Fierce

We Scavenged Instagram For The Cutest DIY Halloween Costumes For Your Little Concha

When it comes to getting dressed, we all know that Latinos do it best. When it comes to Halloween this truth gets even scarier. Still, there’s no denying our desire to keep our little ones sweet and savory. This year for the coming Halloween season we’ve come to deliver, yet another, bomb list of costume ideas for you to wear for your nights of spook with your babies. 

From the sweetest looking concha costumes to the greenest avocados, here’s a list of all of the costume ideas to get crafty with before October 31st!

Your elote dreamboy.

ozzieitguy / Instagram

Everyone loves the local elote man and if there’s one costume you’ll have fun with / be praised with for being creative it’s this costume.What you need: For this, you’ll want to get your little one a crate and whole bunch of snacks you’d find on your elote man’s pushcart! Be sure to pair with a nicely sized hat and be sure to remind your little guy to smile, smile smile. After all, it’s the smile that keeps everyone coming back. Bonus points: have your kid pass out actual elotes!

The snuggliest avocado you will ever want to eat.

thisisohs/ Instagram

Whether you’re a millennial or just an Abuela’s girl who loves her some aguacate, you’ll love this Halloween favorite for your newborn.

What you need: No big sewing tools necessary! For this costume reach into your closet for your oldest green sweater or head down to Goodwill or Target. If your baby is small enough just cut off the hood, bundle your infant up and pull those strings nice and snug tight!

Avocado you forever baby.

whatwouldkrisdo / Instagram

Never fear! We’ve also got a perfect avocado costume for the chica whose baby has outgrown the hoodie trick! What you need: For this crafty costume be prepared to break out the real DIY craft. You’ll need paint, scissors, a thick string material (we recommend yarn!) and whatever kind of firm and longlasting paper material you can get your hands on! Cut out an avocado shape and then use a boxcutter to carve out a nice sized hole for baby’s belly. Paint up the rest! 

Sweetcheeks concha costume! 

imagineartears/ Instagram

Get those sweet checks the love and costume they deserve this year. To do the sweetness of your baby justice, dress her up in your favorite color elote. Pro tip: this costume is PERFECT for twins!

What you need: A cream-colored pajama set for your little one,  colorful construction paper, scissors, tape or glue and a concha to model.

Start your kids early on their Selena love!

valerie_thedancingbarbie / Instagram

What you need: For a scrappy version of this iconic Selena look, you’ll want to go for a purple sequin fabric to crisscross the top. Go for purple bottoms and either give your little one big hair OR part it down the middle and slick it back! DO pair this outfit with a pair of cowboy boots and size appropriate hoops if you have them on hand.

The young Frida Kahlo

sara_larriva / Instagram

You’ve got a burgeoning feminist on your hands and what better way to teach them about smashing glass ceilings then dressing them up as the icon of all eras?

What you need: Flowers, headband, hot glue, brow pencil.

A costume fit for a songstress queen for your little afro-latina reina.

glamnellie / Instagram

Use Halloween as a lesson on Afro-Latinidad and the musical icon of all time, by dressing up your baby as the ultimate songstress.

What you need: colorful hair wrap, colorful baby wig, (the smarts not to do blackface)

The cotton candy baby of your dreams.

sweetaholicx / Instagram

Sometimes you find this one on the elote cart, sometimes you don’t but this costume will no doubt, make your friends say “awww!” For the DIY Mom take caution: this costume will almost certainly get your sweet tooth going.

What you need: Whitetop, Pink pom-poms, tape.

A Coquí for your Boribaby.

aileen2035 / Follow

No way better to show your love for the Boris in your life right now than to dress up as their ultimate fave character. Teach your baby Bori about PR pride by suiting them as coqui this Halloween.

What you need: Green pajama pants and top. Green gloves, white, green and felt to cut out for eyes, hot glue

The sweetest little calabaza you’ve ever seen.

gree3d_/ Instagram

Every year they try to tell us that a Halloween pumpkin makes for a trite costume, but we say the calabaza suite is PRICELESS. For your little baby who will stand the test of time when it comes to the love in your heart, 100% go for this costume that will certainly have you upping your DIY game.

What you need: orange uni, black, and green felt, scissors, glitter ribbon, hot glue

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Culture

If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Bettman Archives / Getty Images

So many of us have been moved the art of the late Frida Kahlo. Even in death she’s gone on to inspire entire generations with her Surrealist self-portraits, lush depictions of plant and animal life, and magical realist tableaux. Not to mention her incredible life story.

She also inspired future generations of artists, many of whom are alive today creating beautiful works of art. These are just a few of the artists who have similar techniques, subjects, and styles to Frida Kahlo that you’ll definitely love if you’re a fan of Frida Kahlo.

Maria Fragoso – Mexico City

Credit: Teach Me Sweet Things / Theirry Goldberg Gallery

Influenced by the style and narratives of Mexican surrealists and muralists, Maria Fragoso creates work that celebrates her Mexican culture, while also addressing notions of gender expression and queer identity. Her brightly colored canvases offer voyeuristic glimpses into intimate moments, with subjects engaging in acts that seem at once seductive and mischievous—often while gazing directly out at the viewer.

Recently featured in Forbes’s “30 Under 30” in the “Art and Style” category, the 25-year-old artist is quickly rising to prominence. Born and raised in Mexico City, Fragoso moved to Baltimore in 2015 to pursue her BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art. While in school, Fragoso was the recipient of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Fellowship at the Yale Norfolk School of Art. Since graduating, she has completed residencies at Palazzo Monti and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

Nadia Waheed – Austin, Texas

Credit: Message from Janus / Mindy Solomon Gallery

Born in Saudi Arabia to Pakistani parents, Austin, Texas–based artist Nadia Waheed explores notions of relocation, displacement, and vulnerability in her work. Her life-size figurative paintings are both allegorical and autobiographical—the female figures represent her own lived experiences, as well as the multifaceted identities of all women.

Rodeo Tapaya – Philippines

Credit: Nowhere Man / A3 Art Agency

Rodel Tapaya paints dreamlike, narrative works based on myths and folklore from his native Philippines. Drawing parallels between age-old fables and current events, Tapaya reimagines mythical tales by incorporating fragments of the present. “In some way, I realize that old stories are not just metaphors. I can find connections with contemporary time,” Tapaya said in a 2017 interview with the National Gallery of Australia. “It’s like the myths are poetic narrations of the present.”

While the content of Tapaya’s work is inspired by Filipino culture, his style and literary-based practice is heavily influenced by Mexican muralists and Surrealist painters such as José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and, of course, Frida Kahlo. Often working at a large scale, Tapaya has been commissioned to create several site-specific murals, including one for Art Fair Philippines in February 2020.

Leonor Fini – Buenos Aires

Credit: Les Aveugles / Weinstein Gallery

Long overlooked in favor of male Surrealists, Leonor Fini, a contemporary of Kahlo, was a pioneering 20th-century force. Known for having lived boldly, Fini is recognized for her unconventional lifestyle, theatrical personality, and avant-garde fashion sense. Born in Buenos Aires in 1907, Fini was raised by her mother in Trieste, Italy. She taught herself to paint and first exhibited her work at the age of 17.

Fini had one of her first solo exhibitions at age 25 with a Parisian gallery directed by Christian Dior. Her work was then included in the groundbreaking exhibition “Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism” at MoMA in 1936, while at the same time she had her first New York exhibition with Julien Levy Gallery. Today, Fini’s work is represented in many major public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Tate Modern in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice.

Ramon Alejandro – Miami

Credit: Eternal Life / Latino Art Core

José Ramón Díaz Alejandro, better known as Ramon Alejandro, paints idyllic still lifes of tropical fruits set in ethereal landscapes. The surrealistic compositions have a similar spirit to Kahlo’s less iconic but equally masterful still-life works

Coming from a long lineage of artists, Alejandro grew up with the artworks of his great-grandfather, grandfather, and uncle adorning the walls of his childhood home. After growing up in Havana, Alejandro was sent to live in Argentina in 1960 amidst political turmoil in Cuba, and has continued to live in exile since then.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Romance Between Frida Kahlo And Chavela Vargas Gets Renewed Attention As Long Lost Love Letters Are Uncovered

Entertainment

The Romance Between Frida Kahlo And Chavela Vargas Gets Renewed Attention As Long Lost Love Letters Are Uncovered

Jorge Silva / Getty Images

Frida Kahlo’s paintings perfectly show the artist’s whirlwind of emotions throughout her life. Her art gives a look into her passions, her pains and her loves, which went far beyond Diego Rivera. 

It’s long been known that the prolific artist had many loves throughout her life, both men and women, and including many major personalities of their time. Everyone from Tina Modotti and the politician León Trotsky were on that list in addition to her longtime companion, Diego Rivera. However, one of Kahlo’s great loves and of whom little is said was the singer Chavela Vargas.

Chavela, who was 12 years younger than Frida, spoke on several occasions about the love she had for Kahlo when her musical career began to take off, while she was “a child.” And thanks to recently discovered love letters we have a new perspective on this little known relationship.

New love letters give us details into the romance between Frida Kahlo and Chavela Vargas.

Although Chavela had claimed to have destroyed all of the love letters she received from Frida Kahlo, new love letters have recently been discovered that paint a new light on the romance.

There is one letter Kahlo had written to Carlos Pellicer, a Mexican poet, to express her feelings about the singer. She told him that after meeting Chavela she felt attracted to her from the very first moment – in some pretty steamy language.

“Today I met Chavela Vargas. Extraordinary, lesbian, what’s more, I wanted her erotically. I don’t know if she felt what I did. But I think she’s a liberal enough woman, that if she asks me, I wouldn’t hesitate for a second to undress in front of her. How many times do you not want to get laid and that’s it? She, I repeat, is erotic. Is it a gift that heaven sends me?”, wrote Kahlo.

It was shortly after Kahlo wrote that letter that Chavela went to live with her and Diego at La Casa Azul. In another recently discovered letter, Vargas writes – of her time at Casa Azul – that she felt very happy and in love, as well as loved by Kahlo.

“She taught me a lot of things and I learned a so much. Without giving away too much, I held the sky with my hands, with every word, every morning,” she said.

The lovers had an intense relationship that has fascinated fans to this day.

The two had met at one of the many parties Kahlo and Rivera would host at their home in Casa Azul. The couple were prolific entertainers and often threw extravagant parties.

Before her death, Vargas detailed that night’s meeting.

“A painter friend invited me. She said: ‘There’s a party at Frida’s house tonight. Shall we go?’ I went and the atmosphere was full of people. The night passed, we sang, everyone danced, everyone entertained,” Vargas says in the documentary Chavela, released in 2017.

“I was in a daze when I saw her face, her eyes. I thought she couldn’t be a being from this world. Her eyebrows together were a swallow in flight. Without yet having the maturity of a woman in me, since I was a very young girl, I sensed that I could love that being with the most devoted love in the world, the strongest love in the world,” said the singer about Frida.

Although the romance didn’t last long thanks in part to the painter’s relationship with Diego Rivera.

Credit: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Vargas confessed that the romance didn’t last for a long time on the account of having to share the painter’s love with Diego Rivera. According to Vargas, one day Kahlo simply decided to abandon her.

“My words possibly hurt her a lot when I told her I was leaving and she told me: ‘I know. It is impossible to tie you to anybody’s life. I can’t tie you to my crutches or to my bed. Go away!’ And one day I opened the door and didn’t come back,” Vargas said.

Although the singer never spoke about whether she had intimate relationships with the painter, the romance, as well as the great love and attraction they felt for each other is something that cannot be denied.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com