Fierce

Afro-Mexicans Will Hopefully Soon Be Included In Mexico’s Constitution

Every country has vulnerable communities. These marginalized groups are not just underrepresented in mainstream society; they are also discriminated against and disregarded. In the U.S., neglected groups include Native Americans, low-income minorities, and undocumented people. In Mexico, they too discriminate against certain groups — and it’s not just indigenous Mexicans but a community that is rarely spoken about.

For the past 500 years, Afro-Mexicans have been omitted from Mexico’s history, governmental rights, and society — but that is finally changing.

While Afro-Latinos have been a part of Mexico’s history for centuries, the community hasn’t been properly acknowledged in society or within government rights.

As the Huffington Post notes, since Mexico’s Revolution in 1910, the country has only acknowledged the mixed race between the Spanish and indigenous communities. That group is called “mestizaje,” yet another group was never considered, those of African descent with Mexican roots.

In 2015, thanks to Afro-Mexican activists, 1.38 million Afro-Mexicans living in Mexico began being recognized by the government at least when it came to the census.

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Mexico Negro, an organization that supports Afro-Mexicans, campaigned in 2015 for their inclusion in Mexico’s census and were victorious. But just imagine what it would be like to live in country where you had no box to check with it came to identity.

Now, there’s even more positive change. Mexico’s Senate voted to include Afro-Mexicans in the country’s constitution.

“Four centuries later, we are finally recognizing that we are here, we were born here and we’ve always been here,” Gina Diédhiou, told Remezcla. She witnessed the Senators passing the historic proposal. “We were in tears because there was something special about seeing 122 people vote yes, not one person said no.”

The next step to get this motion finally approved and solidified in the constitution is for the Mexican Congress to vote on it.

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Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

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Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Things That Matter

Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Residents of one Mexican city have taken to the streets to demand justice for a local stray dog who was brutally killed in an axe attack last month. Video of the incident was uploaded to social media and quickly went viral, leading to large protests in the Sinaloan city of Los Mochis.

Hundreds marched in Los Mochis to seek justice for a dog killed by man with an axe.

Hundreds took to the streets in Los Mochis, Sinaloa to demand justice for Rodolfo, a mixed breed dog killed with an axe on March 21. They showed banners that read “Justice for Rodolfo & for all who have no voice,” “We won’t stop until we have justice,” and “Justice for Rodolfo,” among others.

Despite the COVID-19 regulations, the participants in this new march, children, women and men, calmly marched through the center of the city of Los Mochis to make it clear that they are against animal cruelty and demanded justice for Rodolfo, who was a local stray dog. The demonstration gained traction after a video of the attack on Rodolfo, also known by Heart, Pirate and Shorty, was uploaded onto social media.

The predominantly young crowd marched to the state prosecutor’s office where environmental activist Arturo Islas Allende delivered a criminal complaint. Many brought their pets to the march and carried placards demanding the killer be sentenced to prison. One placard read: “Justice for Rodolfo and for all those that don’t have a voice.”

The suspected attacker, José “M,” a student at a Sinaloa university, has already delivered a preparatory statement to officials. Islas Allende questioned the morality of the killer. “We don’t want a psychopath like him as our neighbor,” he said.

The suspect’s girlfriend claimed that he killed the dog to protect her.

The girlfriend of the alleged attacker took to social media in his defense, saying the dog had attacked her days earlier and injured her face and hands.

On her Facebook account she claimed that medical treatments for her injuries had cost 8,000 pesos (US $400) and uploaded photographs of the injuries caused by the dog’s bites.

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