Fierce

Boricuas Are Using Makeup To Protest Governor Ricardo Rosselló And Highlight The U.S.’s Horrifying History Of Colonialism

Since last week, protests have erupted all over Puerto Rico as the island’s population campaigns to remove the current governor of the United States territory. After many government scandals, Governor Ricardo Rosselló has finally agreed to step down and resign from his post. The disgraced head of government is expected to hand over control of the island to Puerto Rico’s new Progressive Party. This comes after controversy following leaked private chats revealing the governor and his inside circle making mocking and degrading comments. It also precedes federal agents arresting members of Rosselló’s administration for alleged fraud and money laundering.

Thousands of Puerto Rican protesters flooded the streets of the island — chanting and demanding resignation. Celebrities like Bad Bunny and Ricky Martin flew to the island to join in the protests. Even Puerto Ricans in mainland America took to the streets in elaborate displays, doing the electric slide to the blaring music that accompanied the gathering.

All of these factors helped to rectify this unjust situation in PR but we would be totally in the wrong if we did not acknowledge the powerful makeup and face painting that also rallied resistors.

Twitter / @oppsyirwin

Twitter User Shaly Torres made it her mission to keep non-Spanish speakers in the loop with what is happening in Puerto Rico. In a thread pinned to her account, the Puerto Rican make up enthusiast shared pictures and information about the ongoing riots. In her thread, there was a common theme of showcasing protesters and their creative way of using makeup to express their demands.

In it, she encouraged makeup artists to take a stand with the protesting Puerto Ricans and don bold make up looks in support of their struggle.

Twitter / @oppsyirwin

It doesn’t take a lot to show your support for a movement. You don’t even have to be in the same area that a protest is impacting. Thanks to social media and the internet, we can connect with people across the world and understand their feelings. We can show them our support in both small and significant ways and that is what Torres encouraged in her post.

Across Twitter and Instagram, makeup artists and enthusiasts showed off their official face paint to honor the protesters in Puerto Rico.

Twitter / @melolops

To protest the sexual violence, fraud, and abuse that the corrupt Puerto Rican government has been perpetuating, some artists scrawled abusive words over their bodies and faces. This Twitter makeup artist painted the Puerto Rican flag upon her face near the word “Enough.” Her post asks, “Asi o mas claro” — is it clear enough what these protesters are asking for?

Protesters weren’t afraid to paint graphic images on their bodies to show the pain that they’ve endured thanks to this administration.

Twitter / @melolops

This protester painted “Dios nos libera del dinero” (God save us from money) — representing the financial corruption that Rosselló’s administration has used to rule over the Puerto Rican people. On her back is a hand holding a machete, thrust up in revolution. It’s accompanied by the rainbow flag to represent the discrimination that the LGBTQ+ community currently faces in Puerto Rico.

A common theme among the face paint was that the fires of revolution have caught and are now burning.

Twitter / @dversadi
This gorgeous revolutionary art shows its artist @dversadi engulfed in flames from the neck up. The fire licks up her cheeks to the dual Puerto Rican flags made up by her elaborate eye makeup. The look is made even more empowering when viewed under UV lights. She looks like a living embodiment of the revolution that the island is experiencing.

Support for the PR protesters has reached far and wide. This one, for example, comes from an artist in Connecticut.

Twitter / @moralesgian291

Makeup artist, Gian Morales, showed his support with this breathtaking paint job. Making himself the Puerto Rican flag, Morales depicts himself with tape sealing his mouth — no doubt a nod to how voiceless the current administration has made its citizens. His gorgeous eye makeup should be appreciated for the work of art that it is as well.

Protesters have gone above and beyond to make sure their message is heard.

Twitter / @molinangelia

Anchor for CBS News, David Begnaud, pointed out just how incredible the PR protesters are and he wondered what other innovative ways citizens will show their support of the revolution. He tweeted:

“I have to say: Puerto Ricans are the most creative protesters I’ve ever covered. Under the water In the water Yoga. What’s next?”

He was answered by Twitter user @monlinangelia who shared a picture of herself skydiving with the phrase, “Ricky Renuncia” painted on her arm. We have to call this one of the most daring protests we’ve seen during this conflict.

We aren’t sure what will change in the near future to improve conditions in Puerto Rico but we know that the citizens of the island will hold their new government accountable. They have the support of their people and the Latinx community around the world. One thing is clear: we can’t deny that these incredible makeup looks have made their mark on the revolution.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Morphe and Lisa Frank Have Teamed Up For a Nostalgic Makeup Collection That Is Perfect For ’90s Babies

Fierce

Morphe and Lisa Frank Have Teamed Up For a Nostalgic Makeup Collection That Is Perfect For ’90s Babies

Courtesy Morphe

Good news for ’90s babies! The popular Morphe x Lisa Frank makeup collection is back in stock! The bright-colored school supplies brand and the budget-friendly makeup brand are, once again, teaming up for a collection to end all collections.

Last week, Morphe announced that they’re not only relaunching their Lisa Frank collection, but they were adding new products to the cult-favorite line.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Lisa Frank (@lisafrank)

Both makeup-lovers and Lisa Frank-lovers (and let’s be honest, there’s quite a bit of overlap here) can have fun with this team-up. The collection crossover originally debuted in November of last year to great fanfare.

At the time, the collab was everything millenials had been hoping for. “We hope the elevated packaging and iconic Lisa Frank spirit, combined with Morphe’s trusted formulas, will bring happiness and excitement as the consumer interacts with the collection from beginning to end,” Lisa Frank Inc. said.

While November’s launch was a three-piece collection, this release has the added bonus of a lip-crayon trio.

Last year, the Morphe x Lisa Frank collection consisted of a brush set, an eye shadow palette and a set of sponges–all created to look like the iconic Lisa Frank Inc. brand. This time around, they raised the stakes a bit and got into the lip-game.

While the lip crayons are packaged in Lisa Frank’s signature psychedelic colors, the lip pigments themselves are neutral. And, not to mention, gorgeous. Based off of the swatching, the colors will look good on all skin tones. The crayons’ shades are “Lifetime Fan”, “Kid at Heart”, and “Friends 4 Ever”.

Morphe’s iconic 35B palette was also Frankified to be brighter, bolder, and more playful.

The eyeshadow shades had names like “Playtime Kittens”, “Rainbow Chaser”, and “Prancing Unis”. Based off of those shade names, its safe to say that Morphe really dedicated itself to the Lisa Frank theme.

And as if the collab couldn’t get any better, the eyeshadow palette comes in three different covers: Zoomer & Zorbit, Forrest, and Prancing Unis.

So far, customers have been raving about the quality of the Morphe x Lisa Frank collection items.

“So so pretty and bright!” wrote one reviewer of the 35B palette. “Lots to play with & gives me nostalgia for when I was obsessed with Lisa.” (Weren’t we all??)

“I used to have a binder full of everything Lisa Frank so this palette was a NEED for me. I highly recommend it!” wrote another. “The shades aren’t patchy, they blend beautifully, and the color scheme is perfect.”

The collection is currently available at ULTA.com & Morphe.com and we can’t wait to try! Will you be checking it out?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Things That Matter

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Photo via George W. Davis, Public Domain

Today, March 22nd marks Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud in Puerto Rico–the date that marks the emancipation of slaves in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, enslaved peoples were emancipated in 1873–a full decade after the U.S. officially abolished slavery. But unlike the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico celebrates today as an official holiday, where many businesses are closed.

The emancipation of Puerto Rican slaves was a very different process than the United States’. For one, the emancipation was gradual and over three years.

When the Spanish government abolished slavery in Puerto Rico 1873, enslaved men and women had to buy their freedom. The price was set by their “owners”. The way the emancipated slaves bought their freedom was through a process that was very similar to sharecropping in the post-war American south. Emancipated slaves farmed, sold goods, and worked in different trades to “buy” their freedom.

In the same Spanish edict that abolished slavery, slaves over the age of 60 were automatically freed. Enslaved children who were 5-years-old and under were also automatically freed.

Today, Black and mixed-race Puerto Ricans of Black descent make up a large part of Puerto Rico’s population.

The legacy of enslaved Black Puerto Ricans is a strong one. Unlike the United States, Puerto Rico doesn’t classify race in such black-and-white terms. Puerto Ricans are taught that everyone is a mixture of three groups of people: white Spanish colonizers, Black African slaves, and the indigenous Taíno population.

African influences on Puerto Rican culture is ubiquitous and is present in Puerto Rican music, cuisine, and even in the way that the island’s language evolved. And although experts estimate that up to 60% of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry, almost 76% of Puerto Ricans identified as white only in the latest census poll–a phenomenon that many sociologists have blamed on anti-blackness.

On Puerto Rico’s Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud, many people can’t help but notice that the island celebrates a day of freedom and independence when they are not really free themselves.

As the fight for Puerto Rican decolonization rages on, there is a bit of irony in the fact that Puerto Rico is one of the only American territories that officially celebrates the emancipation of slaves, when Puerto Rico is not emancipated from the United States. Yes, many Black Americans recognize Juneteenth (June 19th) as the official day to celebrate emancipation from slavery, but it is not an official government holiday.

Perhaps, Puerto Rico celebrates this historical day of freedom because they understand how important the freedom and independence is on a different level than mainland Americans do.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com