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This Latina Fat Acceptance Activist Is Being Harassed After She Was Included In A ‘Cringe Compilation’ Without Her Consent

Jude Valentin is a Latina woman of size with a presence on the Internet, so, unfortunately, she is familiar with the vitriol that comes with being a marginalized person with a voice online. But that cruelty escalated when she became the target of a hateful YouTube compilation video.

While Valentin is used to the occasional fatphobic comment on her own YouTube channel and Instagram posts, she noticed an uptick in cadence and comments even started getting violent. At first, she didn’t understand why, but then she noticed that one of the commenters referred to a compilation video.

After a quick search, she discovered that one of her vlogs was added to a “fat acceptance cringe” video. In these “Cringe Compilation” videos, which are trending on YouTube and garner up to millions of views, the creator pieces together awkward moments that are intended to make the viewer cringe. In some cases, these videos are innocent, including clips of clumsy circumstances and pranks. Increasingly, though, these videos are now being created to attack people from marginalized communities, including fat activists and LGBTQ+ individuals.

In the compilation video Valentin was included in, the creator used an entire vlog to mock her using some of her own videos and reaction GIFs.

“I think the most disheartening part of it is this person has 16,000 subscribers. I have barely 2,000 subscribers,” Valentin, a New York-based Puerto Rican content creator, told BuzzFeed. “I’m struggling to make ends meet. That’s the most frustrating part.”

Sadly, YouTube hasn’t been of much help to her, either. While Valentin did notify the video-sharing website, the company said the video did not break any policies.

“At YouTube, we understand the value of free expression and take great care when we enforce our policies,” a YouTube representative told Valentin in a direct message on Twitter. “As such, while we will take down content that crosses the line into threats or harassment when flagged, not all negative videos or comments will be removed.”

Valentin, understandably, was not satisfied with the response.

“Yes, the person in the video is not telling me to go kill myself, and they have a harassment disclaimer,” she said, “but that doesn’t stop their followers from going and harassing me.”

In an interview with BuzzFeed, the video’s creator said while those included in the compilation “probably see themselves as victims,” the videos are made to spread “awareness that there is a movement called fat acceptance.”

“I in no way tell my viewers to attack any of the people in my videos. I don’t encourage it. When someone in my comments asks for a channel name, I never give it to them. I will never tell my viewers to harass anybody,” he said.

Valentin could file a copyright strike against the video, but doing so would force her to reveal her full legal name to the creator, which could lead to doxing, broadcasting private information about someone that makes them susceptible to attacks — a growing concern for digital activists.

“It’s hard when activism is involved because we are so, so hated on the internet, and people are just ready to be nasty and unleash out private information and be spiteful and not treat us like people,” she said.

While Valentin ponders her next move, she said she’s done feeling bad about the cringe video. Describing herself as “very loud” and “not ashamed” of her body and identity, she said she’s ready to continue her work as a woman of color fat acceptance activist.

“I’ve done too much, I’ve come too far, that bullies are not allowed to affect my world,” she said. “People are going to harass me no matter what, and they can’t win.”

Read: 5 Crucial Lessons We Learned About Fatphobia, As Taught By Chicana Body Liberation Author Virgie Tovar

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Here’s What Latinas Have To Say About The Ways In Which They’ve Dealt With Poor Body Image

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Here’s What Latinas Have To Say About The Ways In Which They’ve Dealt With Poor Body Image

Lupita Nyongo / Instagram

A study published by Girls’ Attitudes Survey in 2016, asserts that in the U.S. 40% of girls have poor body confidence. This is a statistic that highlights an endemic problem that extends beyond the United States and stretches across the globe and affects communities on different levels. In fact, recent studies have shown that Latinas in particularly experience complications with body at rates that are comparable to women who are not of color. These statistics say quite a bit how common the universal struggle with body image is and how incredibly silent and dangerous it can be. 

Fortunately, more and more women are speaking out about this issue. This is especially for celebrities in recent years who have been impacted by the toxic culture that have manifested from the exchange of opinions on social media in an extreme way. To highlight the ways in which Latina celebrities are addressing the issue, we scavenged the internet for their most profound comments about their body image issues.

Selena Gomez 

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Puma fam. In my Cali Sport. @pumasportstyle ❤

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“I experienced [body-shaming] with my weight fluctuation for the first time,” Selena said to Raquelle Stevens during a video podcast for an episode of Giving Back Generation. “I have lupus and deal with kidney issues and high blood pressure, so I deal with a lot of health issues, and for me that’s when I really started noticing more of the body-image stuff… It’s the medication I have to take for the rest of my life — it depends on even the month, to be honest. So for me, I really noticed when people started attacking me for that,” she said. “In reality, that’s just my truth. I fluctuate. It depends what’s happening in my life. No one owes anyone else an explanation about their weight, and no one should be shamed or made fun of because of their body. Still, Selena said the critics “really messed [her] up for a bit,” and made her rethink how much of her life she puts online. I’m very happy with living my life and being present. Because that’s it. Similar to me posting a photo and walking away. For me that’s it. I will do a red carpet, I will do whatever. I don’t need to see it. I participated. I felt wonderful and that’s where the extent of it is,” she said. “I don’t care to expose myself to everyone and hear what they have to say about it.”

Lupita Nyongo 

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Speaking about embracing the color of her skin told The Hollywood Reporter recently that “There is a part of me that will always feel unattractive. That’s OK, because it will keep me grounded. I don’t need to be so full of myself that I feel I am without flaw. I can feel beautiful and imperfect at the same time. I have a healthy relationship with my aesthetic insecurities.”

America Ferrera

There’s no denying that America Ferrera, the actress who first caught our attention for her role in “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” has played a huge part in the body acceptance movement. Speaking to Health Ferrera said “I’m just now starting to feel like I want to feel strong in my body again. I didn’t work out as much as I imagined I would during my pregnancy. I was in triathlon shape when I got pregnant. I had so much on my plate and something had to give.”

She later explained in the interview that more important than what she looks like, she wants to monitor how food makes her feel. “I just try to be aware of how does what I eat make me feel,” she told the magazine. “Do I feel better? Do I feel energized? Does this make me tired and not feel great? I try to go easy on myself…which is a challenge because, like so many women, I demand so much more of myself than I would ever demand of someone else.”

Amara La Negra  

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It’s Now or NEVER!

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“I used to hate my big thighs, my fat ass, my cellulite, my hips!” La Negra told the Miami Herald. “I was bulimic for three years and hospitalized twice. I always wanted to be skinny and tall like the Victoria’s Secret models. It took me a long time to accept that this is my body!”

Jennifer Lopez 

“It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.”

“It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.””It’s hard to avoid comparing yourself to others, and I’ve definitely been guilty of it myself,” Lopez told HELLO!. “I remember thinking I wasn’t thin enough because I had curves. But I’ve learned that being healthy and feeling great aren’t about having one specific body type; it’s a completely individual thing.”

She Was Body-Shamed During The 2016 Olympics And Has Now Been Named Mexico’s Best Non-Professional Athlete

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She Was Body-Shamed During The 2016 Olympics And Has Now Been Named Mexico’s Best Non-Professional Athlete

alexa.morenomx / Instagram

In 2016, Mexicana Alexa Moreno traveled to Rio de Janeiro to compete for her country in the Olympics. Mexico rooted for her as she impressively competed in the uneven bars, floor exercise, beam, vault and more, earning 31st place. Meanwhile, instead of being deeply impressed by her skills, Mexican Twitter trolls body-shamed her. Not for long. Some people around the world rallied to her defense and pointed out her superior athleticism.

In fact, Mexico just awarded Moreno with the Premio Nacional del Deporte, naming her the best non-professional athlete in the entire country.

In a video shared to Twitter, gymnast Alexa Moreno thanked her supporters.

Credit: @alexa_moreno_mx / Twitter

“Thank you for this recognition and thanks to all who have supported me on the way to get here,” she captioned the video. “Today, I was informed that I was the winner of the Premio Nacional del Deporte. I’m very shocked. The truth is that I didn’t imagine this would happen at all,” she told her fans in the video. “It’s a huge surprise. It’s very gratifying. Yes, I’m very, very happy. There’s nothing else to say but thank you to everyone. I want to thank everyone who has been a part of my journey. There’s been an entire circle of people around me. It’s not just me. It’s not just my job. I want to thank all the people who believed in me, for believing in me. Thank you very much.”

Moreno is the first Mexican woman gymnast to medal at a world championship.

@alexa_moreno_mx / Twitter

Moreno became the first Mexican woman to medal at a world championship just last year, when she earned bronze on vault. Last month, Moreno competed in the 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships in Stuttgart, Germany. Her performance on vault qualified her for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo!

Moreno’s supporters emoji-clapping all over Twitter.

“HONOR TO WHOM HONOR IS DUE,” tweeted sports journalist Jocelin Flores in Spanish. “Alexa Moreno, the first Mexican to climb the podium of the World Artistic Gymnastics Championship, is the winner of the 2019 National Sports Award, Non-Professional category.” One mother tweeted at Moreno to say in Spanish, “Congratulations! You are a great role model for the children of the country.”

“The most deserved,” tweeted Twitter user Sebastián, “I think she’s already established herself as the best Mexican gymnast of all time.”

When the haters were hating, some people were creating beautiful illustrations of Moreno.

Credit: Jose Acosta / Facebook

Moreno signed up for gymnastics when she was just 3-years-old. “Mexico needs people who prove that everything is possible,” Moreno told CCTV America in 2016. “You need to believe in yourself and fight to be able to do things that no one has ever done before.” Moreno is just 4’11” and 99 pounds. As the haters started deleting their tweets, Alexa Moreno went viral for all the fan art her inspirational performance generated.

We hope all the Mexican niñas are watching and being inspired by Moreno.

Credit: @kaleidoscopao / Instagram

“I can’t believe the criticism and bullying of #AlexaMoreno,” one Mexican woman shared to Instagram, along with a video of her routine. “I see this routine and I applaud it, it excites me, it inspires me. This girl is a champion and an example to follow. I was a gymnast and BELIEVE ME it is very difficult to reach that level in this country where the support for gymnastics is almost nil. How can it be that instead of being proud and encouraging we are the first to trash her?!?! What kind of country are we? How do we intend to train valuable athletes if we are the first to throw them down?!?!”

Even though Moreno did nothing to achieve her beauty, we have to say, she’s so beautiful.

Credit: @danpichardo / Twitter

Of course, we should all be talking about how 23 years of regimented, back-breaking athleticism has made her Mexico’s best gymnast. That takes the kind of athletic work that many of us will never know. Moreno is also “drop-dead gorgeous” as my mom would say. Not that it matters.

Felicidades a la favorita de México!

Credit: @publisportmx / Twitter

We are rooting for you, Moreno! The medal that qualified her for the 2020 Olympics scored at a 14.508, less than one point behind the infamous U.S. gymnastics gold champion Simone Biles. Mexico has never taken home a medal in gymnastics. With Moreno competing on behalf of México, we’re high-key rooting she becomes the first Mexican to climb up on an Olympic podium to medal in gymnastics. Let the haters hate. Mexico loves you, Moreno, and so do we.

READ: A Mexican Gymnast Who Was Body-Shamed During The 2016 Olympics Just Qualified For The 2020 Games