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Michelle Obama Told Parents To Stop Babying Their Sons And Latinas Blew Up Twitter With A Whole Lot of “YAS”

Michelle Obama has always been a woman who keeps it real, particularly when it comes to the sexism women experience on a daily basis. In a conversation at the Obama Foundation’s Inaugural Summit, Obama dropped some knowledge on how families often inadvertently raise entitled boys and men. In a conversation she held alongside poet Elizabeth Alexander, Obama hit families with some hard questions about their role in creating toxic masculinity, and Latinas were totally there for it.

During the summit, Obama asked families to look at the way they raise their sons, and recognize how that contributes to a world where men and women are not treated as equals.

@michelleobama / Instagram

The former First Lady pointed out that when families raise their sons and daughters differently, they ultimately end up rearing boys who turn into men that inherently believe they deserve special treatment and exploit others.

“I think we pay for that a little bit and that’s a ‘we’ thing because we are raising them. And it’s powerful to have strong men but what does that strength mean?” she asked. “Does it mean respect? Does it mean responsibility? Does it mean compassion? Or are we protecting our men too much, so they feel a little entitled?”

And for the most part, Latina Twitter responded with a resounding…

E! News / Giphy.com

Because the truth is, Obama’s words ring very true for Latinas living in a household where machismo remains strong.

In fact, a lot of women were quick to show just how close her words hit home.

@Thelifeofsofiam / Twitter.com

Many of us can vividly remember having to cook for and pick up after our brothers and fathers while they lounged around the house and watched TV.

Some of the responses called out the way girls and boys are expected to grow up at very different rates.

This is so real and relatable, because we all have the brother or primo who STILL has no clue about how to turn on the dishwasher. And he’s 35.

Even this guy had something to say about it.

@p00fter/ Twitter.com

At 40, you damn well know how to cook and clean for yourself. You just choose not to, and Latina moms often enable the behavior.

This woman’s insightful tweet summed up how us ladies end up having to put up with machismo culture in the long term.

@Anu_Malik16 / Twitter.com

So true.

Michelle Obama’s speech spoke the experience of every Latina girl mopping floors and scrubbing toilets while her brother got to chill and play video games.

Any time she wants to hit back at machismo culture, we will totally be here for it. Because YAS, Michelle, YAS!


Read: Every Year For Nochebuena, My Twin Brother Gets To Go Golfing While I’m Forced To Play Cinderella And Help Make The Lechon, Here’s Why

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

Jerod Harris / Getty

Machismo.

If you haven’t experienced it, you’ve definitely seen it. Most Latinas have watched it take form beneath the roof of their very own family homes and have experienced it first hand. From being glaringly aware of how much less time their brothers and papas spend in the kitchen to constantly being told to play less aggressively than the boys, most girls see it at a young age.

The children of celebrities are apparently no different.

Speaking about experiencing double standards in her own household, while growing up with her brother Jaden, Willow Smith got real on the Red Table Talk.

On this week’s Red Table Talk, Willow opened up about experiencing machismo with her mother, Jada Pinkett Smith and her grandmother Adrienne Banfield Norris.

“There is a difference between how Black moms treat their daughters and their sons,” Willow said in a clip. Willow went onto share that in her own experience it extended to “something as simple as getting up at the right time” where her mother would hurry her out of the house before school, Meanwhile Jaden was given more leniency.

“It was like, ‘You better get up. You better get dressed.’ I’d be in my room going like, ‘OK, I gotta get…,'” Willow says while acting stressed and hurried. “But then Jaden is there and she’d be like, ‘Uh, so are you ready to uh…’ and he’d be like, ‘Uh, maybe one moment.'”

Willow spoke about how machismo affected her while she would be “ready at the door” for school. While mimicking Jaden’s pace, and noting how slow he was going, Willow explained that he would be “getting his shoes on” with a lot less urgency.

“That’s true,” Jade laughed, “She might have a point. Because I was like she better be on it. You? Nah.”

Likely, Pinkett’s comment refers to her desire to see her daughter pay more attention and work harder in school.

“For me, I knew that she’s gonna have it twice as hard,” the “Girls Trip” star said. “I needed you to be strong because I know what this world is like for us as Black women… My fear for having a Black daughter and what I felt like she needed to be in this world put me in a position to be a little harder on her.”

And in ways, Pinkett’s reasoning comes from a place of well-meaning. After all, a study from The State of Black Women in Corporate America 2020  found that African-American women are repressed beyond belief in the United States underlining that Black women “who seek promotions at the same rate as white men, are only 58 percent as likely to be promoted to a managerial position and only 64 percent as likely to be hired into such positions. At a disadvantage from the beginning of their careers, Black women see the representation gap continue to widen and end up accounting for only 1.6 percent of vice presidents and 1.4 percent of C-suite executives, while white men hold 57 percent and 68 percent of those positions.”

Red Table Talk airs this Tuesdays at 9 a.m. PT/12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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Black Women Know Exactly Why Kamala Harris Had To Hold Back In the Debate Last Night

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Black Women Know Exactly Why Kamala Harris Had To Hold Back In the Debate Last Night

Photo: via Getty Images

Kamala Harris’s debate performance on Wednesday night was admirable on so many fronts. She had done her research and was prepared with talking points and answers. She was calm and measured, a constant smile on her face. She never raised her voice.

In essence, her demeanor was the exact opposite of President Donald Trump’s at the presidential debate the week before. Trump had been veritably unhinged–yelling, ranting, insulting, and constantly interrupting former Vice President Joe Biden.

But Kamala Harris did make headlines for a statement she made, possibly her most assertive statement of the night: “Mr. Vice President,” she said after being talked over by Vice President Pence yet again. “I’m speaking.”

“I’m speaking” swiftly went viral on social media, quickly being meme-ified and retweeted by her supporters.

But not everyone loved that Harris had the dignity to assert herself. When speaking with Fox News about what he thought of the Vice Presidential debate, President Donald Trump called Harris a “monster” and pronounced her as “totally unlikable.” For Black women around the world, the insults Trump lobbed at Harris were seen for the dog whistles that they were.

Harris and every other Black woman in America is deeply familiar with the pervasive racial stereotype of the “Angry Black Woman”. The “Angry Black Woman” is a bitter and emotional woman who has let the circumstances of her life carve out a chip on her shoulder. And the media is quick to peddle this narrative.

Look no farther than the public flaying of Michelle Obama during the early days of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. The negative headlines about Michelle ranged from “Michelle Obama Hates America” to “Just Say No to Mrs. Obama“. And the vitriol aimed at her on social media was especially vile.

The former First Lady spoke candidly about the media’s unfair treatment of her while promoting her memoir “Becoming” at the 2019 Essence Festival.

“People from all sides, Democrats and Republicans, tried to take me out by the knees,” Obama told host, Gayle King. “And the best way they could do it was to focus on the strength of the Black woman, so they turned that into a caricature. For a minute there, I was an angry Black woman who was emasculating her husband.”

But the effects of misogynoir–which is defined as the specific hatred, dislike, distrust, and prejudice directed toward Black women–are not limited to public figures. They are ubiquitous.

Even I, a Black woman who is not at all in the public eye, experience misogynoir constantly.

Recently, I was lamenting to my brother over the fact that I am perpetually single. During our conversation, I was brainstorming possible reasons as to why no man wanted to commit to me. “From my perspective,” my brother (who is also Black) told me, “you’re too loud.” He continued: “It’s intimidating. If I were a guy, that would scare me right off.”

His comments stung.

I called a girlfriend later, my heart hurting, my feelings of undesirability and unfemininity coupled with that all-too-familiar feeling of shame that comes with simply existing as a Black woman on the planet–and especially as a Black woman in white spaces. But I was unable to articulate the uneasiness I felt at his comments. “I can’t help who I am,” I said to her.

“It’s a double standard,” she responded. “Our friend Jocelyn is just as loud as you are–ask anyone. But no one would ever tell her that her loudness is a negative trait, or something that she should change about herself in order to land a man. But Jocelyn is white.”

I felt the burden of my identity like a bag of bricks in that moment. I knew that whatever I used to shield myself from misogynoir–a good job, a college education, fancy clothes and makeup–none of it would ever fully shield me from the racism and sexism I would face for the rest of my life.

Kamala Harris’s debate performance was measured and grounded because she knew she had to package herself to be palatable to white America.

After all, Harris already recently faced some media backlash over what critics called her unfair treatment of (now running mate, then-rival) Joe Biden at the Democratic Primary Debate. Now, it seems, Harris has changed tactics.

Kamala Harris doesn’t have the luxury of being loud or combative or angry–all feelings that would otherwise be completely justified in today’s political climate. Instead, in order to be taken seriously as a Vice Presidential candidate, she must devote a significant amount of her time and energy to being likeable. Trustworthy. Ladylike.

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