Fierce

Google Maps Has Been Directing Women In Search Of Abortion Clinics To Anti-Choice Clinics

For many abortion-seekers in rural areas across the country, a search on Google Maps for a clinic where they can obtain the lawful family planning procedure could actually lead them to anti-choice centers that shame them for wanting to terminate their pregnancies. VICE News conducted an investigation into the matter, looking specifically at 55 cities across 22 states that are at risk if Roe v. Wade is overturned. 

In 21 of the cities, the reporters discovered that Google directs users to centers that either do not provide abortions or would attempt to dissuade them from attaining the procedure.

In North Dakota, searching for “Where can I get an abortion in Bismarck, North Dakota” leads users to North Dakota Right to Life, an anti-abortion clinic that, as you might guess, doesn’t offer the procedure.

daredefendourrights / Instagram

Red River Women’s Clinic, which does provide abortions, does not show up in the search. In Tennessee, similar anti-choice centers also populate. However, the Google Maps search also leads to the National Memorial for the Unborn, a site “dedicated to healing generations of pain associated with the loss of aborted and miscarried children.” While it should be noted that some people do regret having an abortion, according to the American Psychological Association, a single first-trimester abortion is no riskier to a woman’s mental health than carrying a pregnancy to term.

Similarly, the search for, “Where can I get an abortion in Little Rock, Arkansas?” offers a combination of family planning centers that do provide abortions, like a Planned Parenthood location, but also generates Arkansas Right to Life, a pro-life organization that’s website states the procedure influences “society’s acceptance of infanticide.”

Additionally, through their study, VICE News found Google Maps results from crisis pregnancy centers that used misleading language about their family planning options or outright shamed abortion-seekers as well as centers that claim to “reverse” a medication abortion using the “abortion pill reversal,” a drug that has not been proven to work. 

Google’s struggle to help give abortion-seekers accurate information isn’t knew.

therealsparklepuffs / Instagram

In February 2018, Gizmodo found that when users search, “Where can I get an abortion near me?” Google Maps directed many of them to “crisis pregnancy centers.” These facilities, while legal, have become largely controversial because they disguise themselves as abortion centers yet shame and counsel people who think they are obtaining the procedure against it. Additionally, they fail at providing “comprehensive, accurate, evidence-based clinical information” and instead try to sway abortion-seekers into believing that becoming a parent or considering adoption are better options for them.

Since that investigation more than a year ago, VICE News notes that Google Maps has gotten better at differentiating between abortion clinics and crisis pregnancy centers, but the problem of sending abortion-seekers to pro-life clinics still remains. 

Google, which is aware of the problem, claims that it exists because pro- and anti-abortion centers usually operate on the same keywords. 

“There are situations in which it can be overt misrepresentation and the business knows what they’re doing. I mean, that’s the purpose of the business,” spokesperson Paul Pennington told the news outlet, referring to misleading crisis pregnancy centers.

He continued: “If you are picking the right business category, if you are — again — being very clear in your website and you say, ‘We do not provide these services, etc.,’ that’s on us.”

That’s why Google deploys human analysts from its fraud and spam team to physically investigate businesses that might be misrepresenting themselves on Maps.

If a business identifies as an “abortion clinic,” a protected category, an additional certification is required from these analysts. 

According to Pennington, the question is, “What is that balance of having something that’s automated and scalable but also maintaining some level of manual labor that really has people kind of going in and reviewing this?”

During its probe, VICE reached out to COPE Pregnancy Center, a clinic that appeared in a Google Maps search for abortion clinics in Montgomery, Alabama but does not provide or refer the procedure.

“That is absolutely insane. We would not do that and certainly didn’t do that, especially today — when it’s, when pregnancy centers have such a bad reputation anyway,” COPE executive director Lorie Mullins said of the inaccurate label, adding that she planned on contacting Google to correct it. “We really fight to be upfront and open about what we are and what we provide, and certainly would not lie.”

However, a Google spokesperson told VICE News that the facility continually applied to be certified as an “abortion clinic.”

They believe that a Google employee must have mistakenly approved them. After VICE flagged the miscategorization to Google, the company said it would fix the problem in 24 hours.

Despite the improvements, problems still persist, leaving some pro-abortion rights groups to take matters into their own hands. For instance, Abortion Access Front has an initiative called exposefakeclinics.com, which encourages supporters to review anti-abortion centers and abortion providers on Google Maps.

“We saw Google reviews as a tool to combat that misinformation,” Anna Bean, the nonprofit’s community engagement manager, told the outlet. “Write a completely accurate review: ‘As a consumer, I see that this place does not provide abortion services.’ As simple as that. So that when people then upvote that review — you know, give it that little thumbs-up — that rises to the top of the page.”

But even this is limited, as anti-choice groups have started their own copycat movement, using Exposefakeclinics.org — instead of .com — to defend anti-abortion centers.

“There’s an influx of these clinics. They’re more empowered than ever before by the Trump administration now,” Bean said. “Google needs to play a role in ensuring that people are getting factual information about the services in their community.”

Read: When Abortion Meets Immigration: How I Help The Undocumented Obtain An Abortion

News Outlets Are Flooded With Terrifying News, But Here’s A List Of Really Good News That Is Affecting Latinx

Fierce

News Outlets Are Flooded With Terrifying News, But Here’s A List Of Really Good News That Is Affecting Latinx

We Are / Getty Images

Every day, television, print, and social media news bombard us with the worst of the world’s major updates and reports. From news of global warming and racism to accounts of mass shootings and political in-fighting, it’s hard to see any good news in these daily publishings. It can get overwhelming and downright depressing. It begins to feel like there is nothing but negativity and bad news in the world. 

However, we know that isn’t true. No matter how bad it seems, there are daily triumphs that we should celebrate as sources of positivity and hope in our world no matter how small these wins seem. We asked our FIERCE readers to share with us some of the good news that is happening in their lives. Hopefully, their stories of success will rejuvenate you and remind you of your own personal victories.

1. Dad deserves some rest and relaxation.

Instagram / @securedretirementradio

“Dad told me today he is preparing to retire in December! This man, like many of our fathers/grandfathers, was up every day at 5 AM working hard to make sure I had everything – now he can relax and let me (try) to make sure he has a nice retirement ❤️” @mianoel18

2. They grow up so fast.

Instagram / @mainan.anaktoys

“My two-year-old started preschool today. The regional center is paying for 2 days. It took a lot of work to get to this point. I’m a single mom ❤️” @xochitl_esperanza

3. An educated Latina.

Instagram / @nataliemcortes

“Graduating with my Ph.D. soon. Proud First-gen Mexicana ❤️ !! ” @ana_kaboom

4. You are worthy of good things.

Instagram / @thecleverbabecompany

“I’m currently applying to medical school and my imposter syndrome was hitting me pretty hard but after my first interview, I’m excited about the rest. (I got interviews at schools I thought would flat out reject me)” @elizpicazo

5. Making her dreams come true.

Instagram / @johnmarkgreenpoetry

“This 43-year-old mother of two just passed her first-year law school exam! Less than 20% of those who take it pass. In three years I’ll be taking the California bar exam! It’s never too late to go after your goals!” @mujerlaw

6. Congrats, you’re a homeowner!

Instagram / @abbieimagine

“Officially done paying my house as of this month 🙏🏼😭🙏🏼😭🙏🏼” @teresasole48

7. A reunion worth waiting for.

Instagram / @donia_artwork

“I haven’t seen my best friend in two years and she bought her plane ticket today to join me for Thanksgiving and I am SO EXCITED 😍😍😍😍”   @katie.i.cannon

8. Pay it forward.

Instagram / @deepalshah01

“A job opportunity at this place I volunteer for opened up and I’m really excited about it. I applied it’s a legal advocate position to help innocent victims of all crime. I just really want to pay it forward and be who I needed when I was younger. I’m just asking for prayers and good vibes this way 🙏🏽”   @pieldecanela__

9. Get that bread, girl!

Instagram / @j.duh

“I am starting my first job after college on Monday! I will help in launching a Latinx outreach program! I am so excited” @bookwormweirdo

10. Support those Latina-owned businesses. 

Instagram / @lovelyeventsbyvon

“My gringo esposo and I started a Paleteria @gringojakespaleteria and we entered a competition to win our own shop with free rent for a year! 👏🏽👏🏽 Even if we don’t win, we’ve learned so much and conquered our fear of public speaking! 💗” @oliviamsal

11. A multitude of blessings.

Instagram / @roccaboxuk

“I just graduated from UW-Madison (just announced #13 public university in the country). I am a first-gen college student so I am so so proud of myself. Still looking for a job (accepting all prayers/good vibes thx 😊). My parents have been looking for their first house for months and are set to close and move in at the end of the month!” @april_rose13

12. So much to be thankful for.

Instagram / @the.sarasa

“I nailed the audition for @tedxevansville and will be speaking about our Latinx community on November 8th! I just moved across the country too, and I both my company and myself are starting new projects and getting more business 🙏🏽❤️ @officiallawtina also my parents are opening the first authentic Latin American restaurant (Serving 9 countries’ foods) in September 17th in a small town where it is finally starting to diversify more and become more inclusive, and this is a HUGE step for the community!” @cindypetrovalfaro

13. Celebrate Latina creators.

Instagram / @weallgrowlatina

“My film @hyphenfilm is hitting the film festivals! Even up for a film star award 🙂 @riaservellon

14. Travel feeds the spirit.

Instagram / @evolution_of_spirit

“My Ma and sis got to travel to Spain 🇪🇸 🙏🏽 We are not rich rich so to us this is Amazing!!!! @jjj259 @essjayyvee 💕 have fun love you!!!” @jayyvee_xo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4n-R07zlz1g

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Culture

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Google

September 22nd marks Doodle Day — yes, it’s a thing! Since 2004 Doodle Day has helped raise funds for epilepsy research. “The tagline ‘Drawing a line through epilepsy’ heads the campaign, and participants take part by submitting their doodle, along with a small donation. The Doodle Day team then judges the doodles and awards prizes accordingly,” according to Days Of The Year

There aren’t many doodles with as much reach as Google doodles, which serve as way to educate and inform people all over the world about global history. Of course, Latinxs have been contributing to arts, science, and culture for centuries. 

Check out these 15 Google Doodles that honor Latinx culture and history. 

Mercedes Sosa

Born in 1936, Argentinian singer Mercedes Sosa was known for being the “voice of the voiceless ones.” Nicknamed “La Negra” her social justice lyrics and traditional folk music allowed her to perform at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, the Sistine Chapel, and the Colosseum in Rome.

Chile’s National Day

The country’s official flag since 1817 commemorates a multiday celebration known as Las Fiestas Patrias to honor Chile’s eight-year struggle for self-determination from Spanish colonial rule. 

Lupicínio Rodrigues

Lupicínio Rodrigues was born in 1914 in Brazil, today his name is “synonymous with the musical genre samba-canção, also known as samba triste or ‘sad samba.’”

Ynés Mexía

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Mexican American botanist and explorer Ynes Mexia received this tribute. In 1925, Mexía traveled to Sinaloa, Mexico to find rare botanical species. On the trip, she fell off a cliff, fractured her hand and ribs, and still managed to return home with 500 species, 50 of which were undiscovered. 

Tin Tan

The actor, singer, and comedian Tin Tan was born in Mexico City in 1915. Tin Tan helped to popularize pachuco culture with films like The Jungle Book and The Aristocats.

Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar

Born in Pamplona, Colombia in 1922, Villamizar was an innovative painter and sculptor. After traveling to Paris and New York in the 1950s to much acclaim, he became a pioneer of abstract Colombian art. 

Ignacio Anaya García

Ignacio Anaya García’ was born in 1895. In 1943, García invented nachos. What more needs to be said about the magnitude of his culinary contributions? Nachos! 

Arantza Peña Popo  

Afro-Columbian artist Arantza Peña Popo made history when she won Google’s “Doodle For Google” contest in 2019. The art entitled “Once you get it, give it back” features two generations of Afro-Latinx mothers and daughters.

Dr. Matilde Montoya

The first female physician in Mexico, born in 1859, Dr. Matilde Montoya petitioned President Porfirio Díaz to be allowed into medical school. Dr. Montoya had already earned her degree as a midwife at 16, but she wanted more. Dr. Montoya paid her success forward. After her application was accepted, she demanded the House of Representatives to change the rules and permanently allow female students into the School of Medicine.

Lucha Reyes

Born into poverty in 1936, Peruvian singer Lucha Reyes beat the odds by becoming one of the country’s most adored singers. Reyes helped to popularize the Afro-Peruvian genre of music música criolla which blended Creole, Afro-Peruvian, and Andean musical traditions.

Evangelina Elizondo

Mexican actress Evangelina Elizondo was born in 1929. She would become a star of Mexican Cinema’s Golden Age. Fun fact: this Google doodle was created by the Mexican guest artist Valeria Alvarez. 

Abraham Valdelomar

Writer and caricaturist Abraham Valdelomar was born in 1888 in Peru. A humorous prodigy, Valdelomar is remembered for his cuentos criollos. In 1916, he founded the literary magazine Colónida, which helped Peruvians discovered fresh literary talent like José María Eguren.

Raúl Soldi  

Argentinian artist Raúl Soldi was born in Buenos Aires in 1905. Soldi was a painter, costume designer, and even did department store windows.

“Recognized in his country and globally, a 1992 retrospective at Argentina’s Palais de Glace attracted some 500,000 visitors and his work was honored with an award at the 1958 Biennale of São Paulo, Brazil.”

Simón Rodríguez  

Venezuela’s Simón Rodríguez devoted his life to educating others. A scholar, philosopher, and teacher born in Caracas in 1771, he would prove to be a precocious student. As a teacher, among his students Simón Bolivar, he proposed creating well-funded, well-trained schools that included students of all ethnicities and social backgrounds. 

Mexican Independence Day

Mexican guest artist Dia Pacheco created this Google doodle to commemorate Mexico’s Independence Day. Inspired by indigenous Mexican crafts and textiles like Oaxacan embroidery and children’s toys, the animated rehiletes are a beautiful homage.