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Teachers and Principal of Predominately Black and Brown Students Bring Noose to School

Four teachers, and the principal, were seen holding a noose in a school office at Palmdale, California (outside of Los Angeles), after a photo of them circulated social media. The four teachers and the principal of Summerwind Elementary School were placed on leave but not fired.

Following the incident the Superintendent of Schools, Raul Maldonado issued a statement meant to reassure parents, “I am appalled that this incident occurred. “I am committed to the Palmdale Promise’s values of equity, integrity, and multiculturalism, and I know that most of the district believe[s] in the same values the Promise upholds.” However, parents remain concerned about these apparently racist acts and a lack of diversity and sensitivity in their district.

Parent Shaka Phillips, “The integrity of the school is completely compromised. To the black community, a noose is a weapon, a symbol of slavery and lynching.”

A school environment that somehow encourages, or normalizes joking about a noose by teachers, is especially concerning in a school where the student body of is 18% Black, 65% Latino, and 9% White. Summerwind, like most elementary schools in the US, is staffed mostly by white teachers and administrators.

This is true for elementary and high schools all over the United States. The National Center for Educational Statistics found during the 2014-2015 school year that the overwhelming majority of teachers teaching in Elementary and Secondary schools are white: 80%. Individual schools are not mandated to make public the diversity (lack of diversity) of their teachers. They are mandated to make public their student demographics and are even given high ratings for the diversity of their student body.

Meanwhile, data shows that increasing teacher diversity can improve student success and reduce dropout rates.

Schools may be slow to reform but parents at Summerwind wasted no time mobilizing a protest outside the school on May 9. They protested outside the school until the teachers in the photo were removed from classrooms. The principal in the photo, Linda Brandts, was herself, not on campus that day. The four teachers were, eventually, sent home per the demands of organized parents.

In various reports about the Palmdale school’s noose incident, community members are calling for a variety of reforms and citing incidences like this one as a reason why many are leaving the district. Some believe the incident has created an opportunity for teaching and learning, but many want racist teachers fired. “We drop our kids off with the idea that we are sending them to a culturally competent institution for learning. We think that we’re sending them to a school; they’re safe,” said Breyson Clemmons, “Never do we think we’re sending them to a plantation where they got nooses hanging up, and holding on to nooses. Taking pictures and smiling, where’s the humor?”

Others are in disbelief, Community activist Miguel Coronado, whose wife works for the District, said he couldn’t believe it when he saw the picture.

An unnamed teacher who works at the school reportedly said, before the incident, that the predominately white teachers are a problem.

Twitter user @davitydave expressed his outrage by pointing out there is no way in 2019 that educators can claim innocence. He calls their actions “racist AF.”

Telemundo52 News Reporter, Dinorah Perez, tweeted about the story by quoting a parent from Summerwind Elementary. The parent, like many others, expressed worry and fear about bringing her child to school.

@techSMIF, a former resident of Palmdale, where the incident took place, cites people like those trolling the comments about the incident as the reason he’d never move back to that city.

Based on reports by residents, and former residents, the city of Palmdale, or at least the schools, are inequitable places where the seats of power are reserved for the privileged few, and where some of those with power abuse it. Not unlike the Idaho teachers, who last Halloween, posed in photos wearing a Mexican border wall costume that said, “Make America Great Again.”

We send our kids here to school to get educated and we trust the teachers and want them to feel safe,” she said. “When you get a picture like that you don’t trust the school. You don’t want your kid coming back here. It shows what they think about us. Even if it was a joke and it wasn’t supposed to surface and it did, it backfired. You’re not supposed to be joking about stuff like that. Because still to this day it happens.”

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

Kevork Djansezian / Getty

Advocates against the use of standardized tests for college admissions have long argued that the use of such exams sets back students from underprivileged backgrounds and those who have disabilities. Aware of the leg up it gives to privileged and non-disabled students an advantage in the admittance process, they’ve rallied for schools to end such practices.

And it looks like they’ve just won their argument.

A judge has ruled that the University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as part of their admissions process.

Brad Seligman is the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday. The plaintiffs in Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California include five students and six organizations College Access Plan, Little Manila Rising, Dolores Huerta Foundation, College Seekers, Chinese for Affirmative Action, and Community Coalition.

In his decision, Judge Seligman underlined that the UC system’s “test-optional” policy on UC campuses has long given privileged and non-disabled students a chance at a “second look” in the admissions process. According to Seligman, this “second look” denies such opportunities to students who are unable to access the tests.

The decision is a major victory for students with disabilities and from underprivileged backgrounds.

News of the decision comes on the heels of the university system’s ruling to waive the standardized testing requirements until 2024.

In May, a news release asserted that if a new form of a standardized test had not been developed by 2025, the system would have to put an end to the testing requirement for California students. On Monday, the judge’s ruling took things further by banning the consideration of scores from students who submit them all together.

“The current COVID 19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test sites,” Seligman wrote in his ruling. “While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accommodations or even to locate suitable test locations for the test is ‘almost nil.'”

A spokesperson for the University of California said the university “respectfully disagrees with the Court’s ruling.”

“An injunction may interfere with the University’s efforts to implement an appropriate and comprehensive admissions policies and its ability to attract and enroll students of diverse backgrounds and experiences,” the spokesperson said. According to the spokesperson, the UC system is considering further legal action in the case. The system said that its testing has allowed for an increase in admission of low-income and first-generation-to-college-students for the fall of 2020.

With UC being the largest university system in the country, Seligman’s ruling is a massive deal. Students and advocates have long fought for the elimination of these standardized tests arguing that they do not accurately reflect a student’s academic ability.

“Research has repeatedly proved that students from wealthy families score higher on the SAT and ACT, compared to students from low-income families,” reports CNN. It’s important to note that the analysis by Inside Higher Ed revealed that the “lowest average scores for each part of the SAT came from students with less than $20,000 in family income. The highest scores came from those with more than $200,000 in family income.”

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This Mexican Teacher Drives Two Whole Hours Out Of Her Way To Teach Kids With Special Needs In The Pandemic

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This Mexican Teacher Drives Two Whole Hours Out Of Her Way To Teach Kids With Special Needs In The Pandemic

Fiona Goodall / Getty

It is a truth nationally acknowledged that teachers in the United States are massively undervalued.

As educators, the teachers in our country often act as keepers of our children, the leaders of their knowledge as well as the ones who help instill them with moral values. What’s more, their presence provides parents with much-needed support, particularly in cases where children might have special needs. During the time of the COVID crisis, its no wonder that the effort of a Mexican teacher to step up and be present for her students in a way that goes beyond the description of her job, is gaining exceptional praise.

A teacher based out of Mexico is being praised as an ‘angel’ for turning her pickup truck into a classroom on wheels.

An elementary school teacher in Apaseo el Alto, Guanajuato, is literally going the extra mile to help her autistic students during the pandemic.

The teacher, identified only as Nay, is ensuring that her students don’t fall behind despite the fact that their school has been closed. To reach her students she drives two hours every day to meet those who do not have access to books or the internet to make sure they receive proper help with schoolwork.

During their in-person class session, Nay meets with her students in the back of her pickup truck. The entire time Nay and her students both wear masks and use hand sanitizer.

The teacher’s efforts recently went viral after one of her student’s mothers shared a photo of her work on Twitter.

In the photo posted to the mother’s Twitter page, Nay can be sitting in the back of a red pickup trick working with a student while wearing a mask.

“In Mexico, school was cancelled because of the pandemic. This teacher turned her pickup truck into a portable classroom,” Akki wrote on her Twitter page. “She drives two hours a day to teach children with autism who don’t have books or access to the internet.”

The tweet about the teacher has earned thousands of likes and retweets.

According to an interview with Quien, Nay says all teachers put in this much of an effort to provide their students with support.

Nay told Quien that she usually works at a school with students who have disabilities and is always working to improve as a teacher. On the day that the photo was taken Nay said she was evaluating her students “to really know how this pandemic was affecting [the students’] learning since they are the most vulnerable.” She was also curious to “know how they feel … because this has not been easy for anyone.”

In response to the image, Twitter users are calling Nay a “hero.”

“Due to restricted/repetitive behaviors of kids in the spectrum isn’t easy to modify teaching conditions to them so what this teacher is doing is extremely valuable, pure Love,” one user wrote in the comments of the tweet. “Autism is a complex developmental condition that involves many challenges, learning is only one of them”

“God bless this woman,” another commenter wrote. “Shout out to all those who go the extra mile to help those in need. This is exactly what humanity is all about, something we should all learn from one another.'”

“Teachers DESERVE TO BE PAID WAY MORE THAN THEY ARE PAID,” another user pointed out. “They spend more time with other people’s children than the children spend with their own families.”

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