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Jessica Torres Went From Being Fat-Shamed At The Doctor To Building A Body Positivity Brand

Maybe we all deserve hundreds more Jessica Torres to remind us that this world and its fashion isn’t just for las flacas. Jessica Torres is a plus-size model and body positive activist who isn’t going to be shamed for hiding her nalgas or accentuating the “right” curves. We have all the curves which means they’re all right.

Jessica Torres is keeping it real and combatting fat shaming by just straight up loving her self and her body. She’s calling out magazines every time they reshape a woman’s mind to cover their belly or show it off. She’s posting images of the “most unflattering outfit for [her] body type” to prove a point to the fashion industry. Fashion for plus-size women shouldn’t be about how to best cover and mask their bodies. It should be about fashion. If Jessica Torres isn’t the most fashionable chingona from the Bronx, we don’t know who is. I said it.

Her journey towards crop tops wasn’t out of self-love, but rather a love for fashion.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

She started her plus-size style blog to show off her outfits and inspire other plus-size women to live “fashionable fat lives,” she writes for HipLatina. Her blog was meant to be a stepping stone to get a job in fashion. 

Torres essentially became a body positive advocate by accident.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

“Any plus-size body that grows a following on social media and takes full body pictures is instantly labeled a self-acceptance warrior,” she said. She was just wearing bright colors and modeling off the clothes that inspire her, and a social media following just naturally happened.

Still, she didn’t love her body.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

But she did notice that she was holding herself back from embracing a diverse range of fashion because of her “body type.” Magazines love to dress women like they’re fruit: pear shapes, apple shapes, etc. Instead of dressing women for fashion, the clothes are meant to hide certain parts of their bodies.

Once she realized she was holding her fashion style back because of the “hate” she had for her body, she knew she needed to change.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Like so many of us, she didn’t walk outside in a crop top and a skirt for the first time feeling confident and gleaming with body positivity. But you fake it till you make it, and now, Jessica Torres identifies as a self-acceptance advocate.

For every outfit she was afraid to wear, she had the courage to open up about it on social media.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

She started sharing stories of being fat-shamed at the doctor and saw the comment threads as a communal space of support and inspiration for other ladies living while fat. When she was afraid to wear a two-piece for the first time, she wrote about that, too, and found other women who gained the courage to do the same in solidarity.

As her following grows, she’s also experienced fat-shaming within the body-positivity community.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

Her body was always being compared to Ashley Graham’s or Iskra Lawrence. When Torres went up a single size in pants, she noticed how society still only accepts certain curves that are deemed beautiful. Meanwhile, others promote obesity. 

Torres is staying present to the hypocrisies and to her self.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

Caption: “Throwing it back to that time I was butt nekkid and wet and Kelly told me to sit on her lap.”

Being a social media influencer hasn’t made her any less real.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Torres has partnered with Mod Cloth, Dove, and JcPenney to promote body positivity. She’s sharing her insider tips for strapless bras with the thickest, most comfy straps. She’s also still a person who tells publicists she farted. ????

She’s not playing like her life is all together.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

While this would be very disappointing for all our mamis to read, it is deeply comforting to us all who have been traumatized by Saturday limpias. Where’s the link, Jessica?

Jessica Torres is the boss of all of us, and that’s how we like it.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Tell me more about how I can all parts of myself, not just the ones that make me look like an hourglass. Who chose hourglasses as the epitome of sexiness anyway? All we know is that self-hate is a time thief and we’re done robbing ourselves of love, time and fashion, thanks to Jessica Torres.

READ: This Latina Tries On A Thong For The First Time And The Results Are Relatable

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Jenny Solares Is One IG Creator Everyone Needs To Follow

Culture

Jenny Solares Is One IG Creator Everyone Needs To Follow

A year in quarantine has led so many of us to doom scroll and get lost in social media. As a result, some people are getting more recognition and one person who should be getting your attention is Jenny Solares, or @es_jenny_solares on Instagram.

Jenny Solares is here with the relatable content we all want.

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A post shared by Jenny • Sad Girl (@es_jenny_solares)

The Guatemalan content creator knows what the people want to see. How many times have you heard someone say that they like a woman who can eat? Well, as Jenny urges, prove it, y’all. Take your lady out and get her all of the food that she wants. Let’s go!

Now, that’s how you add salsa to someone’s food. If you didn’t already think this way when adding salsa to your tacos, you definitely will now. It’s just impossible not to.

We also love seeing her collaborating with Estefania Saavedra, a fellow Latina creator. A rising tide lifts all boats so we appreciate seeing these Latinas working together.

Solares is even creating brand new identities.

Cholas will forever have a place in our hearts. We know cholas. We love cholas. We are related to cholas. Solares’ creation of the glola is truly a work of art. Just because you’re a chola doesn’t mean you can’t love glitter and colors.

She’s even got some of the Covid humor in check.

There are going to be so many school assignments about this year in the coming years. Kids will be learning about the time the world stood still as we battled an out-of-control virus. It is going to be us having to tell the little ones about that time and it’s going to be rough. Get ready to reliving everything we have been dealing with for the last year.

On top of all of the comedy, Solares is ready to show her fans some real love for their support.

“Thank you all for letting me be me. Thank you for appreciating my silliness, my craziness, my songs, my dances, my imperfections,” Solares tells her fans in a year-end video. “Thank you for letting me be myself. This year was full of so much sadness, uncertainty, frustration, and, for a lot of people, loneliness. Thank you all for not letting me feel that loneliness.”

Thank you, Jenny. Your comedy has been a bright spot for so many during an incredibly hard and sad year.

READ: Instagram Fitness Gurus To Follow For Your 2021 Goals

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Latina Chef and TV Personality Alejandra Ramos Is Tired of Getting Racist, Sexist Body-Shaming Comments From Viewers

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Latina Chef and TV Personality Alejandra Ramos Is Tired of Getting Racist, Sexist Body-Shaming Comments From Viewers

Courtesy NBC News

As a woman on the planet, we’re often subject to unwanted comments about our bodies. Often, people cloak their comments in “concern”. We may be “giving people the wrong idea” or “distracting” others with the way our bodies look. And if you’re a woman of color, as TV chef Alejandra Ramos writes, this criticism is more intense.

As a woman of color, people often fetishize and other-ize our bodies. Clothing that might be appropriate and “normal” on a white body becomes downright dangerous on yours. This is especially true if you are more curvaceous.

On Tueday, chef and TODAY show contributor Alejandra Ramos wrote an emotional piece venting her frustration at the body-shaming comments viewers make about her body.

The comments Alejandra Ramos receives often have both sexual and racialized undertones. After a successful TODAY show segment where Ramos presented a fun recipe on sheet pancakes, her feelings of accomplishment were quickly dampened by negative feedback she got about the way her body looks on camera.

“I’m sure NBC execs were frowning during the segment,” someone tweeted at her. “Suggest you wear more appropriate attire next time you appear on a U.S. channel, especially when you appear on a premiere show like Today. I want to see more of your recipes on air with a little less of your figure.”

And this hateful comment was just one of many racist, body-shaming comments that Alejandra Ramos received from disgruntled viewers.

Ramos received a myriad of other racist, body-shaming criticisms about her appearance. “You are not working in Spanish television where women’s fashion is more revealing than American,” said another person. “Do we have to look at your body?” wrote someone else.

The issue, apparently, was the dress that Ramos was wearing: a flowing, citrus-orange A-line dress with a V-neck that revealed some of her décolletage.

These criticisms stand out because they have overt racist and sexist undertones. These critics highlighted the fact that Alejandra Ramos was other–a Latina in a white space.

“The real issue was that, as a vibrant, curvy, Latina woman, I was thriving and being celebrated in a space that rarely makes room for people who look like me,” wrote Ramos on a powerful op-ed for TODAY.

Ramos explained in her op-ed that people have made negative, racialized comments about her body not only throughout her career, but throughout her life.

“I was always darker, curvier, chubbier and frizzier than everyone else around me,” she explained. By the time she was 11-years-old, adults were making negative comments about her body, sexualizing her, telling her to “cover up”.

“Sometimes the comments do come from a good place, however misguided”, Ramos wrote, “but more often than not, they’re words of control and racism.”

“Styles, outfits and body shapes that are praised and celebrated on white bodies are judged differently on people of color.”

Ramos revealed that a white, thinner friend of hers wore an almost identical dress to hers in a different cooking segment and got none of the body-hate that Ramos did.

Luckily, instead of withering under the criticism, Ramos is using it as an opportunity to thrive. By showing up in her curvaceous, Latina body with pride, Ramos is showing other women and young girls of color that their bodies are normal and worthy.

“To the woman who wrote to me after my segment: I know that kids are watching — and I’m glad they are,” she concluded her op-ed. “I hope many of them are girls like I once was, and that seeing me on TV makes them realize that no matter what anyone says to them, they are good and valued and worthy of anything they dream of.”

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