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TECHNOLOchicas Is Empowering Latinas To Chase Their Technology Driven Dreams

These chicas love technology and they want to encourage other women to follow their same passion.

TECHNOLOchicas is all about sharing stories of Latinas dominating the tech world. The program, created in conjunction with National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) and Televisa Foundation, wants to give Latinas the resources and connections to make their dreams come true. According to the website and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Latinas are the fastest growing demographic of women and IT is the fastest growing segment of the economy. By 2050, it is estimated that Latinas will make up 26 percent of women in the U.S. TECHNOLOchicas is aiming to raise awareness for young Latinas to know about their opportunities in the world of information and technology and even Eva Longoria has endorsed the organization and their mission.

“I’m a woman in technology but I also know that I bring different things to the table,” Natalie Rodriguez says in the trailer for the program. “I bring a different perspective.”

Find out more about TECHNOLOchicas by clicking here.


READ: Here Are Some Of The Most Chingona Signs Latinas Carried During The Women’s March

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People Came Together And Raised The Money To Help A Mexican Engineering Student Make It To NASA

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People Came Together And Raised The Money To Help A Mexican Engineering Student Make It To NASA

@dvillegass / Twitter

There are a few moments when our dreams are actualized. For Daniela Villegas, that time is now. The Mexican engineering student earned a spot in a NASA program with her brains. Then, the community came together and raised the money she needed to follow her dream.

Daniela Villegas is a Mexican engineering student chasing her dreams.

Villegas is one of 60 people in the world chosen to participate in the International Air and Space Program. The program is a major educational opportunity for students in engineering and aerospace studies. Now that she has been chosen, it is time for her to pay the money in order to attend.

An online community came together and raised the money she needed to get to the NASA program.

What a wonderful moment for the young woman, and Mexicans everywhere. After all, when one of us succeeds, we all succeed. We are all here rooting for you, Daniela. You can do it, mija!

Villegas is bringing so much pride to Mexico and Mexicans around the world.

Daniela Villegas is studying mechatronics engineering, which is a specialized engineering field. Mechatronic engineering is where mechanical, electrical, computer and robotics engineering come together. Mechatronic engineers are the ones who help to create all of the smart technologies that we use almost every day to make our lives easier.

The TecNM – Instituto Tecnológico de Hermosillo student needs our help and we can make her dream happen.

TecNM – Instituto Tecnológico de Hermosillo is located in the middle of the state of Sonora. Villegas raised $3,500 to get to the program in Huntsville, Alabama, and any little bit helped. It also wouldn’t be bad if she raised more so she can fully enjoy her time in the program making the most out of this once-in-a-lifetime experience.

READ: A Mexican Teenager Was The First Minor In 100 Years To Be Accepted Into A Post-Graduate Program At Harvard

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Julio Rivera Created The Meditation App Liberate To Help The Black Community Heal

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Julio Rivera Created The Meditation App Liberate To Help The Black Community Heal

Courtesy of Julio Rivera

Mental health is so important. There are so many ways to work on your mental health and meditation is one of them. Julio Rivera, an Afro-Latinx software engineer, was tired of the all-white meditation world he experienced and decided to do something about it. With the help of the Apple App Store’s big presence and marketing tools, Liberate has reached the audience who needs it most.

Julio Rivera is the creator of Liberate, a meditation app.

Rivera started his journey into meditation started five years ago. The practice helped him with managing his stress and anxiety in a natural and healthy way. Rivera had struggled with drugs and alcohol to cope but meditation became a different kind of escape and he wanted to get deeper into it.

“I downloaded an app called Headspace and that’s where my meditation journey began and I really started to notice changes in my stress and anxiety levels,” Rivera says. “From that, I realized, ‘Wow. This was really helping me.’”

Rivera got involved with meditation thanks to an app.

Rivera found Headspace, a meditation app to help him get familiar with meditation. After a while, Rivera wanted a more personal experience in meditation because the app wasn’t cutting it for him because of the overwhelmingly white presence. This was the time before Covid when meeting in person was a safe and acceptable thing to do.

“I started attending different in-person meditation communities in New York City and after trying out a few communities I landed in a community-specific for supporting people of color,” Rivera recalls. “I remember walking into the room and seeing all of these beautiful Black and brown faces, mostly and just feeling at home and at ease. Like I was back with family being a Black and Latinx man.”

Rivera further explains that meditating in predominantly white spaces hinders the healing power of meditation. The lack of Black and brown voices and faces in his previous meditation experiences left him unable to feel completely at ease.

Rivera’s experience in these spaces is why he created Liberate.

Liberate was born of a need to have spaces to talk about, tackle, and dismantle internalized racism that is forced on people. Rivera saw a need for a Black space in the meditation world to give Black people a chance to deal with this issue. Society’s racist ideals have been perpetuated to a point that people have internalized that notion.

“When I looked at apps at the time, nobody was really looking at the experience of some who identifies as Black, indigenous, or a person of color,” Rivera says. “That’s when I felt called to us my background in mobile apps startups. I was a software engineer for a very long time. I felt like this was a calling to be of service and to start Liberate.”

Rivera harnessed his software engineer experience and created a place for Black people to find peace. Liberate is a place for the Black community to work through the anti-Blackness that has been so prevalent in American society for centuries.

Rivera is grateful for Apple’s work in getting Liberate out there.

The Apple App Store has been a driving force in getting Liberate out there to the necessary community. Apple has joined other major companies in highlighting Black-owned and Black-created products. This goes for Liberate.

Liberate was included in a list of apps created by and for communities of color. The collection of apps called “Stand Up to Racism” highlights apps including Liberate, StoryCorps, and Black Nation. The intention is to give people a chance to discover and support Black-owned businesses and apps.

Apple offers a diverse array of apps to support people in various communities. Mental health is very important during Covid and apps like Liberate are paving the way for communities of color to openly discuss the importance of taking care of mental health.

READ: Here’s Why An Afro-Latino Decided To Make A New Meditation App Just For People Of Color

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