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From Swimwear To Summer Tanks, These Are The Brands Owned By Women Of Color To Buy For Your July Look

Birthdays are always an excuse to blow a little money and do some shopping. In our capitalist-based society, America’s birthday is no exception. However, if we’re going to dip into our bank accounts we can at least make sure to support Latinx and Black-owned businesses.

We’ve compiled a list of July buys you should shop to support these POC and Black entrepreneurship.

Let the shopping spree commence!

1. Chigona

Instagram / @soychigona

Established in 2013, Chigona is owned and operated by boss Latina entrepreneur, Julia Carrillo. Whether you need bags, jewelry, notebooks or sunglasses, this shop’s apparel is designed for chingonas of all walks of life. Chigona is celebrating America’s birthday and its owner’s birthday at the same time with a double discount of 20%. This will be applied automatically to your total purchase.

2. AC Cosmetics

Instagram / @accosmetics_

AC Cosmetics is a Black-owned beauty, cosmetics, and personal care business. It specializes in translucent powder but the company also sells lashes and hair care products. For the 4th of July, all cosmetics are 40% off with the promo code “FIREWORKS.”

3. Maldición

Instagram / @maldicionbrand

Focusing on the Xicanx and Mexican communities, Maldición explores the spaces where our Mexican and American identities meet. An apparel company that caters to both men and women Maldición’s colorful graphics make for substantially beautiful clothing. Starting today, the clothing brand will offer 15% total purchases through the 4th of July weekend. Just use promo code “CorazonDeLaGente” to redeem the deal.

4. Hey Mijita

Instagram / @heymijita

San Antonio-based Hey Mijita is a clothing and accessories shop with las mujeres in mind. A lifestyle brand that promotes Latina entrepreneurship, empowerment and self-worth, you’ll especially love Hey Mijitas fun tees and flirty skirts. On Thursday the 4th and Friday the 5th, the entire store will be 15% off.

5. Miradela

Instagram / @miradela

One part podcast and one part apparel shop, Miradela is a hip Houston-based, Latina owned brand. As if that wasn’t “fetch” enough, it’s also home of the “You’re Like Really Bonita” shirt. For America’s birthday, Miradela will have a 24-hour sale on all apparel. Use code “Sparkler” at checkout for your discount.

6. Cha Cha Covers

Instagram / @chachacovers

If you need your nails to be as on point as the rest of you, check out Cha Cha Covers’ 4th of July sale. Created by the crafty Ana Guajardo, these decals are both kind to your skin and really mesmerizing. For 25% off your purchase, use code “Stranger” from July 3rd through the 5th.

7. Glamlindo Artesania

Instagram / @glamlindo_artesania

Mixing artesania with modern fashion, Glamlindo Artesania embraces Mexico’s Indigenous communities. Founded by a Latina mother-daughter duo, Glamlindo partners with artisans to create unique items. On the 4th of July, the brand will offer 15% off your total purchase on their website.

8. Frida Inspired Shop

Instagram / @frida_inspired

Frida Kahlo is one of the most beloved Latina artists to ever live. Honoring the artist, the Frida Inspired Shop is filled with all things Kahlo. To get your hands on discounted artista jewelry or accessories, visit the Frida Inspired Shop on July 4th for 20% off your total purchase.

9. Mija Culture

Instagram / @mijaculture

The Texas-based Mija Culture is all about Emo Chola energy mixed with street wear. The Latina-owed shop offers hats, tees and accessories for both mijas AND mijos. Swing by their online shop on July 4th to get a 20% discount on your total purchase with promo code “Cuetes.”

10. Alni Body Care

Instagram / @alnicbd

CBD is beginning to find it’s way into more of our health and beauty products. It’s soothing power is awesome for aches and pains. That’s why Alni Body Care uses it in their homemade salves and oils. Through out the month of July, you can get free shipping on your order of CBD-infused body care items. Just use code “JulyFreeShip” at checkout.

11. Valfré

Instagram / @valfre

If you’re looking to add some hip new pieces to your summer wardrobe, Valfré is for you. Mexican artist Ilse Valfré founded the clothing, home goods, accessories and makeup brand. As such, you’ll find her creative cuties slapped on to most of her goods. From now until 11 PM on July 4th, you can get an additional 30% off of already on-sale items. CV

12. Viva La Bonita

@vivalabonita/Instagram

Viva La Bonita, the Latina lifestyle and apparel brand that is “inspired by the women who are fearless” has a delightful collection of one-piece swimsuits in any color that suits your fancy. Sizes run from XS to XXXL. Shop for your Bonita-wear here.

13. Night In Gail

Instagram / @nightingailcollection

Night In Gail wants you to take your self care to a whole new level. The California-based bath and body company was founded by a Black woman and uses CBD in their products for women, men and pets. Until July 8th, Night In Gail is offering 20% off of all orders. Use code “Summer” at check out.

14. Eye Candy Boutique

Instagram / @heyeyecandy

If you’re plus-sized, it can be especially hard to find awesome clothes that actually fit. Eye Candy Boutique have made it their mission to help ease this burden with their gorgeous clothing and shoes offerings. The Latina-owned boutique offers a live shop in San Antonio, Texas as well as an online store. Both will be open and offering a BOGO half-off promo until July 8th. Just apply code “BOGOFreedom” at check out.

15. Bruja Shop

Instagram / @OnceUponABruja

Something wicked this way comes. If you’re a little witchy and are looking for the perfect accessories to show it, check out the Bruja Shop. Specializing in Bruja-inspired jewelry, you can find rings, necklaces and other shiny things. The Bruja Shop will be offering 20% off your total July 4th order.

16. Vive Cosmetics

Instagram / @vivecosmetics

The fireworks won’t be the only things dazzling on July 4th. Latina-owned Vive Cosmetics wants to help you find the perfect shade from their cruelty-free and vegan product line. On July 4th and 5th, use code “HereToStay” for 20% off. Also. To celebrate the contribution of Latinx Immigrants, Vive Cosmetics will be donating an additional 20% from each sale to nonprofits helping with the border crisis.

17. Hija de tu Madre

Instagram / @hijadetumadre

If we’re going to acknowledge everything that makes the US great, we need to point out its atrocities as well. Lifestyle brand Hija De Tu Madre is doing just that with their new shirt. Dropping on July 4th at 8 am, their “Fuck Ice” shirt will be available for purchase. There’s no discount here but a portion of proceeds from this tee will go to Border Kindness.

18. Cholas x Chulas

Instagram / @cholaxchulas

Get your face glamorous just in time for the neighborhood 4th of July party with discounted goodies from Cholas x Chulas. The Latinx makeup brand features to-die-for eyeliner kits and fashion accents gems. Cholas x Chulas is going big for their 4th of July sale with 50% off of your total purchase. Use code “CXC50” at checkout to redeem.

Protests Against ICE Detention Centers Reached New Heights As Airplanes Typed Messages In The Sky Across The U.S.

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Protests Against ICE Detention Centers Reached New Heights As Airplanes Typed Messages In The Sky Across The U.S.

Dee Gonzalez / In Plain Sight

A global pandemic is still gripping the United States – along with much of the world. But still many Americans headed outside over the long holiday weekend and, before the evening fireworks, were greeted by powerful anti-ICE messages written in the skies.

The skywriting campaign comes as much of the world’s attention is focused on Covid-19 and organizers hope to redirect some attention on the thousands of migrants who remain locked up in detention centers across the country.

Activists took to the skies at more than 80 sites across the country with a powerful message against U.S. immigration policy.

Over the July 4th weekend, two fleets of skytyping airplanes created artist-generated messages across the U.S. The fleet of aircraft targeted 80 different ICE detention facilities, immigration court houses, processing centers, and former internment camps. Written with water vapor, the messages are designed to be seen and read for miles.

Each message ended with #XMAP, which, when plugged into social media, directs users to an online interactive map that offers a view of the closest ICE facilities to the user.

Visitors to the event’s website are encouraged to donate to local funds like the Black Immigrant Bail Fund and join the #FreeThemAll campaign, which advocates for the release of detainees from crowded facilities, where social distancing is often impossible right now.

The ambitious project took a year to plan, and is one component of an artist-led protest against immigrant detention and America’s mass incarceration problem. With “In Plain Sight,” organizers are hoping to educate viewers—and to encourage the abolition of facilities such as these.

“I think the public is somewhat aware of what’s happening in detention centers—they’ve seen the images of kids in cages—but they don’t know the full scale,” said Cassils, in an interview with Quartz.

The team aimed to set a national record with its #XMAP campaign.

Credit: In Plain Sight

The artists reached out to the only skywriting company in the country (which owns the patent on skywriting) and learned that the largest campaign executed over U.S. soil involved about 80 sites and three fleets of planes. That established the project’s framework, and from there they went about the task of bringing on collaborators, many of whom have experiences with immigration and the detainment of oppressed minority groups.

The artists they tapped vary in age, gender identity, and nationality; some are formerly incarcerated, or are descended from the descendants of Holocaust survivors. Black, Japanese-American, First Nations and Indigenous perspectives are present, speaking to the historical intersections of xenophobia, migration, and incarceration.

The protests were seen throughout Southern California – from LA to San Diego.

Credit: In Plain Sight

In Southern California, the demonstration kicked off on the 4th of July at 9:30 a.m. above the Adelanto Detention Center, before traveling to downtown L.A., where 15-character messages will be left in the late morning airspace above immigration facilities, county and federal lockups and courthouses. The planes then traveled to the Arcadia and Pomona locations of internment camps where Japanese Americans where held prisoner during World War II.

Later in the afternoon, planes were seeing typing messages in the sky above the Terminal Island detention center, before traveling further south to Orange County and San Diego, where messages were left above courts and immigration offices.

The campaign also popped up in El Paso, TX, where a massacre last year left many Latinos dead.

Credit: In Plain Sight

Binational, El Paso-based artist Margarita Cabrera activated the El Paso-Juárez portion of the performance with her message “UPLIFT: NI UNX MAS” at the Bridge of the Americas.

“Uplift” refers to uplifting immigrant communities, as well as the border fence and other immigration detention facilities. “Ni unx más” was inspired by Mexican poet and activist Susana Chávez’s 1995 phrase “ni una muerta más,” or “not one more [woman] dead.” The phrase protests femicides in Mexico, particularly in Juárez. Cabrera used X to be gender-neutral. 

“This is a call to abolish this systematic violence and the incarceration and detention of our immigrants,” Cabrera told the El Paso Times. “We’re creating a sky activation, but we’re also grounding it with local events.”

Across the border in New Mexico, “ESTOY AQUI” and “SOBREVIVIRE” were respectively written over the Otero County Processing Center and Otero County Prison Facility. The messages draw from songs respectively by Shakira and Mexican pop star Monica Naranjo. Designed by artists Carlos Motta and Felipe Baeza, the full message, “I am here, I will survive,” is intended for both detainees and outside onlookers.

“We wanted to address those in the detention sites and acknowledge the fact that they are there, that we know they are there, and that they will be fine eventually even if their conditions are precarious and they are going through a difficult time right now,” Motta told the El Paso Times.

And in New York City, several major monuments became canvases for the activists’ message.

Credit: In Plain Sight

In New York City, the words “My pain is so big” were written over a detention center in downtown Brooklyn.

“To be human,” wappeared over Rikers Island and “Carlos Ernesto Escobar Mejia,” the name of the first immigrant to die from Covid-19 in detention was projected at the Statue of Liberty monument in Ellis Island.

Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

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Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

partyshopavenue / ashantiheadwraps / Instagram

Black and Afro-Latino businesses are crucial to the growth of wealth within their communities. Latinas are the fastest-growing population of entrepreneurs. Here is a list of Black and Afro-Latino businesses you can support to help build them up.

Cafe Con Libros

Cafe Con Libros is a feminist bookstore and coffee shop serving the Brooklyn area with conversations about things that matter to the community. Though they are closed because of COVID-19, there are several ways you can continue to support the bookstore.

Azteca Negra

Azteca Negra is a textile, jewelry, and accessories line that is all about being culturally conscious. Marisol Catchings, the artist behind Azteca Negra, is a Black/Chicana artist living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Catchings also aims at recycling by reusing resources to create her products.

Kimpande Jewelry

Kimpande Jewelry is telling the history of African life and people in Puerto Rico. Eduardo Paz, the designer of the products, wanted to highlight the different African cultures brought to Puerto Rico during the slave trade. The brand is all about buying a piece of history with every piece of jewelry.

Marisel Herbal Bath & Body

Based in Puerto Rico, Marisel Herbal Bath & Body is giving people herbal and natural alternatives to the bath and body products on the market. The store, which has been dealing with the COVID-19 lockdowns, is slowly coming back to life and is offering to ship orders to customers.

Ankhari Crochet

There is something so fun about crochet. It might be that it makes us think about the vintage clothing that we have seen in our parents’ photos. It is fun, stylish, and the colors really giving us some life right now.

Ashanti Headwraps

If you are looking for some new and fun headwraps, this is the place to check out. The brand has stores in Puerto Rico and New York and the stores offer up some beautifully crafted headwraps that anyone can wear.

Pensar Africa

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Fatima – in traceable, ethically made Swag 😷😍💚 . . . Matching mask, Fanny pack and Headwrap available by custom order. DM for more information ℹ️ . . Prevention is better than cure 🦠 😷 . . Local Puerto Rican designer Sanel @disenador_sanelrivera and Pensar Africa have worked together to produced these beautiful masks to protect yourself and others from the spread of Corona Virus – best protection and prevention is to observe social distancing by staying at home but if you need to go out CDC recommends wearing a mask with two layers of tightly woven 100 percent cotton fabric. . . We have created these beautiful reversible, washable mask using high tread count pure Tanzanian 🇹🇿 cotton fabric with pellon interfacing in between for a filter. It also has a pocket to add additional filter if you choose to do so. . . Limited quantity and available in San Juan for drive through pickup only and shipped worldwide 🌍 🌎 . These masks have been disinfected, aired out, packed and ready to go. . . Fanny pack in collaboration with @jashbags . . #facetimephotoshoot with @jorlyfloress #Teamwork #togetherwecan #socialdistancing #coronavirus #protection #protectionisbetterthancure #cdcrecommendation #wearamask #stayathome #coronachronicles #protectivestyles #pensarafrica #sanelriveradiseñador #mask #facemask #santurce #sanjuan #sanjuanpuertorico #puertorico #africanprint #africanfabric #kitenge #ankaramask #africanprintmasks #afroboricua #afrolatina

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Pensar Africa is more than a place to buy things, it is a place to empower African creators. According to the website, Pensar Africa’s mission is to bring African goods to the Americas while providing the creators the opportunity to make money off of their products.

The Salvi Vegan

This food blogger is showing how you can take your favorite Salvadoran dishes and make them vegan. It is a nice reminder that not all support has to cost something. Some times you just have to show support to help those in the community attract opportunities that come with money.

Party Shop Avenue

This is one company we should keep in mind after this is all over. Who doesn’t want a nice balloon structure at their party? These are truly some beautiful pieces of art that you can use to celebrate just about anything.

READ: This Boricua Is Bringing An Indie Bookstore To Her Neighborhood Of 1.4 Million