Fierce

These Latino Fashion Designers Are Putting Culture First In Swimwear

As good as it will feel to support any of these Latino-owned swimwear brands, you’ll feel so much better actually wearing their designs. Like always, knowing you’re supporting a Latino entrepreneur feels good, but these designers are putting Latino culture first in their products.

Ranging from birthplaces in Los Angeles to Puerto Rico to Brazil, these brands have their finger on the pulse of Latin culture and are either preserving 1940’s Cuban fashion or setting new trends. You can’t go wrong with these brands.

Viva La Bonita

Digital Image. Viva La Bonita. 3 July 2019.

Based in Los Angeles, every year, Viva La Bonita comes out with a new print for it’s open-backed, one-piece swimsuits, and we’re obsessed. Last year the print read “Allergic to Pendejadas.” We have a feeling this year’s suit will leave you feeling chingona-level bella.

Agua Bendita

@aguabenditasw / Instagram

Born out of their love for design that honors their Colombian heritage, Catalina Álvarez and Mariana Hinestroza have joined design forces to create Agua Bendita. Their brand also features other local artisans to elevate Colombian artistry around the world.

Jessica Milagros Swimwear

@jmilagrosplus / Instagram

Jessica Milagros had spent her career as a plus-size model and was disappointed with the swimwear available. It just wasn’t highlighting the beauty of curvy bodies. So she teamed up with JCPenney to create a line of plus-size, affordable swimwear.

Nicolita Swimwear

@laura.roque.a @brendalonso18 / Instagram

We love that this brand is all about preserving the fashion of 1940’s Cuban swimwear, while using today’s technologies to keep it comfy. Opt for heavy ruffles or a simple I ❤️ Cuba halter.

Del Mar by Berjheny

@delmarswimwear / Instagram

Venezuelan-born designer Berjheny Del Mar grew up in Aruba and knew her expertise was in coexisting with the ocean. Del Mar promotes ethically sourced fashion and says they aid “highly impoverished community of single mothers by providing them with an income, training scheme, stability and property in their communities and donations from the sales to their local charity.”

Yemaya Swimwear

@yemayaswimwear / Instagram

Paraguayan designer Carla Pallares has dedicated her line to the Goddess of the Ocean, Yemaya. The brand is committed to women being able to live care-free in comfort and style—whether it’s standing up on that surfboard or roasting in the sand.

MarAcuyá Swimwear

@maracuyaswimwear / Instagram

Based in Puerto Rico, MarAcuyá uses four-way stretch lycra made in Colombia, printed with their custom designs for a comfortable and stylish way to lay on the beach, surf or yoga. Their 2019 catalog is on sale now–and with so many of the pieces made with reversible fabrics, it’s like a twofer.

Mauna Loa Beachwear

MAUNALOABEACHWEAR / Etsy

Made in Venezuela, this Etsy company is “inspired by the tropical heat of its origin country” and it shows. You must check out designer Andreina Oliver pieces to see how traditional wear has translated into ruffled bikinis and one pieces alike.

Peixoto

@peixotowear / Instagram

Colombian designer Mauricio Esquenazi created Peixoto to honor nostalgia and classic beauty. You’re not going to find a tanga bottom here. For them, it’s all about “mystery, sophistication and elegance, without giving it all away at first glance.”

Luli Fama

@lulifamaswimwear / Instagram

Another Cuban fashion genius, Lourdes “Luli” Hanimian created Luli Fama to honor all of Latin America. Growing up in Miami, Luli wants to honor the bold prints of our culture with contemporary fits. People just don’t understand how so many of her swimsuits are universally flattering, but they are.

Lybethras

@lybethras / Instagram

Luciana “Lu” Martinez founded Lybethras in 2007 in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The brand name “Lybethras” means ‘source of muses’ in Latin. By the time Lu started her brand at age 19, she was creating muses left and right. Her goal is to create swimwear for all bodies, and her success is worldwide.

READ: How A Plus-Size Latina Model is Using Social Media to Encourage Women to Be Healthy

Reggaeton Singers Are Known For Being Flashy And Extra—We Rounded Up Their Most Iconic Lewks

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Reggaeton Singers Are Known For Being Flashy And Extra—We Rounded Up Their Most Iconic Lewks

Dsquared

Reggaeton has grown 1000% from 2009 to 2019. With the genre making waves all over the world, it is little wonder that high end brands such as Chanel, Balenciaga and more, are turning to Reggaetoneros to promote their clothes to a “new” market; Latinos. As the genre has started to grow and ripen, so too has the genre’s biggest exponents’ style. From Medellin to Paris, and Puerto Rico to New York Fashion Week, our fave urbano singers have served some iconic lewks, and we rounded up our favorites for you to gawk at.

1. Bad Bunny’s Latin Grammys 2019 Outfit

Wearing a diamond face mask, red glasses, and long red coat with silver butterfly accents, Bad Bunny put everyone on their feet with this never-before-heard version of “Callaita” at the 2019 Grammy Awards #iconique

2. J Balvin in Off-White for Blanco

Just this week, the Colombian powerhouse dropped his brand new track ‘Blanco’, and hinted at a new solo album after the success of ‘Oasis’, his collab with Bad Bunny. The video served all white looks in a minimalistic vibe, during the video he wore a luxe, minimal Off-White boiler suit and we can only wish we could afford it. Maybe a Home Depot version will do for us.

3. Ozuna in Fendi at the 2019 Billboard awards

He already made it clear in the song ‘Solita’, “Conmigo todo Gucci, todo Fendi,” unsurprisingly, he lives by his own words. The Puerto Rican wore a comfy Fendi fit to perform at this year’s Billboard Awards where he won 11 prizes and was nominated for 25 categories.

4. Karol G in Tusa —basically every look

The queen of reggaeton served candy floss-colored LOOKS in her video ‘Tusa’ and slayed with Nicky Minaj. Is there anything more iconic? #Diosa

5. Becky G for Paper Magazine

The Inglewood native is a true style icon. In this cover story for the legendary fashion, popular culture, nightlife, music, art and film magazine, PAPER, she wore a muted monochromatic look and we STAN.

6. Maluma at the 2019 MET Gala.

This year Maluma made history after becoming the first Colombiano to set foot on the MET Gala’s pink carpet. And the stylish reggaetonero was obviously not about to disappoint his loyal subjects with a bland outfit. He wore a beaded pink and silver suit designed by Moschino.

7. Basically every look from Maluma’s F.A.M.E tour.

The pretty boy from Medellin can wear everything from skinny-jeans-and-boots-Jagger to aggro neon post-streetwear and look flawless—but we’ve got to say it, the dapper, suited up look he sported for his F.A.M.E. tour, really suits him.

8. Natti Natasha ‘Queening’ in her collab with Forever 21.

Nothing like a powerful woman who knows her worth and owns it. Earlier this year, Natti teamed up with Forever 21 to work on a collection focused on female empowerment, the size inclusive capsule collection included slogan tees, hoodies, biker shorts, accessories, and more. The queen in a ‘queendom’ top is a next level slay.

9. Bad Bunny’s all white look

This look stirred the internet into a frenzy, fans wondered whether his coat was real fur or synthetic -and two years later, I guess we’ll never find out. What’s true is that the white-out look is going down in history as one of the reggaetonero’s most iconic choice of clothes.

10. That time J Balvin made Chanel, street cool.

There was a time when J Balvin was Chanel’s favorite bad boy. Before the passing of Chanel’s designer and creative director Karl Lagerfeld earlier this year, J Balvin was seen hanging out and attending shows with the fashion titan. This era was a much chicer and simple time for Balvin’s style and we can’t say we don’t miss it.

11.  Becky G ‘Lady in The White Dress’

I mean, the beat, the hair, the dress, the GLAM! This was a total slay, no more words needed.

12. J Balvin at The Louis Vuitton show in Paris.

J Balvin back at it with the Paris Fashion Week outfits. The urbano singer was invited to attend the famous streetwear designer, Virgil Abloh’s very first show as Louis Vuitton’s creative director and his look was a utilitarian-chic dream. Definitely one for the books.

13. Bad Bunny’s ‘Si estuviesemos juntos’ video look

As much as Bad Bunny loves an acid tie-dye, or a neon-hued streetwear look, it seems like he also has some love for the classic, dapper look. The look is classic, yet timely when worn by the chart-topping Conejo Malo.

14. Daddy Yankee in Dior for ‘Con Calma’ Remix

There’s nothing more luxurious than a custom Christian Dior silk shirt. The ‘Gasolina’ singer usually errs in favor of caution when he chooses his clothes (not so much when it comes to jewelry), but on this occasion he went all out with a pastel-hued,floral print shirt and it quite suits him.

15. Ozuna, Anuel, Daddy Yankee and Karol G in matching outfits at the Billboards.

The all star team dressed up in matching neon-green outfits to perform their track “China” at this year’s Billboard awards and they look like a fashionable Latino Power Ranger squad —a show we’d definitely watch.

16. All of Becky Gs MTV EMA looks

Becky shed her ‘good girl’ look in favor of showing off the chic woman she’s turned into. At this year’s MTV EMAs she wore an elegant suit complete with a pussy bow shirt, skin baring bodysuits and a couple of uber chic mini dresses. We’re loving this renewed fierceness.

17. Maluma’s ‘Courtside Formal’.

The Colombian singer took in a Knicks game from court-side seats dripping in 1977’s finest finery, all designed by Gucci’s Alessandro Michele. And he looked fabulous if I do say so myself.

Some People Are Calling Out Makeup Companies For Crossing The Line Of Cheeky Names To Racial Tropes

Fierce

Some People Are Calling Out Makeup Companies For Crossing The Line Of Cheeky Names To Racial Tropes

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We’ve never worked in the cosmetic industry, so we can only assume that finding the perfect name for a product can be tricky to say the least. There are products with hilarious, and even NSFW names —NARS we’re talking to you. Apparently, the more scandalous the product is named, the better. Even some of the most trendy cosmetics have cheeky names, so it seems like in the world of beauty, anything goes. From cheeky, to ridiculous to just down-right offensive, here are some names that left us wondering; who approved these?

1. Chantecaille Foundation in the shade; ’Banana’.

www.nordstrom.com

As opposed to the cute names appointed to lighter shades, such as “Aura” and “Vanilla;” the darker shade was named “Banana”. Now, maybe it’s just me, but giving a darker skin tone the name ‘banana’ sounds like a good enough reference to the monkey comparison. Comparing dark-skinned people to monkeys is a racial stance as old as America and we’d love to find out what the Chantecaille team was thinking when they gave that name to a dark skin tone —smdh.

2. Color Pop Cosmetics’ “Yikes” and “Typo” sculpting stix. 

www.colorpop.com

In the same way, as we noted in the previous example, here the lighter skin tones had names like “Castle” and “Dove,” whereas the darker ones were titled “Typo” and “Yikes.” Yikes, is there anything shocking or alarming about a darker skin tone? Nobody’s skin is a typo, Color Pop.

ColourPop issued an apology statement and quickly renamed the deeper shades. The Sculpting Stix as a whole has since been discontinued.

2. MAC Cosmetics’ “Vibe Tribe” Collection.

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I mean… do we have to keep saying this? Indigenous cultures are not fashion —or in this case beauty— trends. This 2016 collection was instantly accused of cultural appropriation and enforcing Native American stereotypes. The packaging of the collection featured ‘tribal’ patterns and the shades had names such as “Arrowhead” and “Call of the Canyon.” What’s worse, the campaign featured models wearing Native American headdresses —which we’ve established time and again, is disrespectful AF.

3. MAC Cosmetics x Rodarte “Juarez” polish.

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Ciudad Juarez is a city known for the phenomenon of female homicides, called feminicidio in Spanish. The city has been—famously, may I add—plagued by the violent deaths of hundreds of women and girls since 1993. MAC and fashion house Rodarte collaborated in a highly anticipated collection inspired by Mexico in 2010. One of the nail polishes in the collection was named ‘Juarez’, which disturbed customers and social media users. 

MAC apologized but kept the product on its shelves —guess they weren’t that sorry. The makeup brand did, however, “give a portion of the proceeds from the MAC Rodarte collection to help those in need in Juarez.”

4. The Balm’s “Meet Matt” eye shadow palette.

www.thebalm.com

Every shade in this eye shadow palette, which is still available under the site’s bestseller section, was named for a different “Matt,” and many found it’s choice of last names questionable. 

The brand paired the last names Lin, Lopez, Kumar, and Ahmed to yellow, brown, brick red, and black shades, which a lot of customers —ourselves included— found racist. 

5. Ben Nye’s Cream Character Base.

Back in 2015, Ben Nye, the special FX and stage makeup brand, sold a deep complexion base cream called “Minstrel Brown”. FYI —and get ready to have your mind blown— Minstrels were theatric shows performed by white actors in blackface during the 19th century. The shows were specifically intended to mock and degrade black people. 

Ben Nye renamed the shade —and every shade in the collection— but the brand never apologized or commented on the incredibly inappropriate name. 

6. “Iris I Was Thinner” OPI nail polish

www.makeupalley.com

Because women need to be reminded of the toxic beauty ideal that we ‘should strive to be thin’. This nail polish is a no from me, dog. 

7. “Miso Happy With This Color” OPI nail polish.

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We’ll admit that some of OPI’s nail polish color names make us giggle. But not when they’re making puns that suggest a stereotype of how Asians speak. According to portrayals in pop culture, an Asian face must mean an Asian accent — and often, the accent is for comedic effect in movies and television shows.

8. Fenty’s “Geisha Chic” highlighter

Instagram @trendmood1

Ok, we love queen RiRi but more often than not, Asian targeted racism gets glossed over and we’re not here for this name. A Geisha or ‘Geiko’ is a Japanese woman who entertains guests through talents such as dance, music, and singing —the tradition can be traced back centuries, and it’s not fair to minimize it. 

Fenty team members personally messaged the people that left comments about the product on Instagram and quickly pulled the highlighter from their online store. “We wanted to personally apologize. Thank you so much for educating us,” read their apology.

9. Wycon’s “Black As A N***a”

www.wyconcosmetics.com

At this point, I feel like brands are using racial insensitivity as a marketing ploy. Because in what world does it seem right to give a product —or anything else for the matter- this name? A quick scroll through the Italian beauty brand will leave you pressed to find any representation of people of color —but of course hip-hop culture is up for grabs when it comes to the naming of product shades for the brand, which also uses names like “Drop it Like It’s Hot” and “Bootylicious.” #cancelled

10. Kat Von D’s “Selektion” lipstick shade

twitter @thekatvond

Kat Von D has been accused of anti-semitism time and again, and I guess we’ll never know if it’s a real claim or if it’s just a product of Twitter users’ machinations. But one thing is true, her eponymous makeup line launched a lipstick shade with the name “Selektion,” which in German simply means “screening,” or “picking.” However, the use of the German word in English speek has become taboo due to the use it had by Nazis in the selection of prisoners for death in concentration camps. 

Whether the name was a deliberately insensitive pick or just an honest mistake, we would’ve erred on the side of caution and steered clear of a polemic word.