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These Latino Fashion Designers Are Putting Culture First In Swimwear

As good as it will feel to support any of these Latino-owned swimwear brands, you’ll feel so much better actually wearing their designs. Like always, knowing you’re supporting a Latino entrepreneur feels good, but these designers are putting Latino culture first in their products.

Ranging from birthplaces in Los Angeles to Puerto Rico to Brazil, these brands have their finger on the pulse of Latin culture and are either preserving 1940’s Cuban fashion or setting new trends. You can’t go wrong with these brands.

Viva La Bonita

Digital Image. Viva La Bonita. 3 July 2019.

Based in Los Angeles, every year, Viva La Bonita comes out with a new print for it’s open-backed, one-piece swimsuits, and we’re obsessed. Last year the print read “Allergic to Pendejadas.” We have a feeling this year’s suit will leave you feeling chingona-level bella.

Agua Bendita

@aguabenditasw / Instagram

Born out of their love for design that honors their Colombian heritage, Catalina Álvarez and Mariana Hinestroza have joined design forces to create Agua Bendita. Their brand also features other local artisans to elevate Colombian artistry around the world.

Jessica Milagros Swimwear

@jmilagrosplus / Instagram

Jessica Milagros had spent her career as a plus-size model and was disappointed with the swimwear available. It just wasn’t highlighting the beauty of curvy bodies. So she teamed up with JCPenney to create a line of plus-size, affordable swimwear.

Nicolita Swimwear

@laura.roque.a @brendalonso18 / Instagram

We love that this brand is all about preserving the fashion of 1940’s Cuban swimwear, while using today’s technologies to keep it comfy. Opt for heavy ruffles or a simple I ❤️ Cuba halter.

Del Mar by Berjheny

@delmarswimwear / Instagram

Venezuelan-born designer Berjheny Del Mar grew up in Aruba and knew her expertise was in coexisting with the ocean. Del Mar promotes ethically sourced fashion and says they aid “highly impoverished community of single mothers by providing them with an income, training scheme, stability and property in their communities and donations from the sales to their local charity.”

Yemaya Swimwear

@yemayaswimwear / Instagram

Paraguayan designer Carla Pallares has dedicated her line to the Goddess of the Ocean, Yemaya. The brand is committed to women being able to live care-free in comfort and style—whether it’s standing up on that surfboard or roasting in the sand.

MarAcuyá Swimwear

@maracuyaswimwear / Instagram

Based in Puerto Rico, MarAcuyá uses four-way stretch lycra made in Colombia, printed with their custom designs for a comfortable and stylish way to lay on the beach, surf or yoga. Their 2019 catalog is on sale now–and with so many of the pieces made with reversible fabrics, it’s like a twofer.

Mauna Loa Beachwear

MAUNALOABEACHWEAR / Etsy

Made in Venezuela, this Etsy company is “inspired by the tropical heat of its origin country” and it shows. You must check out designer Andreina Oliver pieces to see how traditional wear has translated into ruffled bikinis and one pieces alike.

Peixoto

@peixotowear / Instagram

Colombian designer Mauricio Esquenazi created Peixoto to honor nostalgia and classic beauty. You’re not going to find a tanga bottom here. For them, it’s all about “mystery, sophistication and elegance, without giving it all away at first glance.”

Luli Fama

@lulifamaswimwear / Instagram

Another Cuban fashion genius, Lourdes “Luli” Hanimian created Luli Fama to honor all of Latin America. Growing up in Miami, Luli wants to honor the bold prints of our culture with contemporary fits. People just don’t understand how so many of her swimsuits are universally flattering, but they are.

Lybethras

@lybethras / Instagram

Luciana “Lu” Martinez founded Lybethras in 2007 in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The brand name “Lybethras” means ‘source of muses’ in Latin. By the time Lu started her brand at age 19, she was creating muses left and right. Her goal is to create swimwear for all bodies, and her success is worldwide.

READ: How A Plus-Size Latina Model is Using Social Media to Encourage Women to Be Healthy

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Yaltiza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

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Yaltiza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

Dior/ Youtube.com

In the two years that have passed since her debut as an actress in the 2018 Academy Award-winning film Roma, Yaltiza Aparicio has established herself as a Hollywood “get.” The Indigenous actress has appeared countless times on the cover of magazines, ones like Vogue México and Vanity Fair, and has been featured in ad campaigns for designers like Rodarte. So it’s no surprise that she has now been tapped to be part of Dior’s new campaign “Dior Stands with Women.”

As part of an effort to celebrate women across the film, beauty, and health industries Dior has launched its “Dior Stands with Women” campaign.

On Monday, the fashion brand announced it had launched a series of short films honoring women and their contributions to the industries and communities which they occupy. The campaign features actresses like Yaltiza Aparicio, model Paloma Elsesser, dancer Leyna Bloom, Cara Delevingne, Charlize Theron, Parris Goebel, and others.

In a statement about the campaign, Dior announced their intent in a post on Instagram. “Inspired by the exceptional women who have marked its history, Christian Dior Parfums unveils a series of short filmed portraits that give a chance to speak to extraordinary women,” it reads.

Speaking in the portrait series, Aparicio explains “For me, being a woman means being strong, always holding your head up because they tell you what they say, you must be sure of what you are capable of,” she went onto say that as “as an ambassador for UNESCO, my role is to represent indigenous communities with dignity. Give them a voice and visibility, which is something that we have lacked for a long time… Women have fought for many years for gender equality. It is not about being superior to men, it is about having the same opportunities, that in your work they give you a fair salary and not simply because you are a woman they pay you less or that they consider that you have fewer capacities simply because you are a woman.”

Speaking about their journeys, actresses Cara Delevinge and Charlize Theron touched on being unapologetic and part of male-dominated industries.

Check out Yalitza and the others in the Dior campaigns below.

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These $1,200 Gucci Jeans Are Designed With Grass Stains Around The Knees And Are Not Worth The Joke

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These $1,200 Gucci Jeans Are Designed With Grass Stains Around The Knees And Are Not Worth The Joke

Gucci / Twitter

In these tough times, Gucci’s latest line proves that you might be able to get a fortune out of the jeans you use as workwear in the yard. The upscale label recently launched a new line of jeans and overalls featuring a grass stain effect on their knees. But these are not your father’s cutting the lawn jeans.

The oversized pants retail for a cool $1,400 and feature large pockets and side buttons…

Users on Twitter were quick to question whether or not the new jeans were a joke by Gucci or a reflection of just how tone-deaf the high-end label is.

“How did it take so long for this to become a thing? My entire wardrobe just became more valuable!” one user tweeted in response. A second user commented, “Yeah not a Good Look!!! Wouldn’t buy those Jeans at the Thrift Store for a Dollar!!!”

It wasn’t long ago that the designer brand received criticism for selling warn-in sneakers that were “treated for an all-over distressed effect.”

The kicks were valued at $870. The brand’s description of the shoe design boasted that it was inspired by “vintage” 70s styles.

“The Screener sneakers — named for the defensive sports move — feature the Web stripe on the side and vintage Gucci logo, treated for an allover distressed effect,” the website explained.

Takeaway? Money sure can’t buy good taste.

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