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All Of The Makeup Advice You’ll Need To Refine Your Skills In Time For The Quarantine Finale

Updated May 18, 2020.

There are two kinds of people in the world: makeup aficionados and makeup influencers. As much as we’d like to be makeup pros, we cannot all be makeup experts, there’s just no way, and we have proof! On YouTube alone, there are countless of people that are doing makeup tutorials all wrong. Yes, they are hilarious to watch, but what’s the point of watching a makeup tutorial if it’s a complete disaster? Perhaps if we pay more attention to real makeup pros and follow their advice, we can perhaps teach others to do it, someday maybe. 

Here’s a couple of lessons that we should all be following:

Stop using the wrong foundation.

Credit: YouTube

One of the biggest mistakes people make is choosing a color foundation that doesn’t actually match their skin tone. You can tell when people do this because their face is a different color than their neck. People also have a mask-like foundation and forget to blend it throughout their face, hairline, and neck.

“Stop using the wrong foundation color,” Jamie Greenberg said in an interview with Byrdie. “A lot of people tend to match their skin to their neck, but your neck may be lighter and your chest darker, so I say match your skin to your chest and then bring the foundation down so you’re all one color.”

Don’t smile when you’re applying blush.

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People often think they have to extend their face when applying blush by smiling, but this is all wrong because you’re not smiling the entire day. “Stop smiling when you put blush on — it will make it sit lower on your face. Always apply to a rested face,” Carlie Quinn said to BuzzFeed.

Apply makeup in proper lighting.

Credit: Unsplash

“Don’t do your makeup in bad lighting!” Greenberg said in Allure. If you’re lighting is off, your makeup will be too. If it’s too dark, you will definitely walk out with too much makeup, and the wrong tones too. If there’s too much light, you risk not wearing enough. It’s all about balance.

Before you apply any makeup to your skin, make sure your skin is properly ready.

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By properly ready we mean, not just clean but prepared for makeup.

“If you’re not prepping your skin with moisturizer or primer before you apply your foundation, you’re basically inviting your makeup to invade your pores and get comfortable enough to dry it out and cause breakouts,” Cosmo recommends. “Moisturizer and primer help your skin stay hydrated, smooth out the texture, and keep your foundation from settling into creases.”

Brushes vs. fingers

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The brush industry is making billions in sales selling every kind of brush including five different brushes for your eyebrows, three other ones for your cheeks, and God knows how many more for applying loose foundation. The problem is that you’re probably not washing your brushes enough, so you’re just adding bacteria to your face. Makeup experts suggest using your fingers to apply foundation, eyeshadow, blush, even lipstick. Your fingertips are a lot more gentle than your hand is when you’re using them forcefully with brushes or sponges.

Be easy with the lip liner and the gloss.

Credit: Unsplash

While all might want Kylie Jenner lips (without the fillers), going crazy with the gloss or applying a harsh lip liner won’t do your lips any justice. “When holding the lip taut it can create a tight, unnatural shape,” Buxom’s Education Manager, Dan Smythe, said to Glamour. “Remember, the most flattering lip shape for you is your own, but enhanced. For the bottom lip, work from the center, at the lip’s fullest point, again working upwards with small strokes to connect the line at the corners.” When it comes to gloss, make sure the brand is legit, because some look like you’ve just applied a gel to your lips.

This is probably the most important lesson of them all: Don’t use too much makeup!

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Yes, we know you love makeup but that doesn’t mean you put every single product on and wear it every day. Remember, less is more. “I see more and more women wearing more and more makeup,” Beau Nelson, who works with Nicole Richie and Christina Hendricks said to Allure. “Though I’m a huge supporter of wanting to look the way you want to look, I’m concerned that a number of women are simply following an Instagram trend. To me, that much makeup doesn’t even look good in pictures with professional lighting, let alone in full daylight or under fluorescent office lights.”

Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

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Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

Remember the terrible days when “nude” shoes were on-trend and Black women everywhere were forced to take part in something that was meant for white women? Welp, the nude lip trend has done quite a bit of not so great favors for women of color as well. Fortunately, the black-owned beauty shop Whippd Cosmetics is blessing Black women with nude glosses that work for all of our skin tones.

On June 27, Rachel Robins the entrepreneur behind the Whippd brand announced that she’d be launching a line of nude glosses for Black women.

“I created 6 nude lip glosses made with black women in mind and I just want them to go viral! Twitter do your thing,” Robins wrote in a tweet that featured a video displaying the line with meltaonin-rich shades.

Soon enough, Twitter did do its thing and her post wrangled in over 50,000 likes and 26,000 retweets. Speaking to Teen Vogue Robins says she was “extremely shocked but also humbled” by the support she received from Twitter. “So many people messaged me about how the collection made them feel seen. It warmed my heart and was the extra boost I needed to keep going.”

Whippd Cosmetics’ first launch, called the Coco Collection, will include six different nude shades.

The glosses are rich with pigments that cater to Black women who are so often overlooked by beauty brands that still use words like “nude” to cover only a portion of the beauty market. After all, what big brands call “nude” typically works for white women only.

Speaking about her own personal experiences, Robins says she wanted to create nude lip glosses that cater specifically for Black women.

“My experience of trying to find the perfect nude lip color to match me was always unsuccessful,” Robins explained. “The colors I would use would either be too light, too dark or have a blaring red undertone. I would often have to mix together my own shades and I knew other black women have encountered the same issue while shopping for the perfect nude lip.”

The gloss shades launched on July 1st and are available on WhippdCosmetics.com.

The Coco Collection promises to “compliment your complexion” with colors that as sweet-sounding as their names are. From latte, amaretto, butterscotch to brown sugar, ebony, and truffle these shades will sweeten your heart. While the entire collection costs $48, each gloss goes for $10.

If Whippd’s new gloss line isn’t exciting enough, you’ll likely fall in love with their line of body butters and scrubs which are infused with essential oils.

Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

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Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

Mat Szwajkos / Getty

When it comes to buying products we all have a responsibility to know where our dollars go.

And while in the world of beauty it might seem a bit tricky to be conscientious of animal rights and our planet… it’s so essential. Fortunately, Sephora agrees and their latest announcement confirms it!

Recently, Sephora announced that it would no longer sell mink-based lashes online or in-store in an effort to combat animal cruelty.

Speaking to Allure this week, the big-box beauty store announced that they had started 2020 with efforts to phase mink lashes out of its stock. This week, after animal rights activist organization PETA launched a campaign demanding that the brand do so, the retailer confirmed that when it comes to false eyelashes they are going completely mink-free.

“Following a PETA campaign and emails from more than 280,000 concerned shoppers, Sephora has confirmed that it has banned mink-fur eyelashes and will purchase only synthetic or faux-fur lashes going forward,” PETA shared in a statement about the decision.

In a graphic video about the trading and selling of mink fur which is often used for coats and fake eyelashes, the organization urged Sephora to stop selling the beauty product.

*Warning this video is graphic*

The organization lambasted fur farms in its statement saying “As PETA pointed out in its letters to Sephora, mink fur typically comes from fur farms, where stressed minks frantically pace and circle endlessly inside cramped wire cages and many languish from infections or broken or malformed limbs. Some minks even self-mutilate as a result of the intensive confinement, chewing into their own limbs or tails. At the end of their miserable lives, they’re gassed or electrocuted or their necks are broken.”

Confirming their decision to take mink off of its shelves, Sephora wrote in a statement that they “have always been committed to upholding the highest standards of beauty, and we take our responsibility to communicate transparently and honestly with our clients about the products we carry seriously.”

The brand went on to say that they shared with PETA “earlier this year we had already decided to begin phasing mink products out of our assortment in 2020. We have only ever offered products our clients can trust and we stand by the people and partners who have made the Sephora experience what it is today.”