Fierce

These Sisters Built The Country’s First 100% Ethically Made Business All For Their Brother

All For Ramon was born out of two sisters’ desires to honor their brother’s life.

When Rocio and Diana Ramon’s brother Juan was diagnosed with cancer, the two sisters had to step up to the plate and fill his shoes in helping with the family business. Ultimately their willingness to help their family and show up for their brother led them to a path of entrepreneurship.

After Rocio and Diana Ramon’s brother Juan was diagnosed with brain cancer their father came to them to ask for help.

At the time, the sisters’ father went to Rocio and asked her if she would be willing to take on their brother’s role at the company, who had been highly involved in the business. “I always dreamt of coming to help [my dad] at the factory,” Rocio told FIERCE in the latest episode of “Las Jefas.”

While of course, working for her family had always been her dream, Rocio explained that initially, her work was far from ideal. After all, she’d just lost her brother, and before he had passed away, he’d built up quite a reputation for himself. Rocio says, that expectations for her work were high and when she started working she was pretty much thrown to the wolves.

The wolves being the male-dominated environment in which our brother had been in charge of.

“In this industry, it’s male-dominant so I was here young and a woman so men would come here and see me they would look at me and be like ‘what are you doing here?’” Rocio told us during her interview, before going on to explain that she was ready for this kind of challenge. “I’m like ‘Yes! I’m the boss. This Latina girl is gonna tell you what to do, so you’re gonna have to listen.”

With so much work on her plate, Rocio says that when her younger sister offered to come and help her, she was thrilled.

Diana, who joined the company after her brother’s death to help Rocio says that she came to the decision to work at the factory out of a desire to help and also to grow. “I came to the decision that I had to make a sacrifice to put all of my mind in my creativity– to something that I knew was going to flourish and blossom into something beautiful and I had this dream to do something big,”

Eventually, Rocio and Diana Ramon went on to build their own brand.

The two are now the two founders of the first clothing brand to manufacture designs and clothing that are 100% ethically handmade in the U.S.

“I had just this dream to do something big, so I decided to continue this beautiful journey with All For Ramon with my sister because I know that its something beautiful because I have so much pride in it. “

The clothing brand, which specializes in tie-dye tees, relies on policies and a culture that is strongly rooted in their family values and appreciation of the American dream.

“What I say [about All For Ramon] is bueno, bonito, and ethical because being ethical and transparent is what we learned,” Rocio says before her sister adds that “Quality is not just an expecation it’s the rule for us.”

Today, the two sisters can agree that All For Ramon is more than just a clothing brand to them. Diana says that when it comes to every choice that they make they consider their brother Juan. “Everything that we do for this brand, from choosing the fabrics to picking out the colors, from developing what we’re going to develop in the future it’s like ‘okay what would my brother think about this?'”

While focusing on building their eco-friendly brand, the two sisters have a dream to inspire others as well.

“We want to highlight and educate to Latinos that [they] deserve quality,” says Diana. And when it comes to giving advice to Latinas. Their joint message is clear. “Now’s the time for you to shine and you can shine girl. Shine.”

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Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Entertainment

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Oli Scarff / Getty

Imposter syndrome. It may happen when you finally got accepted to college and have found yourself overwhelmed by the student body, or when you accepted that dream job, or even while doing your job. It can happen in relationships, in friendships. Basically anywhere and amongst us Latinas too. Even despite our hard work and much-earned credentials.

We wanted to talk about Imposter’s Syndrome and how to deal with it, so we reached out to our FIERCE audience on Instagram for their thoughts.

Latinas got real with their responses about feeling as if they were undeserving.

Check them out below!

Remind yourself that you’ve worked hard and are deserving.

“Thank you for posting this! I actually just got hired on as a school counselor and I’m feeling this intensely right now. I have to keep reminding myself that I worked so hard for this and that I AM WORTH IT!” – adelitafamania

Understand that anything can trigger it.

“It happens to me every single day on so many levels. It’s been holding me back my whole life and I keep pushing against it, some days it gets the better of me but I won’t give up on myself even when I really feel I’m not capable. I get so stressed all the time thinking someone is going to discover that I’m not smart, or fun, or whatever it is at that moment that I shut down. It’s so good to openly discuss it with friends or even professional help.” – pinatapink

And it can lead to social anxiety.

“This is so hard, I feel like this nearly every day. Lately, it’s been getting in the way of my entire purpose and whether or not I want to work hard at all. I tend to think, “Like for what? I don’t deserve to have the things I want because I didn’t work hard enough.” Yet, I did. Probably more than anyone else in my programs, jobs, teams, even my friend group. This is so tough and often it leads to my social anxiety which affects a whole multitude of behavioral patterns like procrastination and chronic lateness.” –curlsofroses

But you can battle it by not shrugging off your achievements.

“Happens to me all the time. And when people give me praise I tend to say “oh it’s not a big deal.” But I’m trying to remember that I’m enough and hell yeah I’m a big deal.” – erika_kiks18

Because it can happen to brain surgeons and Fortune 500 CEOs too.

“Our country and our community has been through a lot since the middle of March. Now more than ever is the time to nourish our goals and inspirations. In my podcast, I bring together some of the highest achieving Latinos that our country has to offer: Dr. Quinoñes-Hinojosa: who went from migrant farm worker to a world-renowned brain surgeon
Hector Ruiz: one of the very few Latinos to be a Fortune 500 CEO of an American Company Louis Barajas: the #1 financial Latino expert in the USA. (He is most likely your favorite Reggaeton artist’s to-go financial guy.)
Cesar Garcia: an actor who has seen. dozens of times in music videos, shows, and movies. He’s known for his roles in Fast and Furious and Breaking Bad. Chef Aarón Sánchez: The most well-known Latin Chef in the country. Find an episode that catches your attention or share an episode to a friend of loved one that would like to hear from other Latinos on how they achieved their dreams and goals.” – trailblazinglatinospodcast

And you can cure it by not reminding yourself to not give weight to other people’s thoughts.

“I cured mine by not giving a fck! The enemy is a LIEEEE.” –stephaniesaraii

And last but not least, know that it can be hard to defeat but you ARE worthy.

“This was me on the first day after I transferred to University. The feeling still follows me sometimes. It hard to defeat.” – dianalajandre

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Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

Things That Matter

Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

partyshopavenue / ashantiheadwraps / Instagram

Black and Afro-Latino businesses are crucial to the growth of wealth within their communities. Latinas are the fastest-growing population of entrepreneurs. Here is a list of Black and Afro-Latino businesses you can support to help build them up.

Cafe Con Libros

Cafe Con Libros is a feminist bookstore and coffee shop serving the Brooklyn area with conversations about things that matter to the community. Though they are closed because of COVID-19, there are several ways you can continue to support the bookstore.

Azteca Negra

Azteca Negra is a textile, jewelry, and accessories line that is all about being culturally conscious. Marisol Catchings, the artist behind Azteca Negra, is a Black/Chicana artist living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Catchings also aims at recycling by reusing resources to create her products.

Kimpande Jewelry

Kimpande Jewelry is telling the history of African life and people in Puerto Rico. Eduardo Paz, the designer of the products, wanted to highlight the different African cultures brought to Puerto Rico during the slave trade. The brand is all about buying a piece of history with every piece of jewelry.

Marisel Herbal Bath & Body

Based in Puerto Rico, Marisel Herbal Bath & Body is giving people herbal and natural alternatives to the bath and body products on the market. The store, which has been dealing with the COVID-19 lockdowns, is slowly coming back to life and is offering to ship orders to customers.

Ankhari Crochet

There is something so fun about crochet. It might be that it makes us think about the vintage clothing that we have seen in our parents’ photos. It is fun, stylish, and the colors really giving us some life right now.

Ashanti Headwraps

If you are looking for some new and fun headwraps, this is the place to check out. The brand has stores in Puerto Rico and New York and the stores offer up some beautifully crafted headwraps that anyone can wear.

Pensar Africa

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Fatima – in traceable, ethically made Swag 😷😍💚 . . . Matching mask, Fanny pack and Headwrap available by custom order. DM for more information ℹ️ . . Prevention is better than cure 🦠 😷 . . Local Puerto Rican designer Sanel @disenador_sanelrivera and Pensar Africa have worked together to produced these beautiful masks to protect yourself and others from the spread of Corona Virus – best protection and prevention is to observe social distancing by staying at home but if you need to go out CDC recommends wearing a mask with two layers of tightly woven 100 percent cotton fabric. . . We have created these beautiful reversible, washable mask using high tread count pure Tanzanian 🇹🇿 cotton fabric with pellon interfacing in between for a filter. It also has a pocket to add additional filter if you choose to do so. . . Limited quantity and available in San Juan for drive through pickup only and shipped worldwide 🌍 🌎 . These masks have been disinfected, aired out, packed and ready to go. . . Fanny pack in collaboration with @jashbags . . #facetimephotoshoot with @jorlyfloress #Teamwork #togetherwecan #socialdistancing #coronavirus #protection #protectionisbetterthancure #cdcrecommendation #wearamask #stayathome #coronachronicles #protectivestyles #pensarafrica #sanelriveradiseñador #mask #facemask #santurce #sanjuan #sanjuanpuertorico #puertorico #africanprint #africanfabric #kitenge #ankaramask #africanprintmasks #afroboricua #afrolatina

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Pensar Africa is more than a place to buy things, it is a place to empower African creators. According to the website, Pensar Africa’s mission is to bring African goods to the Americas while providing the creators the opportunity to make money off of their products.

The Salvi Vegan

This food blogger is showing how you can take your favorite Salvadoran dishes and make them vegan. It is a nice reminder that not all support has to cost something. Some times you just have to show support to help those in the community attract opportunities that come with money.

Party Shop Avenue

This is one company we should keep in mind after this is all over. Who doesn’t want a nice balloon structure at their party? These are truly some beautiful pieces of art that you can use to celebrate just about anything.

READ: This Boricua Is Bringing An Indie Bookstore To Her Neighborhood Of 1.4 Million

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