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Justina Machado Will Play Florence, The Maid, In ABC’s Remake Of ‘The Jeffersons’ And Fans Think It’s A Test On How ODAAT Will Do

In the mid ’70s-’80s TV audiences were glued to two sitcoms “All In The Family” and “The Jeffersons.” Both programs dealt with issues that continue to be prevalent today including racism and social class status.

While these shows are long gone, they have remained a staple of pop culture that is remembered by an older generation. It is that generation that is bringing the shows back to educate and entertain a whole new audience.

On May 22, ABC will air a one-night live event, remaking “All In The Family” and “The Jeffersons.”

The 90-minute show will be hosted by Jimmy Kimmel and Norman Lear and is being called “Live in Front of a Studio Audience: Norman Lear’s All in the Family and The Jeffersons.”

Lear is the famed writer that worked on those shows back then, including “One Day At A Time” and the remake, which unfortunately got canceled. Lear will be working once again with one of the stars “One Day At A Time” in the new live event.

Justina Machado will star in the remake of “The Jeffersons” playing Florence the maid.

Instagram/@justinamachado

Machado joins a huge A-list group of actors on this special one-night TV event. Woody Harrelson will play the lead as Archie Bunker in “All In The Family,” and “The Jeffersons, Machado will work alongside Jamie Fox, Wanda Sykes, Will Ferrell, and more.

“The fact that a group of Oscar winners eagerly agreed to play these iconic characters is a testament to the greatness of these shows and their creator, Norman Lear. To be a part of this is a dream come true for me and for everyone involved,” Kimmel said, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

While we are extremely thrilled that this remake is diverse, we can’t help but wonder why a Latina had to play a maid. Some say the casting is a bit off.

Machado’s character is Florence, the maid to the wealthy family, the Jeffersons. In the ’70s, Florence was played by the legendary actress Marla Gibbs. We don’t doubt Machado will do a brilliant job in the role, we are just a tad bummed that a Latina is playing the stereotypical role of the maid.

Some people on social media say a black woman should have played the role of Florence and that Sykes should be the maid instead of Machado.

Not all fans were impressed by the casting.

“No shade to Justina Machado, because she is in other shows I have watched and liked, but this ain’t her role,” Simone wrote on Facebook.

Some just want the Florence character to be portrayed by a black woman.

We will definitely tune in to see how this plays out. Will you?

Some however were super pumped that the casting could mean ABC was putting out ODAAT feelers

Because we want our show back!!

And pretty much everyone was begging ABC to do another live special of their favorites

Fingers crossed we get ‘¿Qué Pasa, USA?’!

READ: This Is How Justina Machado Went From Being A Bank Teller To Penelope In ‘One Day At A Time’

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It’s Finally Justina Machado’s Time to Shine

Entertainment

It’s Finally Justina Machado’s Time to Shine

Photo: Getty Images

On Monday, beloved (and not to mention, underrated) actress Justina Machado sat down for a wide-ranging interview with the Los Angeles Times.

In it, Machado covers everything from her lengthy career, to the sad state of Latinx representation in Hollywood, to the offensive phone call she had with a tone-deaf TV exec in the ’90s.

Finally, after almost 25 years of hard work in Hollywood, Machado is dominating America’s Monday nights with two high-profile gigs: a spot on “Dancing With the Stars” and the return of “One Day At a Time” to CBS after it was unceremoniously dropped by Netflix.

Naturally, with so much on her plate, the Puerto Rican actress in not only mentally, but physically exhausted. After all, “Dancing With the Stars” is notorious for its grueling practice and shoot schedules. “Every day when I come home, my routine is dunking my feet in [an ice bath],” she told the LA Times. “The first week and a half of rehearsals, forget about it–I was crying.”

But Machado is glad that she took the DWTS opportunity for what it means in terms of Latinx representation on network television.

“The thing about ‘Dancing With the Stars’ is it reaches so many more homes than [‘One Day at a Time’]…,” she told the publication. “I know they’ve had Latinas on the show, but they need a whole lot more. And so I was like, ‘I’m going to do that. I’m going to be that Puerto Rican woman that’s on that show.’”

Throughout the interview, Machado gets candid about what it’s like to be a Latina in the American entertainment industry–which is an unforgiving business.

She described the beginning of her career as plagued by insecurity. Before she began a professional acting career, Machado was convinced she couldn’t make it as an actor because professional acting “wasn’t a part of [her] world.” “Nobody was an actor in Chicago that I knew, in my neighborhood, in the inner city of Chicago,” she explained.

After she finally established her footing in Hollywood, she was then met with further doors slammed in her face in the form of racism and anti-Latino sentiment.

Like when an executive called her to tell her why her TV show wasn’t moving forward, back in the ’90s.

“He literally called my house, nice man… and said, ‘My God, your pilot is so great. Everybody loves you, everybody. But we don’t think America is ready for a Latino family.’”

What’s depressing about this story is that Latino representation onscreen still hasn’t gotten much better over 20 years later. But Machado is hopeful that the tides of change are turning

“That was acceptable for him to say…Like, what? And that was the ’90s! And look at today. How many Latino families do you see on television? So America better get ready because we’re here. We’re here.” We know that if Machado has anything to do with the future of TV, we’ll be seeing Latino families more and more often.

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Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Entertainment

Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Vampires vs. The Bronx

Over the weekend, to kick off the start of October, streamers unleashed a whole new slate of movies and series to binge while in isolation. To celebrate the Halloween season, most of the films and series are creep-related, drawing from some of our greatest everyday fears as All Hallows’ Eve content is often wont to do.

Using one of the scariest modern-day realities, Netflix’s newest film Vampires vs. The Bronx digs into one of the world’s scariest concepts: gentrification!

Ahh!!

Netflix’s newest movie, Vampires vs. The Bronx, follows three teenage boys fighting to save their neighborhood from bloodsucking gentrifiers.

The horror comedy film was written and directed by “Saturday Night Live” film segment director Osmany Rodriguez. You might know the director from his work on hysterical shorts for SNL including 2018’s “Complicit” which starred Scarlett Johansson as Ivanka Trump. Rodriguez also wrote the series’ faux Levi’s Woke commercial which featured Ryan Gosling, Pete Davidson, Leslie Jones, and Kenan Thompson.

According to Deadline, “Vampires vs. The Bronx” watches as “gentrification from an unlikely and deadly source creeps into the Bronx, a group of teenage friends rally to save the beloved local bodega and fight against a supernatural force intent on taking over their home at all costs.”

The new film takes audiences into the treasures of a neighborhood like The Bronx (like local bodegas and block parties) while introducing its worst nightmares (rocketing real estate prices, kale, and strange new business concepts).

So far, the film which was released on Oct. 2, has received rave reviews.

Speaking about the new Netflix pic, film reviewer RogerEbert.com describes the film as an observation of gentrification “for what it is—a form of white supremacy—and makes it an unmistakable evil, in which the pale monsters try to demoralize the residents by referring to the Bronx as ‘somewhere where no one cares when people disappear.'”

The best part? The new horror-comedy blasts us with all of the Latinidad.

With references to Sammy Sosa, characters who make up the full spectrum of U.S. Latin Americans (including Afro-Latino, and Haitian) this one seems like a classic in the making!

Check out the trailer below!

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