Fierce

Nancy Kerrigan The Ice Skating Victim Behind That Tonya Harding Attack Was Apparently Obsessed With Selena This Whole Time As Much As We Are

smileselenaquintanilla | Rebloggy / Instagram, @badpostmargots / Twitter

As much as Latinos love to claim Selena Quintanilla as their own, there’s no denying the fact that she and her music were loved by people of all kinds. Kim Kardashian-West, Drake, and one of the world’s most famed ice-skaters included.

The world knows a lot about Nancy Kerrigan. The American actress and former figure skater won bronze medals at the 1992 Winter Olympics, and a silver at the 1994 Winter Olympics and was entered into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 2004. Her name, however, has become more commonly associated with an incident that netted international attention in 1994 when she was famously attacked by with police baton by two men hired by her rival Tonya Hardin. In 2017, “I, Tonya” depicted the attack and gave us quite a bit of information about the skater and who she is.

Still, for all of the quick facts the world knows about her old clips of her skating to Selena is by far the best.

In 1997, Kerrigan debuted her routine for Selena’s version of ‘A Boy Like That’

For 1997 Battle of the Sexes, Kerrigan and other women were pitted against men. Each skater performed two routines during the television event broadcasted by FOX. During the flawless routine, Nancy Kerrigan chose to skate to Selena’s “A Boy Like That.”

The song, which was recorded by Selena for the various-artists compilation The Songs of West Side Story album, which created at the time for the benefit for AIDS Project Los Angeles. Its original creation was for the 1957 Broadway musical “West Side Story,” and was written by Leonard Bernstein Stephen Sondheim.

But that wasn’t the only Selena song Kerrigan performed.

A year later in Germany, she played Selena’s 1989 hit “Where Did The Feeling Go”

The track was recorded 1989 by Selena and she sang the song at the Tejano Music Awards in 1991, and at a concert in San Antonio.

Of course the comment sections of both videos are filled with love for the performances.

“What a great song. RIP SELENA QUINTANILLA,” one user wrote in the comments section of the page.

“Amazing I did not know Nancy skated to Selena!” wrote another.

“Love Nancy and I love Selena! Never knew she skated to this song. ❤️💕 Te Quiero Mucho, Nancy y Selena”

Suzette Quintanilla Tried Distancing Herself From A Man Who Revitalized A Selena Mural But He Had The Receipts

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Suzette Quintanilla Tried Distancing Herself From A Man Who Revitalized A Selena Mural But He Had The Receipts

Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

If you’re paying attention to all things Quintanilla, you know that the family is fiercely protective over the late Selena’s image and trademark. That fight has recently erupted over Eric Lee Tunchez’s promotion and revamping of the Molina Selena mural. Tunchez is the founder of non-profit Stop Bullying Inc. and planned to pass out backpacks and school supplies at the event. The Quintanilla’s legal team sent a cease and desist letter to Stop Bullying Inc. accusing the organization of ‘unauthorized and unlawful marketing and promotion’ of the Selena themed Fiesta de Selena Mural.

The whole ordeal has boiled down to a he-said, she-said, but Tunchez has recently responded with screenshots of the email from Suzette, and now the Internet is outraged.

On July 31, 2018, Tunchez posted to Facebook that he got “blessings” from “Selena Quintanilla’s father, Abraham, to re-do the neighborhood mural on Elvira and Bloomington.”

Credit: Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

It seems as if Tunchez has been earnest in his year-long effort to unveil this mural for his community. In a Facebook post, Tunchez wrote, “I would like to share with everyone that I have been working hard to revitalize my old neighborhood Molina. Today, I got the blessings from the store owner of the Times Market and Selena Quintanilla’s father, Abraham, to re-do the neighborhood mural on Elvira and Bloomington.”

The day before the event, August 2nd, Tunchez was promoting the event as expected.

Credit: Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

“With the Quintanilla family collaboration and my passion to carry on the Selena mural tradition in the Molina neighborhood, the revitalized memorial will influence Latinos for generations to come,” Tunchez posted. He consistently has thanked and credited the Quintanilla family for the cooperation.

Then, the day of the event, Tunchez told folks that he “received a love letter (cease and desist letter) by the estate of the Selena Quintanilla.”

Credit: Selena Mural in Corpus Christi‎ / Facebook

“I understand, respect, and agree that people should not profit from Selena. It is very important to keep Selena clean,” Tunchez posted. “I’ve been inspired and she is a local icon and I in no way want to disrespect the family of Selena. My intent for today’s event is benign and is for the community of the Molina neighborhood.”

Then, he blamed “the corporate powers” that “want to stop today’s event, which I planned to hand out backpacks to disadvantaged families.”

Credit: Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

“Today, I received a love letter (cease and desist letter) by the estate of the Selena Quintanilla,” he continued. “We may need to go through a legal battle to compromise something for the community in which where this mural stands.”

Abraham Quintanilla told the Caller-Times that Tunchez did reach out about a year and a half ago about updating the mural, but “never collected money for the project.” The Quintanilla family then hired New York artist San Sigüenza to do the work. Tunchez “didn’t pay one penny … and is taking credit for everything,” Abraham said. 

Then, Suzette went on public television to denounce any contact she may have had with Tunchez.

Credit: @santinyc / Instagram

Tunchez tried to clear his name on Facebook with a rebuttal post. “Suzette Quintanilla went to public television and said she had no association with me in regard to the mural. She reached out to me about my project. I didn’t ask them for anything.”

Tunchez went on to say that “they want the credit for my efforts and work to revitalize the Molina. I think that is pure greed. I still hope we can compromise to keep this event at the Selena mural every year to promote education and give out school supplies. My energy and motivation will propel me to continue to create something that will last forever because my neighborhood would not like to take down this mural that inspires many generations of Tejanos.”

Buckle up, because Suzette released all hell and fury at Tunchez on her own Facebook platform.

Credit: Suzette Quintanilla / Facebook

This is getting heated. “Now lets talk facts,” Suzette’s post continues. “FACT: This Mural was for the Molina Neighborhood, NOT to help promote anything you do sir. Never has been about you making money, its about you trying to use this mural for self glorification and wanting to use the Selena Trademark name and likeness to promote yourself. Our local newspaper failed to add the rest of the wording for the cease and Desist letter… AND /OR PROMOTE AND EVENT. thats a really important part. last thing I wanna share with everyone is my family and I have protect what is ours from day one and will continue to do so. This legacy Selena has left behind for all future generations is due to all of my family, we were a team. We created music from day one together since Sel was 9, I was 13 and AB 17. So we have all rights to do what we want what is ours.”

Tunchez then posted some receipts backing up his claim.

Credit: Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

Within hours of her Facebook post, Tunchez kept it simple. “Hey Suzette Quintanilla,” he writes. “The fact is your father gave me the blessing to find an artist to re-do a mural that was neglected. The fact is I wanted to make things better for my neighborhood Molina. The fact is Sandra Gonzalez was going to do the mural with West Oso art students. Fact is you denied that opportunity for our community and went with your artist San Siguenza from New York. The fact is we can take down the current mural in Molina and give our community the opportunity to do so still. I will leave that up to my community.”

He then included attachments of the email where he claims she “reached out… so please do not call me a liar. I’ve been really nice to you and you have been real mean to me. I don’t need your money. Let me know.”

People have opinions about all of this.

Credit: Eric Lee Tunchez / Facebook

Jesse Lino Villareal commented, “At the end of the day this was sopose to be a community thing and it has blown up to an Quintanilla thing…..this is about the Westside Molina not them folks….Selena was apart of this neighborhood he just wanted to honor her by helping revitalizing the mural……at the end of the day this is about the community not them other folks”

When someone replied with some legal facts like they can sue because they “own Selena rights,” someone else responds in all caps, “NO ONE OWNS A FOLK HERO LIKE SELENA. NO ONE.”

READ: Dying Over This OTT Selena-Themed Birthday Party That Had Yolanda Saldivar Present

Julián Castro Walked Onstage To Selena, Struggles With Spanish, And Other Ways He Lives The Latino Experience On The Campaign Trail

Entertainment

Julián Castro Walked Onstage To Selena, Struggles With Spanish, And Other Ways He Lives The Latino Experience On The Campaign Trail

juliancastrotx / seleqofficial / Instagram

Last week, the 2020 presidential election officially kicked off with the Democratic debate featuring ten politicians — and another ten the following night. It’s a bit subjective to say who came out on top as the clear winner because there were definitely a couple of them. Sen. Elizabeth Warren was good, as was Sen. Kamala Harris — but without a doubt, there was one breakthrough star.

Less than a week after Julián Castro delivered a commanding performance at the debates in Miami, yesterday he returned to Texas and walked onstage to Selena’s “Baila Esta Cumbia.”

Credit: @SawyerHackett / Twitter

The former San Antonio mayor and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (under Obama), was in Texas over the weekend and made some critical stops including visiting a detention center. He also spoke to potential voters at St. John’s church in Houston.

This is not the first time Castro has played Selena during a campaign stop. He began this tradition since day one of his candidacy for president.

Credit: @cristela9 / Twitter

We love that he’s a fan of Selena! Honestly, it would be more surprising if he wasn’t since he is from Texas, the homeland of the queen of Tejano music. It just makes sense that Selena would be a part of his campaign since she is so important to his home state.

Castro and Selena have a lot in common so it makes sense that the presidential hopeful would play her music.

Credit: @KasieDC / Twitter

Yes, they’re both from Texas and are of Mexican descent. Most importantly, they represent a future of their times. Selena gave Latinos a mainstream representation in music they had never seen before. Castro is offering a future that young Latinos want and deserve.

Selena and Castro were not brought up speaking Spanish in their house.

Credit: @shoshochristine / Twitter

Castro’s speech in San Antonio included several talking points that he made during the debates including that undocumented immigrants should have the right to health care, dealing with climate change, and women’s rights.

“People coming to this country in these ways are desperate. I don’t believe in criminalizing desperation,” he said about immigration reform.

He also added that his first task as president would be to deal with undoing Trump’s mess. “My first executive order as POTUS will be to recommit the United States to the Paris Agreement.”

Like Selena, and many other Latinos, Castro admits that his Spanish needs work because of the need to assimilate.

“I guess the best place to start is to say that there are Latinos who have lived here for generations,” he said. “My grandmother that I grew up with got here almost 100 years ago in 1922. In my grandparents time, in my mom’s time, Spanish was looked down upon. You were punished in school if you spoke Spanish. You were not allowed to speak it. People, I think, internalized this oppression about it, and basically wanted their kids to first be able to speak English. And I think that in my family, like a lot of other families, that the residue of that, the impact of that is that there are many folks whose Spanish is not that great.”

Check out the video below to watch Castro’s Selena entrance.

Honestly, this is the kind of entrance we want more politicians to take part in. Who doesn’t like a Selena jam to listen to?

READ: Julián Castro Did Not Hold Back When Democrats Debated Immigration During The First Debate

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