Fierce

Nike’s N7 Fund Supports Native American Youths And For It’s 10th Anniversary They Designed A Navajo-Inspired Commemorative Collection

Nike’s N7 collection is celebrating 10 years of supporting Native American and aboriginal communities. The iconic sportswear brand teamed up with Pendleton Prints, the American textile company from Portland, Oregon, to create an anniversary collection that features Native American prints and patterns to honor Navajo heritage through design. 

Nike’s N7 Fund is inspired by Native American wisdom of the Seven Generations: in every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the seventh generation.

instagram @mvskokeyouth

The Nike N7 Fund supports organizations that provide sport and physical activity programming to youth in Native American communities. The fund helps them reach their greatest potential through play and sport and creates more equal playing fields for all. Since 2009, the N7 Fund has awarded more than $7.5 million in grants to 259 communities and organizations —and this year, it’s turning 10. 

Tracie Jackson, a graphic designer at Nike, is passing along her grandmother’s legacy in the 10th anniversary of the Nike N7 collection. 

www.nike.com

Upon going blind in old age, Phoebe Nez continued to weave rugs in the Navajo tradition, teaching her young great-granddaughter Tracie Jackson how to take up the craft. The member of the Black Streaked Wood People clan of the Navajo Nation (“Tsi’naajinii”) taught Jackson that every color and shape has a purpose that can be altered by many influences, such as creation stories, the environment and individual experiences. Nez committed her designs to memory, continuing to teach Jackson as her eyesight slowly faded.

Without my great-grandmother, I wouldn’t have learned about my culture, and without my culture, I wouldn’t have been a designer. My family ties are what influence my native identity.” says Jackson.

The collection includes blankets, sneakers, sweatshirts, and t-shirts all containing the storm pattern. 

www.nike.com

This pattern was a favorite of Jackson’s great grandmother and contains meaningful elements like zig-zags that represent lightning and the step patterns signifying the Mesas of Monument Valley in AZ. The pattern is a narrative tapestry of Jackson’s Navajo history, which specializes in designs personal to the individual weaver. Those living in different geographical regions will experience different environments. As the weaver becomes more skilled, he or she creates original designs based on the influences of classic works, personalizing the pieces with different colors and yarns.

Nike’s and Pendleton’s relationship dates back to 2008. 

twitter @stephaniejung

Nike first collaborated with the brand over 10 years ago. The sportswear label released ACG x Pendleton All-Mountain collection in an original print back in 2008. They joined forces again in 2013 on another collaboration, this time creating a tee, a jacket, a couple of sneakers and a commemorative blanket. 

But it wasn’t until 2017 when the two companies created a commemorative blanket for PK80 College Basketball Tournament. 

twitter @espnevents

The 2017 Phil Knight Invitational was a 16 team college basketball event held in Pendleton’s hometown of Portland, Oregon. The tournament was organized to honor Nike’s co-founder Phil Knight’s 80th birthday. 

N7’s 10-year anniversary collection, the design is Navajo-inspired and the storm pattern appears consistently.

The storm pattern appears throughout this year’s collection consistently, which also includes hoodies, leggings, joggers and more. Participating college basketball teams this year, will wear Nike N7 x Pendleton’s long sleeve crew as shooting shirts over their turquoise uniforms. 

Jackson also put her spin on the classic Nike Air Zoom Pegasus. 

www.nike.com

The Pegasus 36 N7 x Pendleton will commemorate the running womanhood ceremony that is customary among Navajo circles. “I’m very hands-on with my design process. A lot of native runners reached out to me asking for an N7 version of the Pegasus shoe. And I want to bring the voices of our community in,” she explained. “As native people, our feet are actually wider and flat, so the Pegasus shoe is the most ideal shoe for our body when it comes to running.”

We love to see this kind of representation done so sensibly, ethically and responsibly by brands as big as Nike. Ideally, more brands would pursue diversity —simply because it’s the right thing to do— to be more tone-aware and in touch with customers from every point of the spectrum. It doesn’t take a lot to realize that a diverse workforce that thrives in an inclusive culture leads to a higher level of innovation and an all-round stronger brand that everyone can relate to —maybe that’s why Nike remains as everyone’s favorite, after years and years. Here’s to seeing more projects like N7 come to fruition. 

Besamé Cosmetics’ Sold-Out ‘Lucille Ball Collection’ Is Officially Coming Back This Fall

Fierce

Besamé Cosmetics’ Sold-Out ‘Lucille Ball Collection’ Is Officially Coming Back This Fall

Archive Photos / Getty

Fans love Lucille Ball so much that when Besamé Cosmetics launched a collection dedicated to her back in June all of its items were sold out within a matter of twelve hours. The collection paid homage to the beauty of the iconic Hollywood comedian who, alongside her husband (Cuban bandleader Desi Arnaz), starred in the television classic “I Love Lucy.”

Now, the souped-up limited-edition Lucy items are back by popular demand.

The launch date? This September.

Lucy fans can pre-order lipstick of the new line on the brand’s website.

“Already, hundreds of orders have come in to pre-order these colors inspired by classic Lucy looks,” a representative from Besamé told Allure about the line which pays homage to the iconic actress’s signature look.

The retro makeup line gives fans a chance to seize up to seven beauty items that are supposed to match the makeup Ball wore in her days of stardom. The Ball collection comes complete with an eye shadow palette, lipstick, a pressed powder compact, and a pencil set for eyes and lips.

Like every Besamé item, the collection’s products are encased in rounded gold. This time, however, they come with a special design that features an original drawing of the actress.

The collection can be purchased as a bundle for $150. Additional gifted items will be included for the whole bunch.

According to Allure, those who purchase the collection will receive “two additional and exclusive products: an I Love Lucy tote bag and a set of false lashes the brand says ‘are based on the exact size, shape, and color that Lucille Ball wore.'”

The Lucille Ball collection is just the first in a new collection by Besamé.

Besamé has stated that they intend on producing an Iconic Women Series featuring iconic figures from history. It’s unknown as of yet who else will be featured on the upcoming products but we’re crossing our fingers for Latina icons like Dolores Huerta, Celia Cruz, and Rita Moreno.

Brazil’s Remote Indigenous Communities Are At Risk Of Covid-19 After Healthcare Workers Test Positive

Things That Matter

Brazil’s Remote Indigenous Communities Are At Risk Of Covid-19 After Healthcare Workers Test Positive

Michael Dantas / Getty Images

The Coronavirus pandemic has been ravaging Brazilian cities for months. In fact, Brazil is number two in the world when it comes to both deaths and infections. Cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo have struggled to carry on as much of the economy and the health care system has collapsed. Many have attributed these dire conditions as consequences of President Bolsonaro’s failed policies.

Now, Brazil’s remote Indigenous communities are facing a similar crisis – although one that could be even worse thanks to a severe lack of access to medical care. A team of medical workers sent to protect the country’s native populations has actually done the opposite – as more than a thousands workers test positive for the virus and have spread it among remote tribes.

For months, as the Coronavirus tore through Brazil, Indigenous tribes across the vast country have tried to protect themselves by strictly limiting access to their villages. Some have setup armed roadblocks and others have hunkered down in isolated camps.

But it appears that all of that may have been in vain. According to interviews and federal data obtained by The New York Times, the health workers charged by the federal government with protecting the country’s Indigenous populations may be responsible for spreading the disease in several Indigenous communities. More than 1,000 workers with the federal Indigenous health service, known as Sesai, have tested positive for Coronavirus as of early July.

As news of the infections spread across the villages, communities became alarmed. “Many people grabbed some clothes, a hammock and ran into the forest to hide,” said Thoda Kanamari, a leader of the union of Indigenous peoples in the vast territory, home to groups with little contact with the outside world. “But it was too late, everyone was already infected.”

Health workers say they have been plagued by insufficient testing and protective gear. Working without protective equipment or access to enough tests, these workers may have inadvertently endangered the very communities they were trying to help.

Now, news of the region’s first deaths linked to the virus have started to emerge and there’s fear it will get much worse.

Credit: Tarso Sarraf / Getty Images

The remote villages that dot the Amazon region have also started to report their very first deaths linked to Coronavirus. Despite raging out of control in Brazil’s cities, remote Indigenous villages have faired quite well. That’s all beginning to change.

The Amazon region, which Brazil’s government says is home to greatest concentration of isolated Indigenous groups in the world, is now seeing an outbreak of Covid-19 – one that many fear will be hard to stop. Experts fear the new coronavirus could spread rapidly among people with less resistance even to already common diseases and limited access to health care, potentially wiping out some smaller groups.

So far, more than 15,500 Indigenous Brazilians have been diagnosed with the Coronavirus, including at least 10,889 living in protected territories, according to Instituto Socioambiental, an Indigenous rights organization. At least 523 have died.

The alarming news comes as Brazil continues to struggle in its response to the pandemic.

Credit: Michael Dantas / Getty Images

With nearly 2.1 million confirmed cases and more than 80,000 deaths, as of July 22, Brazil’s Covid-19 catastrophe is the world’s second worst, after the United States.

And now an illness that has ravaged major cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo is at risk of spreading unchecked in some of the county’s most vulnerable communities. Health care workers, Indigenous leaders and experts blame major shortcomings that have turned Brazil into a global epicenter of the pandemic.

Robson Santos da Silva, the Army colonel at the head of Sesai, defended the agency’s response during the pandemic, and brushed off criticism as “a lot of disinformation, a lot of politics.”

Complicating the outbreak in Brazil’s remote villages (and even in the large cities) is that tests have been in short supply and often unreliable, which means some doctors and nurses with asymptomatic or undiagnosed cases have traveled to vulnerable communities and worked in them for days.

Criticism of President Jair Bolsonaro’s handling of the pandemic, within Indigenous territories and beyond, is mounting.

Brazil has largely struggled to contain the pandemic thanks to the policies of its populist right-wing president who has denounced the pandemic as nothing more than a “little flu.” Within a couple of months of the initial outbreak, Bolsonaro lost two health ministers – who were physicians – and replaced them with an Army general who has no experience in health care.

And the backlash to Bolsonaro’s failed policies seems to be growing. Early this month, a judge on Brazil’s Supreme Court ordered the government to redouble efforts to shield Indigenous people from the virus by coming up with a comprehensive plan within 30 days and setting up a “situation room” staffed by officials and Indigenous representatives.

More recently, another Supreme Court judge generated consternation in the Bolsonaro administration by warning that the armed forces could be held responsible for a “genocide” over their handling of the pandemic in Indigenous communities.