Fierce

Primas Are Sharing What Makes Their Bonds Just As Special As A Sisterhood

Family is very important to the Latinidad. It isn’t just our immediate blood connections that hold powerful meaning to us, it’s also our family that has become close to us through shared experiences. Besides friends and found family, our primas can definitely be put into this group. Whether they’re related by blood or just by proximity, our primas mean so much to us. Our co-conspiritors, our best friends and the women who will always have our backs, the bond we have with our primas makes us stronger. It’s worth celebrating that.

We asked our FIERCE readers to tell us what their primas mean to them and what we got was a comments section full of a whole lot of love and heart emojis. Combined with some of our favorite internet posts, these comments remind us just how precious that bond with our primas our. This is sure to make you want to send a text to the family group chat to tell your primas how much you love them.

1. Primas equal sisterhood

Instagram / @coisasdemaaria

“In Mexico we call primas Primas-Hermanas (sister-cousin) to the ones who’s parents are siblings with our parents . In a sense an extension of sisterhood. We grew up closer than most.” — @killacarm

2. That one person who will always have your back.

Instagram / @luz_altamirano_18

“My primas were my sisters growing up and still are. We may not see each other every day or see eye to eye on everything but we have each others’ backs. ❤️”  — @its__peaches 

3. The one you can always vent to.

Instagram / @carlamariacarreiro

“Our at home therapy session. I miss those.” — @lizvaldillez

4. Primas eventually become tias.

Instagram / @priscila_henriique

“I’m an only child…not by choice. My parents were hit by a drunk driver while my mom was pregnant with my brother. My parents were saved but had complications. Like you, I am so blessed to have many cousins and Tias who added me to the pack of kids. Now as a mom myself ( 2 children) we still reach out to one another. My primas have kids in college and they are at out place all the time.Im officially mom when mom is miles away. I know they would they too would be there for my kids! The love and support continue. ❤️❤️” — @ryonmichelle

5. Your prosperity is their prosperity.

Twitter / @mayasouhaid

“My prima always helped me get jobs when I needed money to get stuff for my daughter. ❤️❤️❤️ ” — @nerdalous.13

6. They’re there for the good times and the bad.

Instagram / @babyqueilane

“Some of my cousins have been my best friends for sure! They were ride or die!” — @pryz

7. Your personal secret keeper.

Instagram / @stedejesus

“Over the years it was like having that one sis you can confide in.” — @la.dayysii

8. The ultimate Squad Goals.

Twitter / @Jufroees

Before Squad goals was a thing, our first clique was our primas. They’re always be live-long members of the crew.

9. Our permanent dance partner.

Instagram / @latinaapproved

It’s not a party without our primas. Whether it’s a quince or just a family BBQ, the party doesn’t start until we are reunited with these girls.

10. The only one who can joke with us like this.

Instagram / @wearemitu

Coming from anyone else, these would be fighting words but our primas know us that way so it’s all good.

Ultimately, our primas are everything to us.

Instagram / @biancafoliveiral

“My prima is my fuckin’ everything. Mi hermana, my best friend, my advisor, my shoulder to cry on…TODO.” — @oriettareadmai

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2o72yY8wgY&t=64s 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Jenny Solares Is One IG Creator Everyone Needs To Follow

Culture

Jenny Solares Is One IG Creator Everyone Needs To Follow

A year in quarantine has led so many of us to doom scroll and get lost in social media. As a result, some people are getting more recognition and one person who should be getting your attention is Jenny Solares, or @es_jenny_solares on Instagram.

Jenny Solares is here with the relatable content we all want.

The Guatemalan content creator knows what the people want to see. How many times have you heard someone say that they like a woman who can eat? Well, as Jenny urges, prove it, y’all. Take your lady out and get her all of the food that she wants. Let’s go!

Now, that’s how you add salsa to someone’s food. If you didn’t already think this way when adding salsa to your tacos, you definitely will now. It’s just impossible not to.

We also love seeing her collaborating with Estefania Saavedra, a fellow Latina creator. A rising tide lifts all boats so we appreciate seeing these Latinas working together.

Solares is even creating brand new identities.

Cholas will forever have a place in our hearts. We know cholas. We love cholas. We are related to cholas. Solares’ creation of the glola is truly a work of art. Just because you’re a chola doesn’t mean you can’t love glitter and colors.

She’s even got some of the Covid humor in check.

There are going to be so many school assignments about this year in the coming years. Kids will be learning about the time the world stood still as we battled an out-of-control virus. It is going to be us having to tell the little ones about that time and it’s going to be rough. Get ready to reliving everything we have been dealing with for the last year.

On top of all of the comedy, Solares is ready to show her fans some real love for their support.

“Thank you all for letting me be me. Thank you for appreciating my silliness, my craziness, my songs, my dances, my imperfections,” Solares tells her fans in a year-end video. “Thank you for letting me be myself. This year was full of so much sadness, uncertainty, frustration, and, for a lot of people, loneliness. Thank you all for not letting me feel that loneliness.”

Thank you, Jenny. Your comedy has been a bright spot for so many during an incredibly hard and sad year.

READ: Instagram Fitness Gurus To Follow For Your 2021 Goals

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Woman Who Watched Her Mother Die Before Her Eyes While At Sea As A 9-Year-Old Reunited With Her Rescuers

Fierce

Woman Who Watched Her Mother Die Before Her Eyes While At Sea As A 9-Year-Old Reunited With Her Rescuers

May 20, 1986, started out for Desireé Rodriguez and her family as an idyllic morning.

At the time, Desireé’s father (a 30-year-old construction worker by the name of Thomas Rodriguez) had taken her, her mother, and sister as well an aunt and uncle out to Catalina Island for a day of sailing. The plan was to go out, fish, and bask in the summer sun before heading back home. In the evening, just as they were headed home the family was impacted by a dense fog. Desireé and her 5-year-old sister Trisha awoke from a nap on the boat to calls from her father to abandon ship and within minutes the entire family was lost at sea. Out in the water and away from their boat that had capsized.

 The family of six was stranded in the chilly Pacific water for hours and Desireé watched as her father first went to swim for rescue and never returned. In the hours that slowly stretched by Desireé witnessed the death of her sister, her mother, her uncle and then her aunt.

Decades have passed since her family’s accident but Desireé has lived to tell of the story thanks to the two men who rescued her.

In a recent piece by The New York times, Desireé was reunited with the two men who were remarkably able to save her after she spent a nightmarish 20 hours in the ocean.

Only 9-years-old at the time of the tragic events, Desireé recalls believing that her father would return with help when he first swam away from the boat. “My dad was like the superhero to me. I actually thought he would get help,” Desireé explained before calling the desperate hours that followed. After watching her family members die, she found herself all alone.

“At that point, I just kind of made the decision, I need to get away from this boat,” Desireé recalled to the New York Times. “I need to swim away, somewhere else. … Where? I don’t know.”

Just when Desireé decided to give up hope, the skipper of a commercial sportfishing boat spotted her orange life jacket in the water.

The boat’s first officer leapt into the water and fished Desireé out of the water. Desireé was ultimately transported back to San Pedro and never saw her rescuers again.

“I don’t think I would have lived, I’ll be honest with you. I think at that point, I was just kind of done,” Desireé explained in a recent interview about the incident. According to an article at the time that described the incident, Desireé had suffered no major physical injuries and was “in good spirits.” She left the hospital in San Pedro the next time.

“I had even hoped that my dad did make it somewhere,” Desireé explained of her thinking of the time. “Maybe he is living on an island and just got amnesia and didn’t know that he has a family. You know, you always have hope. But you get older, and reality sets in, and you’re like, OK. He didn’t make it.”

Paul Strasser and Mark Pisano, the two men who rescued her, ultimately earned commemorative plaques for their bravery from Mayor Tom Bradley. Desireé Rodriguez, now Desireé Campuzano, was adopted by another aunt and uncle who raised her. She went onto attend junior college in Fullerton, built herself a career in criminal justice, married and had a son. Still, she always wondered what had happened to the men who saved her.

It wasn’t until the COVID-19 pandemic that Strasser and Pisano came into contact with Philip Friedman who launched a podcast about his hobby as a fisherman.

“Friedman Adventures” which launched this past December, shares incredible stories from fishermen. Ine one episode Pisano spoke about the 1986 rescue.

“It’s kind of a weird story, kind of like there are some supernatural qualities,” Pisano explained of the experience on the podcast.

Friedman felt motivated to unite the two rescuers and Desireé. Ultimately a friend of Desireé’s heard the episode when it aired and made the connection. He reached out to Desireé and then Friedman and ultimately she and her rescuers were reunited.

“I was nervous at first,” Desireé said of meeting Strasser and Pisano “just seeing [the] guys and putting kind of finalization to the ‘what happened.’” The three were finally reunited during another episode of the podcast.

“I feel like she’s sort of our daughter, in a way, because we brought her back to life,” Strasser said during their reunion. “Even though we never knew each other.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com