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Afro-Mexicans Will Hopefully Soon Be Included In Mexico’s Constitution

Every country has vulnerable communities. These marginalized groups are not just underrepresented in mainstream society; they are also discriminated against and disregarded. In the U.S., neglected groups include Native Americans, low-income minorities, and undocumented people. In Mexico, they too discriminate against certain groups — and it’s not just indigenous Mexicans but a community that is rarely spoken about.

For the past 500 years, Afro-Mexicans have been omitted from Mexico’s history, governmental rights, and society — but that is finally changing.

While Afro-Latinos have been a part of Mexico’s history for centuries, the community hasn’t been properly acknowledged in society or within government rights.

As the Huffington Post notes, since Mexico’s Revolution in 1910, the country has only acknowledged the mixed race between the Spanish and indigenous communities. That group is called “mestizaje,” yet another group was never considered, those of African descent with Mexican roots.

In 2015, thanks to Afro-Mexican activists, 1.38 million Afro-Mexicans living in Mexico began being recognized by the government at least when it came to the census.

Facebook/@MexicoNegroAc

Mexico Negro, an organization that supports Afro-Mexicans, campaigned in 2015 for their inclusion in Mexico’s census and were victorious. But just imagine what it would be like to live in country where you had no box to check with it came to identity.

Now, there’s even more positive change. Mexico’s Senate voted to include Afro-Mexicans in the country’s constitution.

“Four centuries later, we are finally recognizing that we are here, we were born here and we’ve always been here,” Gina Diédhiou, told Remezcla. She witnessed the Senators passing the historic proposal. “We were in tears because there was something special about seeing 122 people vote yes, not one person said no.”

The next step to get this motion finally approved and solidified in the constitution is for the Mexican Congress to vote on it.

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