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We Found One Of The Ugliest Christmas Sweaters Of 2019: Red Lobster Dropped A Seafood-Themed Holiday Collection And Just Look At It

Why would you give the special people in your life something they’ve seen before when you can give them unusual Christmas gifts. Rather than regular new cufflinks they might like a Red Lobster Biscuit sweater, complete with a fanny pack to store, well biscuits of course. Yup, you heard right, we’re not making this stuff up. This year, Red Lobster is selling holiday-themed merch and we’re not sure whether we love it or hate it. 

Red Lobster’s Christmas-themed collection includes an ‘ugly Christmas sweater’ with an insulated pouch —for stuffing biscuits in it.

instagram @redlobster

I don’t know about you, but for me, the holidays are all about wearing a cute, and a little eccentric outfits and of course, the food. Red Lobster gets it, and is therefore releasing all kinds of holiday-themed merch, the most notable of which is the Cheddar Bay Biscuit Sweater.

You read that right, Red Lobster opened an online shop for a limited time with all kinds of holiday merchandise.

www.redlobstershop.com

Red Lobster’s online pop-up shop is officially open for business. Not only can you pre-order the Cheddar Bay biscuit sweater, but there are also other holiday themed pieces to order. There are four different graphic t-shirts and a branded tumbler cup as well.

The Cheddar Bay Biscuit Holiday Sweater will set you back a mere $39.99. 

instagram @redlobster

The sweater is complete with an insulated pocket to hold your Cheddar Bay biscuits and keep them warm on-the-go —because, duh, the biscuits at the beginning of a Red Lobster feast are everyone’s favorites. Other pieces of clothing are emblazoned with fun sayings like the T-shirt that says “Cheddar Bay All Day” or “It’s Always Biscuit Season”—and we can’t say we don’t agree. 

As was to be expected, the lovely —and opinionated— people who inhabit Twitter, had some thoughts, and it looks like they’re just as conflicted as we are. 

Twitter @DaviSusan

Twitter user Susan Davis went as far as to ask her followers what they thought about the ultimate ‘Ugly Christmas Sweater’ much to our surprise, out of the 239 voters who participated in her survey; 79% wanted her to buy the sweater. 

Others were perplexed, dumbfounded… confused, really.

twitter @anne_blakley

A lot of us are just confused as to what made Red Lobster believe we needed a seafood-themed Christmas sweater, but also, why do we want it so bad?

Wear your love of seafood on your sleeve, or on this case… in your pouch.

instagram @redlobster

All of the t-shirts retail for about $20 and the tumbler cup is selling for $9.99, so you can show your love of seafood without breaking the bank. The shirts have fun sayings like “Cheddar Bay All Day” and “It’s Always Biscuit Season” because, duh, the biscuits at the beginning of a Red Lobster feast are the best part!

You can also wear your appetite on your sleeve —or on your knit, if you will— with our very own food-inspired ‘ugly Christmas sweater’.

www.mitushop.com

If you thought Red Lobster would be the only one making food-inspired ugly Christmas sweater, then you my friend, were mistaken. The same store that brought you ‘Guacardo’, ‘Pan Dulce’ pins and ‘Chocolate Abuelita-scented’ candles; introduces the seasonal “All I Want For Christmas… Is More Tamales” sweatshirt. 

Do you want champurrado with that sweatshirt?

www.mitushop.com

Mitú Shop released a new, limited-edition range of holiday-inspired apparel. Including the ‘More Tamales’ sweatshirt, another that reads “All I want For Christmas Is Otro Plato,” featuring a bowl of delicious caldito. Can you call this an ugly Christmas sweater when it’s being totally honest? Let these sweaters keep you cozy throughout the holidays, while letting your family know what’s on your mind and in your heart…another plate of whatever is making your stomach happy. Porque, panza llena, corazón contento.

The Christmas collection is a nod of solidarity to all of us who grew up in Latinx households and who have to eat their weight in homemade food, each year. 

www.mitushop.com

Drawing inspiration from mamás and abuelas everywhere, the collection also features an apron emblazoned with the words “Reina De Los Tamales” because if the matriarch in charge of making tamales for your family each year, is not your Reina, then idk, your priorities are not straight. 

Serape Santa hats, anyone?

www.mitushop.com

Show off your Latinx roots even on Christmas! Just in time for the holidays, we bring to you the classic cone-shaped, fuzzily adorned, Santa hat. Except our Mitú shop hat has a twist to it. Made with the iconic Mexican serape woven print, this year you can boast your cultural heritage even on Christmas. 

Día De Los Reyes Was The First Time I Allowed My S.O. To Experience My Culture

Culture

Día De Los Reyes Was The First Time I Allowed My S.O. To Experience My Culture

bolilloscafe /Instagram

For many who regularly take part in the holiday season, Christmas traditions are strongly tied to religious beliefs and practices. The ways in which the customs around the holiday season are carried out often deeply rooted in cultural rituals and they often vary from family to family. For my Puerto Rican family, the holiday season is drawn out well past the first of January when radio stations reel back on the jingles and Mariah Carey classics. For us, the Twelve Days Of Christmas sales or songs we know of don’t relate to the days leading up to December 25, but rather the twelve days in between Christmas Day and January 6 The Epiphany, a biblical day that marks the final leg of the  Three Wise Men’s journey to deliver gold, frankincense and myrrh to Jesus Christ.

Día De Los Reyes has always been an especially important day for my family. The fact that “reyes” is my mother’s maiden name has only made the day a little sweeter.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

A more popular holiday back on the island, my abuela and abuelo Reyes brought their traditions to the mainland with them in the 1950s.

On the evening of January 5, each member of my family from grandfather to my youngest sobrino pull out cardboard shoe and clothing boxes (all marked with our names, drawn on and decorated over the years with crayons, markers, and glitter pens) to take part in a tradition that we hold dear in our hearts. After we’ve filled the boxes with snacks like carrots, lettuce, and sometimes grass for the Three Kings’ camels to munch on as they pass through our town we stick the boxes under our beds. Finally, just as we would with Santa Claus, we write the Three Kings–Los Reyes–a handwritten note wishing them safe travels as the journey to see the baby Jesus hoping that as they did with him on that first Epiphany, they’ll leave a small gift or token of some sort under our boxes.

Dia De Los Reyes functions similarly to Christmas Eve in my family. We all wake up and check under our boxes to see if we were good enough this year to receive any gifts. We’d go to mass together, where as kids we’d hope that maybe Los Reyes stayed in town with their camels long enough that day to be at the church community center to pose for photos. We would visit family and eat pernil and arroz con gandules, dishes reserved for celebrations and holidays.

As I got older I went to mass only sometimes and stopped looking to get my photos with Los Reyes.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

I never stopped checking my box for gifts though, or remembering each rey by the names older relatives taught me to write in my letters: Balthasar, Melchior, and Gaspar. As an adult I focused on new ways to celebrate “being a king,” as my family would say, and took on the role of expert coquito maker.

When I started dating and began wanting to bring boyfriends home for the holidays, part of my new role during the holiday season also unintentionally became one of both gatekeeper and teacher of my Puerto Rican culture. As a sophomore in college, I brought my then boyfriend home for December for the first time. In my household, Noche Buena, Christmas Day, New Years Day, New Year’s Eve, and Dia De Los Reyes were all days set aside for family, exclusively. I knew not to ask for exceptions, and in the past had willfully or grudgingly passed up holiday and New Years parties to honor the expectation of being en familia.

But in my twenties I badly started to yearn for my first New Years kiss and wanted, even more, to share part of my twelve days of Christmas with somebody who mattered to me.

My parents, on the other hand, were hesitant. Dia De Los Reyes was about Los Reyes, as in my family.

My boyfriend was someone they saw a few times a year and knew of only from phone calls, letters, texts, and video chats. Someone so unfamiliar certainly wasn’t considered family, and moreover someone who wasn’t Latino couldn’t possibly understand the sanctity of the day we’d honored so lovingly all our lives.

Most concerning of all, Dia De Los Reyes is also known among some circles as “the poor man’s Christmas,” my grandparents’ explanation being that back in the days of Jesus, being a king didn’t mean wealth like it means today. It meant that the giftschildren and observers receive in their boxes today are small, like a $10 gift card, socks, some mittens, or maybe candy. The last thing my family needed was for some guy they didn’t know to reach into an old shoebox of all things, pull out socks, and think we were cheap. With some convincing and a little grumbling, my family allowed me to write my boyfriend’s name on a box, fill it with lettuce and put it under my bed on January 5.

That night as I lay in bed, I did feel nervous knowing that I was bringing somebody into such a special part of my life that no one had ever seen before outside of my parents. Earlier in the day, I made sure to explain to him how seriously my family took our family only traditions, and how it wasn’t just about the religious holiday but the namesake that ties us to one another. I felt silly as I highlighted decorating beat-up boxes as one of my favorite traditions, something I hadn’t ever admitted out loud. Quiet and reserved, he listened to my stories but didn’t ask any questions.

In the morning, I still had my family only morning mass and our opening of gifts, but later that day my boyfriend was invited over for pasteles, coquito, and the checking of his first and only Three Kings Day box.

My parents observed with critical eyes as he went through the motions of our traditions, seeming charmed by the gifts of a hat and gloves left resting on top of torn up shreds of lettuce, proof that Los Reyes had come through our house. As he followed our lead I sat hoping that by participating in the events himself, he might better understand where my love for my culture comes from, or maybe even briefly feel the same sense of childhood joy I do on that day each year. Admittedly, it was an awkward day for everyone involved and not filled with all the magic I had hoped for. Nonetheless, I still felt proud of myself for being able to break down a barrier that had long existed between myself and not only romantic connections but a friend, too.

I wanted the opportunity to show those outside of my family the part of my identity that I hadn’t always made transparent in my daily life, even if that meant that they didn’t understand or wouldn’t “get it” at first.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

Even though the person who got to take the test run of my family only traditions and I aren’t together anymore, a few years ago he broke the mold for being able to bring others into a part of my life I was using to shutting so many close to me out of.n Maybe he did think that of us, our gifts, or the day we celebrate as cheap, but after the fact I, didn’t care. In the years that have followed, what has mattered most to me has been that I could start sharing Reyes, this name that laid down the foundation to who I am before I was ever born, and all the nuances that come with it with those I want to know me better.

This Dia De Los Reyes will be one of a few Reyes family festivities that my current boyfriend will be participating in, and another year where my family pulls out his box and welcomes his extra cheer into our holidays. While he’s still learning about my roots, I’m still learning that I can take these moments and use them to bring myself closer to my culture and my loved ones.


Read: Twitter’s Latest Hashtag Fights Back Against The Normalization Of Death And Violence Against Migrant Youth

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Would You Like A Piece Of Tomato On Your Bread? Or A Plain Bowl Of Rice?—These Have To Be The Saddest Vegetarian Meals To Ever Happen

Culture

Would You Like A Piece Of Tomato On Your Bread? Or A Plain Bowl Of Rice?—These Have To Be The Saddest Vegetarian Meals To Ever Happen

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Myth: All Vegetarians Eat Is Sad Salads And Carrots—Check Out 12 Of The Saddest Vegetarian Meals To Ever Happen

Would You Like A Piece Of Tomato On Your Bread? Or A Plain Bowl Of Rice?—These Have To Be The Saddest Vegetarian Meals To Ever Happen

Depending On Where You Live, It Might Not Be So Hard Eating Vegetarian, But You’ll Still Probably Run Into Meals Like These: The Saddest Veggie Meals To Ever Happen

The biggest misconception about being a vegetarian? That all we eat is sad salads and plates filled with carrots. It’s not true. There’s LOTS of stuff we eat. Most vegetarians are always stuffing their face with varied deliciousness. Because there are SO MANY things that we can eat. Hummus, pizza, fancy pasta. All the stuff regular omnivores eat, just without the bacon on top. So can someone please explain why when we tell people we’re vegetarian, they immediately prepare us something along the lines of these 12 sad meals? Stop the madness. Stop the carb load. Check out these 12 photos to witness some of the saddest vegetarian meals to ever happen.

Airplane Carbs 

Plane meals are always a bit disappointing — even for meat eaters. On this occasion, even the flight crew felt bad for the poor man.  If this isn’t a serious carb load, then what is?  

Broccoli and fries

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My share #sadVegetarian #stillYummy

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Many vegetarians have settled for a side order of fries as their main, but with this sad piece of broccoli to boot? Do better.

When the menu says “Toast with Mushrooms” 

You must always remember to BYOVB (bring your own vegan burger) to barbecues, otherwise you might get stuck with a piece of toast and literal mushrooms –no seasoning in sight. No thank you.

When the family forgets you’re vegetarian at Christmas dinner 

Another case of BYOVB* because there’s a near 100% chance that you’ll be stuck with 2 vegetarian sides at the family dinner.

A sad vegetarian breakfast

When your only viable option for breakfast is a hashbrown, you load up —and add lots of coffee. 

An epically sad vegetarian lunch option at school

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Tbh still thinking about this meal ????????????????

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Ahh, nothing like an apple, a banana and an empty hotdog bun to fuel you up after a morning of studies. NOT.

When there are no vegetarian options at the restaurant so rice is all you can have 

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A world without rice is no world at all

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Depending on where you live, it might not be so hard eating vegetarian. But you’ll still probably run into situations where your only option is a sad plate of plain rice. Sigh.

Soggy tofu and tomato sauce as the only vegetarian option when eating out

Isn’t eating out fun? The answer is, no, not always. I don’t really know what I would do if I was handed a sliced piece of bland tofu and some tomato sauce. Like, what am I supposed to do with this? 

When the only vegetarian options at Thanksgiving dinner are green beans and potatoes

Personally, this is the most tragic one. There you are, eating your green beans while the rest of the family stuffs their face with all the options. Cries internally.

When sweet potatoes are your only safe option

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Only sad vegans don't use seasoning #filetmignon

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Always carry a sweet potato, you never know when it might save you from starving. 

We’ve all had to settle for a side salad but COME ON

When grandma has her birthday party and everyone brings food to the barbecue —dang, not even a pasta dish?

Is this a sandwich or a hotdog or both?

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Is this a hotdog or a sandwich or both or neither

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This sad excuse for a sandwich –but at least this vegetarian learned his lesson and brought his own damn veggie dog to the cookout.