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Nike’s N7 Fund Supports Native American Youths And For It’s 10th Anniversary They Designed A Navajo-Inspired Commemorative Collection

Nike’s N7 collection is celebrating 10 years of supporting Native American and aboriginal communities. The iconic sportswear brand teamed up with Pendleton Prints, the American textile company from Portland, Oregon, to create an anniversary collection that features Native American prints and patterns to honor Navajo heritage through design. 

Nike’s N7 Fund is inspired by Native American wisdom of the Seven Generations: in every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the seventh generation.

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The Nike N7 Fund supports organizations that provide sport and physical activity programming to youth in Native American communities. The fund helps them reach their greatest potential through play and sport and creates more equal playing fields for all. Since 2009, the N7 Fund has awarded more than $7.5 million in grants to 259 communities and organizations —and this year, it’s turning 10. 

Tracie Jackson, a graphic designer at Nike, is passing along her grandmother’s legacy in the 10th anniversary of the Nike N7 collection. 

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Upon going blind in old age, Phoebe Nez continued to weave rugs in the Navajo tradition, teaching her young great-granddaughter Tracie Jackson how to take up the craft. The member of the Black Streaked Wood People clan of the Navajo Nation (“Tsi’naajinii”) taught Jackson that every color and shape has a purpose that can be altered by many influences, such as creation stories, the environment and individual experiences. Nez committed her designs to memory, continuing to teach Jackson as her eyesight slowly faded.

Without my great-grandmother, I wouldn’t have learned about my culture, and without my culture, I wouldn’t have been a designer. My family ties are what influence my native identity.” says Jackson.

The collection includes blankets, sneakers, sweatshirts, and t-shirts all containing the storm pattern. 

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This pattern was a favorite of Jackson’s great grandmother and contains meaningful elements like zig-zags that represent lightning and the step patterns signifying the Mesas of Monument Valley in AZ. The pattern is a narrative tapestry of Jackson’s Navajo history, which specializes in designs personal to the individual weaver. Those living in different geographical regions will experience different environments. As the weaver becomes more skilled, he or she creates original designs based on the influences of classic works, personalizing the pieces with different colors and yarns.

Nike’s and Pendleton’s relationship dates back to 2008. 

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Nike first collaborated with the brand over 10 years ago. The sportswear label released ACG x Pendleton All-Mountain collection in an original print back in 2008. They joined forces again in 2013 on another collaboration, this time creating a tee, a jacket, a couple of sneakers and a commemorative blanket. 

But it wasn’t until 2017 when the two companies created a commemorative blanket for PK80 College Basketball Tournament. 

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The 2017 Phil Knight Invitational was a 16 team college basketball event held in Pendleton’s hometown of Portland, Oregon. The tournament was organized to honor Nike’s co-founder Phil Knight’s 80th birthday. 

N7’s 10-year anniversary collection, the design is Navajo-inspired and the storm pattern appears consistently.

The storm pattern appears throughout this year’s collection consistently, which also includes hoodies, leggings, joggers and more. Participating college basketball teams this year, will wear Nike N7 x Pendleton’s long sleeve crew as shooting shirts over their turquoise uniforms. 

Jackson also put her spin on the classic Nike Air Zoom Pegasus. 

www.nike.com

The Pegasus 36 N7 x Pendleton will commemorate the running womanhood ceremony that is customary among Navajo circles. “I’m very hands-on with my design process. A lot of native runners reached out to me asking for an N7 version of the Pegasus shoe. And I want to bring the voices of our community in,” she explained. “As native people, our feet are actually wider and flat, so the Pegasus shoe is the most ideal shoe for our body when it comes to running.”

We love to see this kind of representation done so sensibly, ethically and responsibly by brands as big as Nike. Ideally, more brands would pursue diversity —simply because it’s the right thing to do— to be more tone-aware and in touch with customers from every point of the spectrum. It doesn’t take a lot to realize that a diverse workforce that thrives in an inclusive culture leads to a higher level of innovation and an all-round stronger brand that everyone can relate to —maybe that’s why Nike remains as everyone’s favorite, after years and years. Here’s to seeing more projects like N7 come to fruition. 

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We Found The Looks Rocked By Ariana Grande, Megan Thee Stallion, And Doja Cat In The Sexy ’34+35′ Remix Video

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We Found The Looks Rocked By Ariana Grande, Megan Thee Stallion, And Doja Cat In The Sexy ’34+35′ Remix Video

In a gift to lovers, Ariana Grande dropped her “34+35” remix music video last Friday. The trending video featured Doja Cat and Megan Thee Stallion and some slamming tunes, extraordinarily glam sleepover gear. To booth, the video already racked up 21 million views, served up, alongside some slamming tunes, extraordinarily glam sleepover gear.

From ultra sexy to supersensuous, Ari, Meg, and Doja wore beautiful and luxurious lingerie ensembles. Fortunately, they’re here for you to rock yourself!

We looked around for the ensembles online and found them! Check out the looks below!

Ari’s Charlotte High Waist Bottoms and bodysuit.

Fleur de Mal / Charlotte High Waist Bottom– $45

Victoria’s Secret/ Lace Plunge Teddy- $79.50

Meg’s pink lace bra worn with mini shorts and a matching robe.

Milena Plunge Underwired Bra– $145

Milena Full Brief– $70

Doja’s peach-colored lace corset, with suspender bottoms.

Doja also wore outfits from Agent Provocateur.

Essie/ Waspie– $195

Essie/ Bodysuit– $465

Check out the video remix below!

So there they are, the extremely sultry and iconic lingerie looks to recreate the 34+35 remix music video on your own time!

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Amidst SNL Skit, Gorilla Glue Woman Says She Is Still Recovering From Her Sudden Internet Fame And Cyberbullying

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Amidst SNL Skit, Gorilla Glue Woman Says She Is Still Recovering From Her Sudden Internet Fame And Cyberbullying

Updated Feb. 22, 2021.

We can all appreciate the diversity and spring backness of Black hair. Typically curly or kinky in texture, Black hair allows women and men alike the ability to style their hair in just about every which rich way. From sporting a thick and out there afro to tresses that are layed and slayed, Black hair can do it all. So much so that some consider Black hair to be a superpower.

However, Black hair isn’t all-powerful. When it comes to glue in particular, a very sad TikToker recently figured that out.

TikTok user im_d_ollady, real name is Tessica Brown, explained that she got herself into a pretty sticky situation thanks to Gorilla Glue.

In early February, Brown posted a video to her TikTok page and revealed that her hair has been stuck in the same slicked-back style for a month now. Explaining the situation, Brown started off sharing that she often turns to a glue spray product called göt2b when styling her hair “just to keep it in place.”

But when she ran out of göt2b glue spray she turned to a can of Gorilla Glue spray adhesive.

The Gorilla Glue advises that the product is “heavy-duty.” According to the Gorilla Glue’s website, “Gorilla Spray Adhesive forms a clear, permanent bond that is moisture resistant and can be used on projects both indoors and out. This spray adhesive is also photo safe. Its wide pad nozzle and controlled, fine mist spray provide an even application on the project you are working on.”

Gorilla Glue’s FAQ advises “wiping adhesive with a dry cloth and then washing the area with soap and water,” to remove the product if it gets on your skin or body while still wet. “Once cured, rinse well with water.”

No doubt the commentary on her hair has been overwhelming for Brown. Recently her attorney sent a cease and desist letter to a blogger who is described as having gone “way too far” in an online campaign that accuses Brown of being a “liar.”

Brown says what has been particularly difficult to deal with however are the comments by Black women who she once admired, including Wendy Williams and LisaRaye McCoy. Recently, her hair incident inspired a sketch for Saturday Night Live.

In her “Hot Topics” segment of the Feb. 8 episode of The Wendy Williams Show, Williams suggested Brown “might have something wrong with her, like mentally.”

“The thing is, I used to like Wendy,” Brown told Buzzfeed news. “We just had a whole watch party to watch her Lifetime movie. I mean, I really liked it, but, I mean, then it made me very angry.”

The Louisiana woman recently got her first new hairstyle since having her hair fixed.

Brown headed to Below Zero Salon in Violet Louisiana for her Valentine’s Day hair appointment and left with a shorter, cuter look. Not only does it look good on her, but it also pairs well with her new level of clout. Along with a new merchandise line, Brown also recently partnered with manager Gina Rodriguez of Gitoni, an agency that represents celebrities like Blac Chyna, Lamar Odom and Tommy Lee.

Brown headed to L.A. earlier last week to have procedure to remove the hair operation by a plastic surgeon.

Dr. Michael Obeng  successfully removed all of the “Gorilla Glue out of her hair” with the help of a special formula he created.

Video taken at Dr. Obeng’s office show’s Tessica sitting on an operating table after the procedure running her hands through her liberated tresses and tearing up with relief. Dr. Obeng used a custom mix of chemicals and natural products to dissolve the glue.

Speaking to TMZ., Dr. Obeng said that he “looked up the compound, the main active ingredient in Gorilla Glue: polyurethane” before figuring out the science of how to break it down.

Brown’s circumstance highlights the lack of general understanding of Black hair care and the extremes Black women go through to obtain even just sufficient products.

Many users have questioned and criticized Brown’s use of Gorilla Glue asking how she could do this to herself.

“Gorilla Glue isn’t even on the hair aisle in the hair store or the grocery store. Gorilla Glue is located in the hardware section. She knew better,” one user commented about the situationTwitter. But in reality, Black women are often forced to search outside of the hair care aisles to get products for their hair. Black women, and other women too, use products like avocados, olive oil, honey, eggs and even mayonnaise to make their hair healthy.

As one Twitter user pointed out often times hair products are packaged to purposefully resemble food products.

The truth is , as user @_knotURfrend_, pointes out if Brown’s Gorilla Glue use had actually worked, it likely would have gone viral as a new product go-to. “So many are being dismissive of #gorillagluegirl. Given the history of how black women are targeted and still battle the pervasive belief that our natural hair is unprofessional, unkempt, or in some way ‘a statement’ pls show her some grace and understanding,” The View’s Sunny Hostin tweeted.

Brow’s hair looks amazing in the video but it’s clear it was heavily sprayed and shows no sign of letting up.

“Bad, bad, bad idea,” Brown says in the video..

“My hair don’t move,” Brown goes on to share while she scratching at her hair and noting that she washed her hair 15 times to no avail.

Brown finishes her video saying “So if you ever run out of Göt2B glue spray, don’t ever, ever use this,” she says, holding up the Gorilla Glue can, “unless you want your hair to be like that.”

Brown’s video has garnered over 2 million views on her TikTok page.

Many users were quick to point out that the old trusty Moco de Gorila could have been confused for Gorilla Glue. The woman did make a point of noting that she’d run out of Göt2b Glued Blasting Freeze Hairspray before opting for the Gorilla Glue.

In a follow-up video posted to her account on Thursday morning, Brown shows herself attempting to wash her hair with shampoo while fighting back tears. So far TikTokkers, Twitter users, and Instagram users are attempting to help give Brown solutions.

The official Gorilla Glue Twitter page even chimed in “Hi there, we are sorry to learn about your experience! We do not recommend using our products in hair as they are considered permanent. You can try soaking the affected area in warm, soapy water or applying rubbing alcohol to the area.”

On Feb. 6, Brown posted photos of herself seeking medical treatment for the glue on her head.

In one image Brown can be seen lying on a hospital bed. The other image shows an emergency room entrance to St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana. The final image to the post is a video of a friend applying a treatment provided by the hospital to Brown’s scalp who clearly appears to be in pain.

Now Brown might be considering a lawsuit according to the New York Post.

According to New York Post “Brown hired an attorney and is weighing litigation against Gorilla Glue, because while the product’s label warns against using on eyes, skin or clothing – it does not mention hair – the outlet reports.”

Gorilla Glue tweeted a statement in response to suggestions of a lawsuit saying “We are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair. We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best.”

In response to Brown’s story, a Gorilla Glue spokesperson told Newsweek in an interview that “We saw the video as well, and we do not recommend using our products in hair, as they are considered permanent” and recommended, “soaking the affected area in warm, soapy water or applying rubbing alcohol to the area.”

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