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Jessica Alba And Valentina Are Some Of The Opening Ceremony’s ‘Year Of Mexico’ Faces

In the heart of the SoHo district of Manhattan, there’s a very unique store that stands out among the rest. It’s a shop called Opening Ceremony that was founded in 2002 by Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, two friends that met while students at UC Berkeley. The store can be compared to that one cool person in high school that had the best style, but you could never quite place where they actually shopped. Opening Ceremony is that place. The store combines a curated collection from Lim and Leon that takes clothes from the very best designers in the world, and emerging ones too, and sells it all under one roof. They’re also the creative directors of KENZO. All of this is to say, Opening Ceremony is the bomb, and here’s their latest inspiring campaign. 

In June, Opening Ceremony announced they’d pay tribute to Mexico and its people by featuring campaign entirely dedicated to the country, and they’re calling it, “The Year of Mexico.”

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

“Throughout our lives, and particularly through our Year of Mexico project, we have been privileged enough to witness the breadth of talent and soul that emanates from the Mexican community. In our current political climate, and at a most crucial time to celebrate diversity on both our home front and abroad, we decided to bring together friends new and old who pioneer conversation in the global cultural dialogue,” Leon stated on their website. 

A critical aspect of this campaign is that it shows how non-Latino creatives can be inspired by Latin culture without appropriating from it.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

Opening Ceremony is not taking designs from Latino designers. They are not featuring non-Latino models to wear Mexican brands. Everything about this campaign begins and starts with Mexican people, even down to the photographer. In this case, every image was shot by acclaimed photographer Stefan Ruiz. Opening Ceremony is also partnering with the nonprofit group Fondos Semillas — the largest fund in Mexico dedicated to supporting women’s causes and working closely with women-led grassroots groups with the goal of improving the living conditions of local communities and promoting gender equality.”

Now let’s take a look at some of their beautiful models.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

The campaign is perfectly titled “The Familia: A Portrait Series,” and it features “inspiring and influential figures in the Mexican creative community,” Opening Ceremony posted on Instagram. “The series, shot in Los Angeles and New York, captures a cast of established and emerging individuals – artists, actors, chefs, designers, musicians, photographers, entrepreneurs, multi-hyphenates – that exemplify the power of Mexican creativity today.” 

The campaign features a slew of influential Mexican and Mexican-American creatives, including chef Daniela Soto-Innes.

 Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

Soto-Innes gained worldwide recognition when she was named World’s Best Female Chef by the World’s 50 Best Restaurant.

Drag star Valentina.

 Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

Valentina may have made her name as a cast member on the reality TV show “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” but her influence is an undeniable sensation that can be seen and heard everywhere. 

There’s also Jessica Alba.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

The longtime Latina actress who doesn’t typically talk about her Mexican roots seems to be coming around. She stated on Instagram that she’s an “entrepreneur (forever), entertainer (sometimes), loyal friend (always), serious cuddler, terrible speller, self-taught, truth-seeking, boundary-pushing, outlier-oriented, future-facing, detail-obsessed, tequila-loving, Mexican-American, So-Cal native and chingona for real.” Okay, girl!

L.A.-based artist Rafa Esparza.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

About his creative process, Esparza says, “I work with land when I make things, many times adobe bricks used to construct brown architectures that confront white spaces and their legacy of white supremacy,” he explained on Instagram. About his new artwork, he said he is diving into “(I’m)migration and the hundreds of concentration camps and detention centers profiting off of the inhumane, daily hauling of migrants throughout the country.”

The campaign also features Cassie, among many others.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

Cassie has had a pretty phenomenal year. Not only did she break up with P Diddy after more than a decade, but she’s now engaged to her new beau and expecting her first baby. 

“My current project is becoming a mother, and I can’t wait to experience the transformation that comes through motherhood, especially in creating new music and visuals. I’m an artist at heart,” she said on IG. “Like every woman, I’ve gone through many significant transitions in life that have taught me so much about myself and the woman that I want to become. I’m focused on becoming.”

We also love seeing the designs of Equihua for sale at Opening Ceremony.

Credit: openingceremony / Instagram

As you may recall, we interviewed fashion designer Brenda Equihua last year because we fell in love with her San Marcos-inspired jackets and coats. This year she’s also selling San Marcos-inspired hoop earings, scrunchies, shoes, and much more. 

We just love that Opening Ceremony is shining the line on talented Mexicanos who’s work should be exposed to the world. 

Click here to see more.

READ: This Fashion Designer Is Turning San Marcos Blankets Into Stunning Streetwear

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This TikTok Hack Shows A Pretty Cool Way To Grow Your Own Avocados At Home

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This TikTok Hack Shows A Pretty Cool Way To Grow Your Own Avocados At Home

@BradCanning/ TikTok

As the pandemic continues to carry us into the infinite unknown the only thing that we can be certain of is that keeping ourselves entertained, busy, and happy is essential. Of course, any plant lover knows that one of the most simple pleasures in life is having some homegrown vegetables in the kitchen. If you’re quarantining and doing all that you can to avoid public spaces like grocery stores this truth goes double.

Recently, a TikTok user uploaded a quick tutorial on how to make your very own avocado plant using supplies you probably have around the house as well as that avocado seed you most definitely toss out way too often. We broke down the steps for you below and they’re pretty easy!

Check them out below.

Here’s what you’ll need

  • Avocado seed
  • Water 
  • Paper towels
  • Ziploc bags
  • A vase or glass

1. Once you’ve cut the avocado hold on to the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

As TikTok user @BradCanning points out save the seed! As you’re preparing your avocado for a feast, be sure to avoid cutting into the seed.

2. Remove the outer layer of the seed by peeling it off

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Run the seed underwater then dry it. Once it’s dried up, peel off the skin with your fingers to make sure the seed doesn’t go moldy.

3. Allow the seed to sprout and grow a root by wrapping it in a paper towel and putting it in a Ziplock bag

@BradCanning/ TikTok

After the seed has been in the bag for two to three weeks, it’s time to pull it out and crack it open.

4. Fill a jar with water and suspend the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

According to Canning’s TikTok “Put the root in water and it will start to sprout … be careful though, this is a total addiction.”

Make sure to place only the roots or half of the seed in water. To do this, Canning used a vase with an opening that fits around the diameter of the seed. Note: others often insert wooden pegs into the seed to suspend it above the water. The root will slowly grow into the water below which means you’ve got a healthy growing plant on your hands.

5. Once the plant gets to a good size pot it in soil.

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Once the plant gets to a good size you can pot it in soil or in a bigger vase to ensure that it keeps growing. According to SF Gate, “After that, the plant takes 10 to 15 years to grow large enough to fruit, which it only does in suitable growing conditions. In U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 12, it’s safe to grow avocado plants outside. In colder zones, they make attractive houseplants but are unlikely to bear fruit.”

For the full video check it out here.

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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