear it was the night of the accident. In the hospital, Cantor and Davis had a lively discussion about the similarities between Jewish and Black cultures. Years later, he converted to Judaism and practiced its faith until his death.

READ: Disney Is Debuting Their First Jewish Princess And Surprise! She’s Also Latina