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Women Are Dragging Forever 21 By Their Strappy Yellow Bags For Sending Atkins Diet Bars In Their Bags

Our society is obsessed with diet culture. Often times, the quest for the “perfect summer body” or the most ideal figure can be very damaging to people dealing with weight loss and eating disorders. Further pushing of diet culture makes people negatively reflect on their body image — something that is more likely to create eating and anxiety disorders than to lose weight.

Another example of this ongoing issue popped up recently on Twitter and people are calling it a fatphobic attack on plus-sized women and a dangerous marketing ploy.

In a now-deleted tweet, Forever 21 shopper, Ganiella Garcia, shared that there was an extra item in her recent order from the shop.

Twitter / @wisekatya

She found that the clothing store had added a bonus sample of an Atkins bar to her order. The bars are from the special Atkins lines of low-carbohydrate snacks meant to help one follow the fad Atkins diet.

Garcia was upset and shocked that Forever 21 thought it was a good idea to add these to orders that were going to a plus-sized woman. She told Buzzfeed News about the incident, saying:

“I opened the bag and took the clothes out. Everything was fine. And then when I was trying things on, at the bottom there was a card and there was an Atkins bar in a little bag. It was very insulting, and honestly, I like shopping at Forever 21 — but I don’t feel comfortable buying clothes from a company that thinks I shouldn’t be the size that I am.”

Garcia went to Twitter with her story and soon found that she wasn’t the only one to receive the unwanted diet bar.

Twitter / @jessemarisaelao

Many women came forward to share that they were also recipients of these Atkins diet bars. Most people who experienced this extra item ordered from Forever 21’s plus-sized catalog but some bars ended up in orders sent to straight-sized customers too. This Twitter user shared an image of an order her mother placed. Sure enough, the same lemon Atkins bar is present in her order as well.

This tweet pointed out the dangerous message that is presented by sending unsolicited diet bars to their costumers.

Twitter / @theverbalthing

Twitter user, Samantha Puc, suggested that despite what their sizes may be, sending these bars to unaware customers with eating disorders could cause harm. Something as innocuous as a bar suggesting that they should lose some weight can trigger a bulimic or anorexic episode in someone working to overcome their eating disorder.

She went on to say more about how the clothing industry capitalizes on diet culture:

“Plenty of clothing companies monetize disordered eating and fatphobia to sell products, but this is a new level, Forever 21. Assuming this is a brand partnership with Atkins, is the money worth endangering the lives of your customers?”

Queer and Latinx Fat Story Teller, @MerQueenJude, also posted a response on her Instagram admonishing the clothing company for buying into fatphobic and dangerous marketing ploys at the expense of their customers.

“It is so dangerous to body shame and suggest that someone eat less or go on a diet,” she explained on her Instagram post. “You don’t know their history with food. As someone recovering from an ED, this would’ve set me back so far.”

Another Twitter user echoed Puc’s concern about the potential Forever 21 and Atkins partnership.

Twitter / @bronze_bombSHEL

Twitter user Shelby Ivey Christie pointed out that if this was meant to be a tie-in between the clothing company and the diet brand, it was done in a sloppy and tasteless manner. As she pointed out, the presence of the bars in predominantly plus-sized orders seems discriminatory and is defiantly distasteful.

It didn’t take long for Forever 21 to issue a statement defending themselves and reversing their stance on the diet bars.

Twitter / @TracyClarkFlory

A rep for Forever 21 responded with an official statement regarding the accusations of its costumers:

“From time to time, Forever 21 surprises our customers with free test products from third parties in their e-commerce orders. The freebie items in question were included in all online orders, across all sizes and categories, for a limited time and have since been removed. This was an oversight on our part and we sincerely apologize for any offense this may have caused to our customers, as this was not our intention in any way.”

While we’re glad that the potentially dangerous freebies will not be found in any unsuspecting packages from now on, we hope that Forever 21 learns from this misstep. When it comes to diet information and products, they should never be sent out unsolicited. Making observations about another’s body can have majorly unintended repercussions. Nobody should speak in a potentially negative way about another’s appearance or health. Diet and weight are personal, private and — frankly — no one else’s business.

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Selena Gomez Flaunts Kidney Transplant Scar in Bikini Pic, Says “I feel Confident In Who I Am And What I went Through”

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Flaunts Kidney Transplant Scar in Bikini Pic, Says “I feel Confident In Who I Am And What I went Through”

Selena Gomez won’t hide her scars from the world.

On Thursday, the Mexican American singer-actress posted a photo to Instagram that instantly made headlines. In the photo, she was wearing blue one-piece half-zip bathing suit from her friend’s new swimwear line La’Mariette.

But it wasn’t the bathing suit that turned heads, but the scar that Gomez proudly displayed on her right inner thigh.

In the caption, Gomez opened up about her body-acceptance journey, specifically in regards to the scar she received from emergency surgery after her 2017 kidney transplant surgery.

“When I got my kidney transplant, I remember it being very difficult at first showing my scar,” she wrote in her caption. “I didn’t want it to be in photos, so I wore things that would cover it up. Now, more than ever, I feel confident in who I am and what I went through…and I’m proud of that. T – Congratulations on what you’re doing for women, launching @lamariette whose message is just that…all bodies are beautiful.”

The photo is notable because Gomez’s scar was first captured by paparazzi in 2018 while she was on a boating trip in Australia.

Back then, Gomez didn’t have control over narrative or how her body was presented to the world. But now she does. And a change like that makes all the difference.

Fans immediately praised Gomez’s bravery, adding comments like “You are so strong and powerful” and “Thank you for showing our scars are beautiful and all bodies are beautiful!”

via selenagomez/Instagram

A sufferer of lupus, Selena Gomez has had a long and difficult health journey. In 2017, she received a kidney transplant from her good friend and fellow Latina, Francia Raísa.

Gomez has previously been candid about how grateful she is to Raísa for saving her life. “My kidneys were just done,” Gomez explained in an interview with The Today Show. “That was it, and I didn’t want to ask a single person in my life. The thought of asking someone to do that was really difficult for me. [Raísa] volunteered and did it.”

But the scar that Gomez was displaying in her latest Instagram post was actually the result of an emergency follow-up surgery. According to Raisa, shortly after the kidney transplant, Gomez ruptured an artery. Doctors had to rush Gomez to the operating room to remove a vein in her leg and rebuild a new artery in order to keep the kidney in place.

As of now, Gomez’s body has healed, but as she implied in the caption above, she is still in the process of healing from the emotional trauma that comes with health problems. She truly is an inspiration to us all.

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How Do You Cope When You Think Things Like ‘I Hate My Body’?

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How Do You Cope When You Think Things Like ‘I Hate My Body’?

Julian Finney / Getty

Sadly, and unfortunately, sometimes we unexpectedly catch sight of ourselves and find that we don’t really like what we see at the moment. Whether it’s the shape of our nose, our bodies, or hair, unfair body expectations can wear on us and make us feel ugly one day despite feeling beautiful on other days.

Recently, we stumbled across a Reddit post that asked users how they manage to cope when they have negative thoughts about their bodies. Beyond being helpful, the answers were invigorating.

Check them out below.

Try saying three nice things about yourself each day.

“I look in the mirror and don’t look away until I say 3 nice things I like about my body. Eventually, it became second nature and now I’m vain af.” –not_doing_that

“Ummm… this may not be helpful to you. But to be totally honest with you, what’s helped me more than any sort of self-love type of approach was just realizing that, to be blunt, I have two options: I can either change what I dislike or else accept that it doesn’t matter. I spent years working on my physical self-esteem with, honestly, limited success. At some point, though, I realized that it doesn’t actually matter. I’m not important; details about my appearance are even less important; and me spending time agonizing over it is a pointless self-indulgence. The more I thought about that, the more I found it to be kind of liberating. I’m one person in six billion. Nobody cares about my looks or my self-image but me, and I have other things more worth my time worrying about. I’ve changed a few things I didn’t like. I fixed my teeth, for instance, and I get some Botox and fillers these days. The rest of it, it’s just like… meh, time to move on. I still have my insecurities for sure, but I no longer wallow in them the way I did.” – user

Think of your future self.

“Two things I have adopted in all the many many years of abysmal body image and eating disorders and all that shit:

  1. Remember nobody notices/cares about my “flaws” as much as I do. I am literally deciding their importance. So instead of saying “ugh I’ve got rolls when I sit/my thighs touch because I’m lazy and disgusting and nobody will ever love me,” I can instead start saying “I have rolls when I sit because I have fat in my stomach, which is necessary for my body to function correctly. My thighs touch because that is how my legs look when I am at a healthy weight.” etc etc and then it goes from an assignment of value to just an objective fact about me, like my blood type or my shoe size.
  2. Remember that when I am 80 I am not going to lose sleep over not being 10 lbs lighter or two inches taller or blessed with a nicer bum. I’d be far more likely to regret a pattern of avoiding social situations because I don’t feel pretty enough, or to regret not having many pictures with my loved ones who are gone because my hair was messy or I wasn’t wearing a flattering outfit. Like, I never look at photos of my loved ones and think “damn, she should have avoided the camera, she looks bloated and tired.” I’m like “Oh I remember that trip to visit my auntie, and how good her cooking was, and how cool it was to learn that she loved the same author I did and that conversation we had when I couldn’t sleep and she told me about being my age and I realized she understood me…”

I frequently have to check myself to make sure I’m focusing on the shit that matters and not hiding who I am just because I don’t think the package I come in measures up.” – glorioid

Work hard on making yourself feel happy with yourself in the ways that you can healthily control.

“I’m heavier than I ever was when I hated my looks. These days I think I’m pretty fab, I work hard to be a pretty cool person, and I work reasonably hard to look good and stay in decent shape. I’m nowhere near physically perfect, but I love myself holistically and I figure life is way too short not to eat chocolate, put my butt on display in a pencil dress, and any number of other things my 18-year-old twig of a self would have been mortified about. Turns out there’s more to life than obsessing about how I look in a negative way. If I’m going to obsess about how I look, I at least try and do it in a positive way now. I also realized that if you’re a healthy weight, confident, and well dressed, you’re basically going to be attractive. Perfect is not a requirement in any other area of life so there’s no point making it one of my own.” – grittex

“I remind myself of how incredible the human body is and try to think of the amazing things my body does to keep me alive and let me enjoy the world. Who cares if I don’t look like a model? My heart pumps around 2,000 gallons of blood every day and my bones are as strong as granite. How cool is that? Also, I try to remember that I don’t owe the world attractiveness for daring to exist. It’s not my job to be visually pleasing.” – tomorrowistomato

“It depends on how I hate it. If it’s something about my body screwing up (getting sick, tripping and breaking something, not being tall enough to reach something) I sulk and get over it. I’m lucky enough that my body is mostly healthy (no chronic illnesses to deal with, or things like that) and I have to accept that sometimes it’s not going to cooperate. But when it comes to appearance: I try to remind myself that my looks are just one part of me. I step away from the mirror. I focus on some aspect of my looks that I can control (maybe my face is covered in acne, but I can put my frizzy hair in bun to manage that issue) and ideally try to remember the things I like about my body. While it’s not uncommon for me to look into the mirror and frown at how gross I look (the scowl really doesn’t help), it personally only bothers me for as long as I’m looking at it. So I usually try to make it look a bit better (brush my hair, do makeup, etc.) if I can, or else I just try to focus on something else. I have ADD though, so my attention span doesn’t usually allow me to dwell on it any longer than 2 minutes after I finish looking in the mirror.” –BundleofAnxiety

Stop comparing.

“I stopped judging other people. I grew up in a very judgmental family, struggled with an eating disorder for years, and constantly compared myself to others or even silently picked out things on other people I didn’t like to try to make myself feel better. As soon as I stopped doing that, I felt infinitely better. Instead of thinking “wow, that shirt/dress etc are too for him/her” I thought ” wow, they look good in that color” or “props to them for wearing something they’re told they ‘shouldn’t'”. When I made that change it became easier to apply that same way of thinking to myself.” –hanchan21

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