Fierce

These Sisters Built The Country’s First 100% Ethically Made Business All For Their Brother

All For Ramon was born out of two sisters’ desires to honor their brother’s life.

When Rocio and Diana Ramon’s brother Juan was diagnosed with cancer, the two sisters had to step up to the plate and fill his shoes in helping with the family business. Ultimately their willingness to help their family and show up for their brother led them to a path of entrepreneurship.

After Rocio and Diana Ramon’s brother Juan was diagnosed with brain cancer their father came to them to ask for help.

At the time, the sisters’ father went to Rocio and asked her if she would be willing to take on their brother’s role at the company, who had been highly involved in the business. “I always dreamt of coming to help [my dad] at the factory,” Rocio told FIERCE in the latest episode of “Las Jefas.”

While of course, working for her family had always been her dream, Rocio explained that initially, her work was far from ideal. After all, she’d just lost her brother, and before he had passed away, he’d built up quite a reputation for himself. Rocio says, that expectations for her work were high and when she started working she was pretty much thrown to the wolves.

The wolves being the male-dominated environment in which our brother had been in charge of.

“In this industry, it’s male-dominant so I was here young and a woman so men would come here and see me they would look at me and be like ‘what are you doing here?’” Rocio told us during her interview, before going on to explain that she was ready for this kind of challenge. “I’m like ‘Yes! I’m the boss. This Latina girl is gonna tell you what to do, so you’re gonna have to listen.”

With so much work on her plate, Rocio says that when her younger sister offered to come and help her, she was thrilled.

Diana, who joined the company after her brother’s death to help Rocio says that she came to the decision to work at the factory out of a desire to help and also to grow. “I came to the decision that I had to make a sacrifice to put all of my mind in my creativity– to something that I knew was going to flourish and blossom into something beautiful and I had this dream to do something big,”

Eventually, Rocio and Diana Ramon went on to build their own brand.

The two are now the two founders of the first clothing brand to manufacture designs and clothing that are 100% ethically handmade in the U.S.

“I had just this dream to do something big, so I decided to continue this beautiful journey with All For Ramon with my sister because I know that its something beautiful because I have so much pride in it. “

The clothing brand, which specializes in tie-dye tees, relies on policies and a culture that is strongly rooted in their family values and appreciation of the American dream.

“What I say [about All For Ramon] is bueno, bonito, and ethical because being ethical and transparent is what we learned,” Rocio says before her sister adds that “Quality is not just an expecation it’s the rule for us.”

Today, the two sisters can agree that All For Ramon is more than just a clothing brand to them. Diana says that when it comes to every choice that they make they consider their brother Juan. “Everything that we do for this brand, from choosing the fabrics to picking out the colors, from developing what we’re going to develop in the future it’s like ‘okay what would my brother think about this?'”

While focusing on building their eco-friendly brand, the two sisters have a dream to inspire others as well.

“We want to highlight and educate to Latinos that [they] deserve quality,” says Diana. And when it comes to giving advice to Latinas. Their joint message is clear. “Now’s the time for you to shine and you can shine girl. Shine.”

Not One Of The U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Players Is Latina, Here’s Why

Entertainment

Not One Of The U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Players Is Latina, Here’s Why

@downtownlasoccerclub

On July 7, the U.S. Women’s National Team went up against the Netherlands Women’s National Team for the FIFA Women’s World Cup and USWNT took home the championship cup. During the team’s victory speech in New York, U.S. women’s soccer star and forward, Megan Rapinoe, said, “We got white girls, black girls, and everything in between.”

However, Rapinoe should have thought twice before making that statement. After all, what exactly did she mean by “everything in between” if the U.S. Women’s National Team didn’t feature a single Latina woman on its roster this year?

Rapinoe’s comments recently inspired a Los Angeles Times story about an L.A. girls soccer club trying to make the face of women’s soccer.

Columnist Bill Plaschke spoke to young soccer players from the Downtown Los Angeles Soccer Club, whose team is mostly made up of Latina athletes “facing economic and cultural battles that have long kept them on the soccer sidelines.” The Downtown Los Angeles Soccer Club is made up of 175 girls trying to change the face of women’s soccer that has historically been dominated by white women. 

“That’s why …. I like watching [the U.S. Women’s national team] and everything, but I still say my idol is Lionel Messi,” said 15-year-old-striker Nayelli Barahona

This critique of the U.S. Women’s National Football Team is not new. When they also held the title for world champions in 2017, NPR’s Latino USA published an article “Why Is Women’s Soccer so White?” 

Audio producer and journalist Michael Simon Johnson writes, “The United States women’s national soccer team is far from a beacon of diversity, especially when compared to their male counterparts. With few women of color––and no Latinas––the team is extremely white, in spite of soccer’s entrenched place in Latin American culture.” 

However, the issue isn’t that young girls of color aren’t interested in playing the sport. 

But rather, as NPR notes, “youth soccer’s play-to-play system favors not necessarily the most talented children, but the children of parents who can afford elite clubs’ steep fees.” Club soccer fees run from $2,000 to $5,000 annually, per the Los Angeles Times.

That’s where Downtown Los Angeles Soccer Club comes in. Their club president Mick Muhlfriedel helps run the all-volunteer operation out of a middle school field in Pico-Union. According to Mulhfriedel, “some of the girls contribute $25 a month. Most pay nothing.” 

Since the 1991 World Cup, there have been 12 women of color on the U.S. World Cup or Olympic teams.

According to the Women’s Sports Foundation, 14-year-old girls drop out sports at twice the rate of boys. 

“Add in the lack of diverse role models and access, transportation issues and the cost, the number of obstacles facing girls of color in the game of soccer becomes poignantly evident. Although progress has been slow, there has been progress. It would be remiss to not acknowledge some of the black players who are trailblazing on the field,” writes Stephanie Taylor of Girls Soccer Network.

In September 2018, Hope Solo also penned an opinion piece that focused on what’s wrong when the U.S. women’s soccer teams are dominated by “white girls next door.”

She writes that race was something most people on the teams she played didn’t want to discuss or even acknowledge. 

“Over most of my 20-year career, I hadn’t realized how uncomfortable some teammates were around certain coaches or officials. Most players wanted to represent the US, to be at the Olympics or the World Cup, and they’re proud to be on the team. So they kept quiet. But those conversations with teammates who felt things were off, means race is an issue we need to discuss a whole lot more,” Solo writes. “The numbers are very clear. We need more men and women of color to represent US national teams. So few players of color representing the USWNT means there are great athletes across the country we are ignoring.” 

The Los Angeles Times also cites that according to NCAA reports from 2017-2018, only 8% of female soccer players were Latino women. This is why it’s so important to not only advocate for young Latina athletes but also help mobilize the conversations further surrounding not only gender parity’s in professional sports but also race. 

In the last two years, the Downtown Los Angeles Soccer Club has won three of their eight major tournaments and made it to the finals three other times. This fall, the Los Angeles Times writes that they’ll compete in the prestigious Premier division of the Coast Soccer League and compete in the California Regional League. 

The young Latina soccer players from the Down Los Angeles Soccer Club seem to be resilient soccer players passionate and determined.

More importantly, they seem resolute in their efforts to change the face of future World Cup and soccer matches that take place on a national stage.

Here’s to hoping we see some of these young talented players giving that victory speech or holding the cup in the future. 

This Latina Making Six Figures A Month On Youtube By Making Goo Is Basically The New American Dream

Fierce

This Latina Making Six Figures A Month On Youtube By Making Goo Is Basically The New American Dream

Twenty-five-year-old Karina Garcia has a life that can be seen quite literally as a rags-to-riches story. The Riverside, California native is known on Youtube as the ‘Slime Queen’ and makes when things are going really well an average of two hundred thousand dollars. Once making a living off of tips as a waitress, the Latina now serves 9 million subscribers on her Youtube channel some pretty gooey content, or rather, videos of her producing slime

Garcia started her empire based on an interest she had in goo as a young child.

@karinagarc1a / Instagram

Speaking with ABC news about her life before her lucrative business, the Latina said she grew up in a family of eight in a two-bedroom mobile home. Four years before her fame, she was on a break from college and working as a waitress. “I wasn’t in school. … I had like nothing going for myself,” she told ABC. “I remember thinking, like, ‘What am I gonna do with my life?'”

In an interview with Delish, Garcia says she played with slime as a kid and decided to make some of her own but when she couldn’t find recipes to make some, she started doing her own experimenting and research. When Garcia saw that things were going well for her sister Mayra Isabel Garcia’s own beauty tutorial channel, she decided to give creating one a go too. But hers would be built entirely on slime.

“I used to get a lot of hate for it in the beginning,” Garcia told Delish. “I’d make slime once a week, and people were like, ‘What are you doing? You’re so weird.’ Now, people get it. It’s this sensory thing that’s fun to look at and stress-relieving to play with.”

On YouTube, where tutorials are a dime a dozen, Garcia’s videos grab millions of views.

Garcia most popular video so far sees her create a massive tub of slime in her video “100 Pounds of Slime!”

To date, the video has over 26 million views.

From fluffy slim to glitter slime, the Latina’s youtube channel sets out to experiment with creating all kinds of slime forms.

She’s even put Hot Cheetos in Slime!

Spoiler alert: it’s not edible but it does smell good!

But she’s not just a Youtuber. She’s a businesswoman too.

@karinagarc1a / Instagram

Garcia, who has contributed to getting her parents retired, with more than just the channel. She’s also partnered up with Target to create slime kits with her Crafy City line and has had deals with big brands like Coca-Cola. Today, the Latina has been able to afford to buy her own home, a bedroom of six rooms. She truly does live in a house that slime built.

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