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#YouKnowMe Is The Viral Hashtag Latinas Are Using To Tell Their Freeing Abortion Stories After Alabama Lawmakers Passed One Of The Most Extreme Abortion Bans In The Country

State leaders in Alabama voted to outlaw abortion in their state. The bill, which was approved by the majority last night, prohibits abortion in almost every case except if the mother’s life is in extreme danger. That means if a child or adult get raped by a stranger or family member, they must still carry the baby to full-term. The bill now has to be signed by the governor, and she is presumably going to do so. Thankfully the court system is on the sides of women because, under the 14th amendment, abortion is legal in the U.S. and will continue to be as long as advocates keep fighting for it. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said they would take all of the bills trying to ban abortion — and there are now several states.

To bring attention to the abortion issue, women on social media are sharing their stories under the hashtag #YouKnowMe.

The movement first began when actress and late-night host, Busy Phillips shared her abortion story on her show “Busy Tonight.” After the Alabama abortion ban was approved, she tweeted that others should share their story as well.

Filmmaker and co-founder of the Women’s March, Paola Mendoza share that her mother had an abortion.

“In light of the abortion ban in Alabama, it is imperative that we tell our stories about abortions,” Mendoza said on Instagram. “I have posted this story several times already. It may be new for some of you. For others, it is a story that you have read. Regardless it is a story that must continue to be told because our right to choose is being taken away from us. Share your abortion story. There is power is telling your truth.”

Other Latinas have shared that their decision to follow through with abortion came as a result of sexual assault.

Under the new Alabama law, if doctors performed an abortion on a woman that was raped, they would get 99 years in prison.

One revealed that she simply did not feel financially or emotionally ready at the time.

Who would benefit from a baby being born to someone who is not ready?

Another revealed that following through with a pregnancy would have risked her health and likely the fetus’s.

The new Alabama law would allow abortion only if the mother’s life was in danger.

This Latina admitted that she wasn’t a teen mother when she had her abortion. Pregnancy was simply not an option for her.

Abortions are attached with so much stigma and it’s a shame because in so many cases it can save lives.

Planned Parenthood has been the backbone to this cause since day one.

Planned Parenthood has also promised to fight these bans right along with the ACLU.

You don’t need to explain your reasons to no one.

If you weren’t ready to be a mom, enough said.

Young but in charge of her choices.

Taking the right away from a women to choose is simply wrong.

A former drug addict comes clean with her truth.

What a story!

Do you have an abortion story you’d like to share? Let us know in the comment section below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Georgia Woman Poses As an FBI Agent to Try and Get Free Chick-Fil-A

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Georgia Woman Poses As an FBI Agent to Try and Get Free Chick-Fil-A

Photo: Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Chick-Fil-A is the fast food restaurant with arguably the largest cult following the United States (yes, including you, In-N-Out). Not only do the employees serve the juiciest fried chicken and the tastiest lemonade (and don’t get us started on the waffle fries!), but they do so with a perpetual smile on their faces. No matter how many extra sauces you request, you’ll never get any snark or pushback. You’ll always get a “My pleasure,” though.

Recently, however, one woman’s devotion to Chick-Fil-A went a little too far.

According to The Smoking Gun, 47-year-old Kimberley Ragsdale wanted free Chick-Fil-A so badly that she impersonated an…FBI agent.

You read that right. While we don’t know how being an FBI agent would automatically entitle you to free Chick-Fil-A, we respect this woman’s creativity.

The story goes as follows: last Thursday, police received a call from a Chick-Fil-A in Rockford, Georgia alleging that there was a “suspicious person” at their location who was “identifying themselves as a federal agent to try and get free food.”

When cops got to the scene, they found Ragsdale parked in the location’s parking lot in a white van. The police officer then asked Ragsdale if she had been identifying herself as an FBI officer. She admitted but also continued to insist that she was, indeed, a federal officer. When the police officer asked her for her badge, Ragsdale claimed that she did not have a physical copy of her credentials, only an “electronic” one. For some reason, this explanation didn’t sit right with the police officer.

Ragsdale was then removed from the vehicle at which point, according to the police report, she began to “talk into her shirt like she was talking into a radio,” asking for backup.

Spoiler alert: the backup never came. Because the backup never existed.

After she was taken away, a Chick-Fil-A employee told an officer at the scene that Ragsdale had been coming to the location “or several days saying she worked with the FBI and requested free food.”

Ragsdale was booked with impersonating a public official. No word on whether she was also charged for the free meal she received.

Naturally, this bizarre story set the Twitterverse abuzz.

Chalk it up to Chick-Fil-A’s near universal appeal, but this incident quickly made national headlines. People had a lot to say.

Of course, people saw this story as an opportunity to bust out their favorite memes.

This woman may not have been a criminal mastermind, but her goal was relatable. Who among us hasn’t craved Chick-Fil-A at any cost?

This person asked a question we’ve been wondering since we originally saw this story:

And she would’ve gotten away with it too, if it wasn’t for those meddling kids.

And if the FBI *does* get free Chick-Fil-A, then they should definitely put that in their recruitment literature.

Honestly, if this is the case, please point us to the nearest recruiter for the FBI.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

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Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

Mark Reinstein / Getty

With so much at stake this election year, it’s important to understand the circumstances behind some of our biggest beliefs. Currently there are little questions as to whether Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is in opposition to a person’s right to abortion. Her Catholic faith, her academic writing, and accounts from friends affirm that she has opposes the medical procedure. During a 2017 confirmation hearing for her current position as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Coney Barret stated that she was bound to follow the Roe decision as an appeals court judge stating “Roe has been affirmed many times and survived many challenges in the court… And it’s more than 40 years old, and it’s clearly binding on all courts of appeals. And so it’s not open to me or up to me, and I would have no interest in, as a court of appeals judge, challenging that precedent.”

There’s likely no chance of changing her mind, but we were curious about how women felt.

A recent post on Reddit posed the question: What changed your mind on abortion?

Check out the answers below!

“Being pregnant (with a very much wanted baby). I’ve always been pro choice, but learning about how much can go wrong in a pregnancy made it very apparent abortion is far from a black and white issue. For example, say the fetus has some defect where it can be carried to term, but will 100% die shortly after birth. There is no reason the mother should be forced to carry out the whole pregnancy. There are so many other nuances like this that are not possible to legislate.” – kittyinparis

“having one myself. i was religious, orthodox christian once upon a time. i hate to be one of those people who didn’t understand something until i experienced it myself but it is what it was. i extremely naive and ignorant because i thought that it was as simple as “don’t get pregnant if you don’t want a kid”. but it’s really not. and you never know what someone’s story is. and even then, regardless of their situation i think if someone doesn’t want to be pregnant it’s immoral to force them to be.” – Reddit user

“Honestly? Biology class. They went over sexual reproduction step by step and I just couldn’t buy the whole “humanity begins at conception” thing anymore. Then I started reading what all those scary buzzwords meant and I got a bit pissed off. Turns out the evil “partial-birth abortions” are usually called D&Es and they’re usually only done to babies with no chance of survival or in the cases of miscarriages. That’s not evil. That’s sad. I felt lied to, in a big way.” – Moritani

“I learned more about the concepts of bodily autonomy and consent and decided that it’s wrong to force people to remain pregnant against their will.” – enerjem

“When I first learned about the concept it seemed like a terrible thing but even after just 20 minutes of research (I did a lot more clearly, but this is just to emphasize how simple this decision was) I became pro-choice at 14ish, and I’ve had that stance ever since. So I only barely changed my mind really, but I think it counts because without looking into it I could’ve gone on believing it to be morally repugnant just because of what it sounds like and because it’s a subject that’s so easy to get carried away on and not look at objectively.” – ypical_Humanoid

“Paying my own bills. It’s a lot harder to feed two mouths than one.” – Reddit user

“Having kids. Pre-kids i was very prolife. Went to rallys and everything. Would have stressed and felt guilty if i got pregnant and dont knownwhat i would have chosen though. 4 kids later and several oops…im very pro choice.” – Strikingachord

“I was pro-life until I was about 13. I figure my brain developed more and I was then better able to see the issue in a more global and expansive way and determined that pro-choice was the most ethical stance.” – searedscallops

“Meeting someone in college who had had one in the past, and who spoke openly about it. She didn’t regret it or torture herself with guilt and shame over it, but she wasn’t a depraved monster, either. She was a wonderful person who did what was best for herself and her situation.” –coffeeblossom

“Having to get one myself.” –aj4ever

“I don’t know that I was ever pro-life in the same way I don’t think I was ever really Christian. I grew up in an Evangelical Protestant denomination, and until about middle school I mostly parroted things I heard. Things like “hate the sin love the sinner” for anything from being gay to probably having an abortion.

Sometime around middle school I started questioning all of it, forming my own opinions on things. I landed on atheist pro-choice feminist and have stayed there since.” – DejaBlonde

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