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She Came To The U.S. With Only $1,000 And A Dream For Her Daughter, Decades Later They’re Both Graduating College Together

Graduation season is well on its way and once again, Latinas are stepping up to the stage to prove once again that great success can be achieved by anyone who puts the work in. From ones embracing their parents’ immigration stories to others celebrating their parents for their own hard work, there’s no doubt Latinas know how vital their parents are to motivating them to reach for brighter, more informed futures. Recently, one Latina grad crossed the stage towards a future twice as radiant and positive then she might have guessed 12 years ago.

A mom and daughter both graduated from the William Paterson University in New Jersey.

The duo — Sandra Murillo a 46-year-old single mom to Katherinn Lopez-Murillo, 25 — graduated in 2019 class with degrees in public health and criminology, respectively.

Sandra first came to the U.S. from Colombia in 1996 but had to leave her then 2-year-old daughter, Katherinn, behind due to a custody battle.

Sandra said she arrived in the U.S. with $1,000, a suitcase, and didn’t know anyone.

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“I just came here with hope that life would be easier…I never thought that coming here, I’d encounter so many challenges,” Sandra said to her university publication. “I was so alone, and I was so discouraged, and I felt like it was going to take me 20 years to graduate.”

In 2006, when Katherinn was 12-years-old, she was finally able to join her mom in the U.S.

Her mom instilled in her from day one that education would be her key to success.

“Unless I was sick, or something terrible was happening, I was going to school,” Katherinn told NBC News. “She told me if you don’t educate yourself, life is going to be so much harder for you.”

Both women enrolled at the school and now plan to relocate to Florida for new job opportunities.

“People like us,” Sandra said to her school publication about the struggles of immigrants, “we need to study, or we’ll never get ahead in life. We women especially, we have to be empowered. If you have money and no needs, you probably won’t want to go to school as an adult while working full time, because it’s hard; it’s very hard. But when you want to do it, and when you come to the end – when you finish and accomplish that goal – you have no idea how it feels. “I am so grateful. I thank God every day for giving me the strength, and for giving me this wonderful daughter who was there with me through the hard times, and for making this more special because she’s graduating with me.”

Can someone please make a movie about them?

ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

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ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is reportedly planning a raid in the early morning hours on Sunday in 10 cities.

It is being reported that the raids will target more than 2,000 families in cities with large migrant populations including Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, and Houston, according to officials who remain anonymous.

Trump tweeted on Monday that ICE would begin deporting millions of undocumented immigrants throughout the U.S.

More than “1 million” undocumented immigrants “have been issued final deportation orders by federal judges yet remain at large in the country” and called enforcing those judicial orders a “top priority” for ICE, a senior administration official told CNN.

They are allegedly planning to use hotel rooms to house everyone until the family can be deported together and say they might even arrest individuals that can’t be deported immediately. They will most likely be released with ankle monitors, in cases such as parents whose children are U.S. citizens.

Miami is reportedly one of the first cities that’ll be raided, according to the Miami Herald, and the other cities are Atlanta, Baltimore, Denver, New Orleans, New York City, and San Francisco.

Those who will allegedly be targeted include minors who came into the U.S. without their parents and have since turned 18; people who were ordered removed in absentia; and people who missed a court hearing and failed to respond to letters from the Department of Justice (DOJ). Additionally, families on the “rocket docket,” a set of deportation cases fast-tracked for by the DOJ.

There are around 52,000 single adults in ICE custody overall, mostly those who came from the border, according to CNN.

Many are saying Trump’s push for deportations, including essentially outing the raid, are part of his reelection bid due to his poor record.

The inhumane treatment of immigrants in detention centers has been well documented, with a spread of illness leading to many unnecessary deaths, including those of children.

Recently the American Civil Liberties Union  ACLU shared on Instagram what people can do if ICE comes knocking on their door.

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What to do if ICE agents are at your door. #KnowYourRights

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They advise not to open the door unless they have a warrant signed by a judge since ICE administrative warrant does not give them permission to enter a home.

The ACLU website also has an entire section dedicated to immigrants’ rights with several resources for dealing with ICE, border patrol, and the police.

In response to raid that occurred in Ohio a little more than a year ago, HOLA Ohio founder Veronica Isabel Dahlberg wrote in a blog on the ACLU site:

“Regardless of citizenship status, for workers — including teenagers, mothers, fathers, and those with medical issues — to be treated like enemy insurgents is beyond disturbing. It is terrible, barbaric, and inhumane.”

READ: Daughter Sues ICE After They Denied Father Cirrhosis And Diabetes Medication While In Detention Resulting In His Death

New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

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New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

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Mexicans no longer make up the overall majority of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States. According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, the number of Mexicans leaving the U.S. is more than there are coming here which is a significant change from the early 2000s. These new numbers show the changing landscape of immigration in the U.S. within the last decade where there are fewer immigrants arriving. This trend shows those who have been in the U.S. for longer are now by far the majority of immigrants as a whole.

The immigrant population in the U.S., which has its smallest unauthorized immigrant population in more than a decade, is shifting quickly.

Credit: Pew Research Center

Since 2010, migration from Mexico into the U.S. has been slowly decreasing as data shows more Mexicans have moved south across the border than the north. According to the Pew Research Center, between 2007 and 2017, about two million of the Mexican immigrants who left the U.S. had been living in the country undocumented, 6.9 to 4.9 respectively.

This shift has contributed to an overall decline in the undocumented immigrant population which has gone down from a peak of 12.2 million in 2007 to a low of 10.5 million in 2017.

There has also been an uptick in the length of time most undocumented immigrants have been in the county. The typical undocumented immigrant had lived 15 years in the United States in 2017, which is up from seven years in 1995. It’s the highest number of years since Pew started tracking that data.

While the number of immigrants from Mexico has gone down, Central Americans are coming at unprecedented rates.

Credit: Pew Research Center

There’s been a surge of migrants from Central American countries, like Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras that have arrived in the U.S. within the last few years. From 1.5 million in 2007 to 1.9 million in 2017, Central Americans represent one of the biggest increases in the overall immigrant population.

Though many Central Americans are crossing the border illegally, they’re requesting asylum, which means a much longer process and stay for many.
Even with the recent surge of families from Central America seeking asylum at the southern border, apprehensions remain far below the peak number of about 1.6 million in 2000.

Research has also found that long term residents outnumber more recent arrivals. Undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. have become more settled into their communities. In 2010, about 50 percent of the nation’s undocumented immigrants had lived in the country for more than 10 years. In 2017, that number rose to 66 percent.

Following Central America, the immigrant population of people from Asia has also risen to 1.4 million. The share of both legal and unauthorized immigrants from Asian nations has also continued to spike.

What do these numbers mean in terms of tracking and foreseeing future immigration trends moving forward?

Credit: Pew Research Center

The latest data is a reflection of the various global and domestic changes that have made noticeable differences in immigration trends. Several factors include the U.S government investing more heavily in border security which had made illegal border crossings harder. In 1994, the U.S. had fewer than 5,000 Border Patrol agents but today that number is nearly 20,000. Stopping the rising inflow of unauthorized immigrants has been one of the key issues for the Trump administration.

The Mexican economy has also improved, resulting in more Mexicans to stay in their country and more Mexicans living in the U.S. to return back. Many of the migration trends that were seen in the last 20 years have changed and Mexicans are one of those changing demographics.

Data shows that the second wave of illegal immigration isn’t coming from those in other countries but rather those already here overstaying visas.
More than 600,000 foreign travelers who legally entered the U.S in 2017 overstayed their visas and remained here by the end of the year, according to recent Department of Homeland Security data.

“The decline in unauthorized immigrants from Mexico and rise from other parts of the world is one sign of a change in how recent arrivals to this population enter the country,” the researchers wrote. “A growing share of U.S. unauthorized immigrants do not cross the border illegally, but probably arrive with legal visas and overstay their required departure date.”

READ: Ahead Of Supreme Court Decision, Census Bureau Quietly Seeks Citizenship Data

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