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Jennifer Lopez’s Words About Not Wearing Hoops While Holding A Baby Is The PSA We’ve Always Needed

Jennifer Lopez AKA actress, singer, dancer, producer, businesswoman, fashion designer, fashion icon AKA Hoop Queen returned to the SNL stage after a decade. This time, while boasting about her beauty and brains she also hilarious made fun of her life-long obsession with hoops. 

In the most hilarious sketch from the SNL episode, Lopez made jokes about our love for hoops.

SNL / NBC

Starring as Gino’s Girlfriend, Lopez played the owner of a store with Melissa Villaseñor as Her Cousin. In the sketch the pair do an ad for massive gold hoops that are so luxurious they’ll “turn your ears the color of money.”

In the fun sketch, Lopez is dressed like a more played up Bronx version of herself as she sells jewelry that says, “I fight other women.”  According to Lopez, as Gino’s Girlfriend, the hoops (as we all know) can be worn just a bout anywhere including birthday dinners, anniversary trips, an ex-boyfriend’s wedding, interviews about women on the street with subway problems, confront Barbara, accusing Barbara, crawling back to Barbara and Saturday Mass. The skit jokes that you can wear them to. Christening and just about everyone will think you look like a “rapper’s accountant.” 

The sketch even made fun of our propensity for putting words in a hoop. 

SNL / NBC

Jabbing fun at our nameplate earrings and vanity necklaces, the Jennifer Lopez skit hilariously featured earrings with names, descriptions, and places on them. The hilarious descriptions of the lot included “diabetic,” and mistakenly created brands like “Couch” for Coach and “DKNYPD” for DKYN. 

The entire sketch, and J.Lo, proved to be a joke machine with the best nod to J.Lo’s Bronx roots.

Watch the full sketch here.

Our No. 1 Boricua, Jenny from the Block, has been an icon through the ages for winning in the music, movie and fashion industries. Rumors swirled around her insuring her signature booty for a over a million dollars back in the 2000’s, but how have we not acknowledged her incredible locks that deserve a policy of its own.

While she’s known for her long waves, J.Lo has never been afraid of mixing it up over the decades. Get ready for the throwbacks.

1. The Classic J.Lo Look

 @creativehairtools / Instagram

This iconic, tousled wavy, waist-length look wouldn’t be complete without her subtle highlights and the way Lopez makes it look so effortless. I’ve tried to get this look. It is a feat.

2. Big Curls, Little Bob.

 “Voluminous Curls” Digital Image. Allure. 28 May 2018.

J.Lo brought it back to the 1920s by creating a side part, getting in some wide curls and tousling with lots (and lots) of hair spray. How she looks so perfect all the time, we can only guess at.

3. The Sleek Topknot.

 “The Topknot.” Digital Image. Allure. 28 May 2018.

We have all experienced the pain of our mothers combing our hair back into the tightest possible ponytail. According to my mom, it’s a two-fer: a proper hairdo and a way to pull your forehead back and prevent wrinkles. Jennifer keeps it in place with a neat topknot for a sleek, elegant look.

4. The Latina Faux Hawk.

 “The Faux Hawk” Digital Image. Allure. 28 May 2018.

There are faux hawks and then there are Latinx faux hawks. Our faux hawks have more volume and should give you an extra 5-7″ in height. J.Lo does it best.

5. The Loose Slick Back.

 “The Slick Back” Digital Image. Allure. 28 May 2018.

Please note that in order to achieve any of these looks, you will need a good hair gel and a tiny comb. Probably also your own personal hair dresser, if you want to be like J.Lo.

6. The Tight Curl Mid-Part.

 Pinterest

The only way to complete this look is with a chain-neck, metal sheet halter top and butterfly clips to pull back the part. Take me back to the ’90s.

7. The Bandana ‘N Braids Look.

 “[IMG]” Digital Image. The Coli. 28 May 2018.

J.Lo rocked this look at the 2000 MTV Music Awards.

Here’s how to get it: Your hair has to be half-up, half-down, to make your ponytail look longer, and you must be wearing braids to pull this off. A starched headband is also preferable. Also, hoops like J.Lo’s.

8. The Hide Your Hair to Show Off Your Face Look.

 “A Dazzling Headscarf” Digital Image. Allure. 28 May 2018.

When you’re Latina, you can pull this off. When you’re J.Lo, you can get a matching headscarf to go with your sparkly, taupe suit.

9. The Deep Brunette Perm.

 Bewitching Vibe / Pinterest

The early ’90s obsession with deep brown, curly hair was glorious for many Latinas. That baby face rocked it well.

10. Caramel Highlights.

 Untitled. Digital Image. Cosmopolitan. 16 May 2018.

#NeverForget the era of caramel highlights. Our moms did it by squeezing lemon juice in our hair, and the occasional kool-aid for a red tint. J.Lo *might* have used a professional.

11. The 50-Inch Hair Extensions.

 @laurielainehair / Instagram

J.Lo doesn’t usually need to do much to her hair to stun the red carpet, but at this year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards, her iconic hair went past her iconic butt.

12. It grew when she went on stage to perform “Inches.”

 @kayla_jlover / Instagram

ICYMI, the next Billboard Music Award she attended, she wore a $100 bill on her fingernails.

13. Beach Waves.

 @kayla_jlover / Instagram

When your hair is this long, you can give yourself a beach wave look and lose hardly any length. J.Lo smoky eye and glossy lips really glam this look up from beach-ready, to runway-ready TBH.

14. The Side Part.

 @jlo.xox9 / Instagram

This is a look circa the ’90s.

15. The Updated Side Part.

 @kayla_jlover / Instagram

J.Lo let her tresses down loose and wavy, while slicking back just a single side part to show off her face, and earrings. This look is so uniquely elegantly Latina, we think she should trademark it.

16. The Half-Up, Half-Down Topknot.

 @kayla_jlover / Instagram

Meet my daily look (minus 20″ of hair). It’s a mix of a tight, full-face slick back that gives you an up-do and casual look all in one sweep. No fake hair accessories needed for J.Lo.

17. Bring on the volume.

 @kayla_jlover / Instagram

With a dark lipliner to frame her lips, how can she not frame that face with a deep, hairspray-induced voluminous look that can’t be beat.

18. The High Pony.

 @jlo_elo / Instagram

Iconic. Nobody does it better. The look is nothing without a pair of modern hoops, and a teased pony.

19. The Ultra-High Pony.

 @headkandi / Instagram

With the hair wrapped around the band at the top and wide, loos curls splaying out. I have a feeling this is a half-up, half-down look to add more volume, too.

20. The Short-Term Perm.

 @jlo_elo / Instagram

J.Lo was feelin’ herself with this look, that’s for sure. It’s fun, it’s light and J.Lo is taking it seriously.

21. The Full Slick.

 @fashionstreet_world / Instagram

J.Lo’s Met Gala look this year was a fierce lob. She slicked her hair behind the ear to show off her earrings, and topped it off with a side part. J.Lo

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JLo Is In Hot Water For Her Lyrics In New Song With Maluma After She Calls Herself ‘La Negrita’

Entertainment

JLo Is In Hot Water For Her Lyrics In New Song With Maluma After She Calls Herself ‘La Negrita’

Focus On Sport / Getty Images

One of the few highlights we’ve had amid this unprecedented year of trauma has been the music industry. From Maluma and Cardi B to Bad Bunny’s surprise albums, we’ve been blessed with some of the best songs ever. Plain and simple.

Despite the global pandemic, many singers have managed to stay busy and put out new tracks. Maluma and Jennifer Lopez are no different as the duo are working on music for their upcoming movie project, Marry Me.

However, the one of the tracks from the upcoming film isn’t getting the type of reception that JLo had likely counted on.

Jennifer Lopez is facing criticism for calling herself a “Little Black girl from the Bronx” in her new track with Maluma.

Despite the pandemic putting the breaks on so many aspects of the entertainment industry, Jennifer Lopez has managed to keep herself busy with new projects. One of her most hyped projects has got to be her collaboration with Maluma on the upcoming film, Marry Me.

In anticipation of the film’s release on Valentine’s Day 2021, the pair have released two new tracks that will also be in the movie’s soundtrack. However, the most recently released song, “Lonely,” isn’t getting the attention that neither JLo or Maluma had likely hoped for.

In the lyrics for the song, which JLo sings with Maluma, Lopez sings “yo siempre seré tu negrita del Bronx” (I’ll always be your Black girl from the Bronx). Obviously, that lyric is causing loads of controversy and fans and critics alike are letting Lopez know they’re out OK with it.

Many are taking issue with the lyrics because “Jenny From The Block” has never really claimed or referenced herself as Black in the past. So why now? And why use an outdated term that’s incredible insensitive to the Afro-Latinx community.

Negrita is a questionable Spanish term that should definitely be phased out amid Spanish-speakers.

Many people are taking issue with the lyrics because they include the controversial term negrita, which is really an outdated Spanish-language term that’s often used as a term of endearment to describe people who are dark-skinned.

It’s a common nickname among Spanish-speakers but it should be phased out of the Spanish language as it’s extremely insensitive to Afro-Latinos.

Both fans and critics have called out Lopez on Twitter.

Fans were obviously confused as to why Jennifer would describe herself as ‘Black’. 

‘Maybe if she said brown girl she coulda gotten away with it,’ one fan said.  Another commented on social media: ‘This is so insulting as an actual black woman.’ 

‘I heard the song and I was like “what she just say? Rewind that. cause she definitely not Afro Latina,’ one fan said. 

However, many others from the Latina community weighed in to explain that while the translation of ‘negrita’ literally means ‘black girl’, it’s not used in that sense. 

‘If your hispanic or latino you know what she means. yes it sounds weird asf the literal translation but that’s not what she means,’ one fan explained.  They continued: ‘As far as I know it’s like a term of endearment for darker complexion within the community. I think she should have not used it being that not everyone would get it and in my opinion her skin isn’t even considered dark. Plus with the times we are in like let’s do better.”

This isn’t the first time the singer has come under fire for insensitive actions around race.

Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time that Jennifer Lopez has been called out for appropriating Black culture, but this is the first time that she’s facing such a major backlash.

Jennifer Lopez has proudly claimed her identity as a Puerto Rican woman but she’s never claimed Black ancestry or self-identified as an Afro-Latina – so her use of the term is troubling.

In the 2001 hit remix of “I’m Real” with Ja Rule and Ashanti, JLo sang along to the N-word slur and faced a similar backlash then. She ended up going on The Today Show to claim that the lyrics were written by Ja Rule and were “not meant to be hurtful to anybody.” She went on to say that “for anyone to think or suggest that I’m racist is really absurd and hateful to me.”

Then there was the whole debacle from this year’s Super Bowl halftime show (which feels like a lifetime ago!) when many criticized her and Shakira for performing for a franchise that didn’t support the Black Lives Matter movement.

Hopefully, this incident on JLo’s part will bring with it a discussion about the term negrita and we can finally eliminate it as a ‘playful nickname’ in the Spanish-speaking community.

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Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Entertainment

Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Vampires vs. The Bronx

Over the weekend, to kick off the start of October, streamers unleashed a whole new slate of movies and series to binge while in isolation. To celebrate the Halloween season, most of the films and series are creep-related, drawing from some of our greatest everyday fears as All Hallows’ Eve content is often wont to do.

Using one of the scariest modern-day realities, Netflix’s newest film Vampires vs. The Bronx digs into one of the world’s scariest concepts: gentrification!

Ahh!!

Netflix’s newest movie, Vampires vs. The Bronx, follows three teenage boys fighting to save their neighborhood from bloodsucking gentrifiers.

The horror comedy film was written and directed by “Saturday Night Live” film segment director Osmany Rodriguez. You might know the director from his work on hysterical shorts for SNL including 2018’s “Complicit” which starred Scarlett Johansson as Ivanka Trump. Rodriguez also wrote the series’ faux Levi’s Woke commercial which featured Ryan Gosling, Pete Davidson, Leslie Jones, and Kenan Thompson.

According to Deadline, “Vampires vs. The Bronx” watches as “gentrification from an unlikely and deadly source creeps into the Bronx, a group of teenage friends rally to save the beloved local bodega and fight against a supernatural force intent on taking over their home at all costs.”

The new film takes audiences into the treasures of a neighborhood like The Bronx (like local bodegas and block parties) while introducing its worst nightmares (rocketing real estate prices, kale, and strange new business concepts).

So far, the film which was released on Oct. 2, has received rave reviews.

Speaking about the new Netflix pic, film reviewer RogerEbert.com describes the film as an observation of gentrification “for what it is—a form of white supremacy—and makes it an unmistakable evil, in which the pale monsters try to demoralize the residents by referring to the Bronx as ‘somewhere where no one cares when people disappear.'”

The best part? The new horror-comedy blasts us with all of the Latinidad.

With references to Sammy Sosa, characters who make up the full spectrum of U.S. Latin Americans (including Afro-Latino, and Haitian) this one seems like a classic in the making!

Check out the trailer below!

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