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Documentary About Jenni Rivera Will Address The Sexual Abuse That She And Her Daughters Suffered At The Hands Of Her Ex-Husband

A documentary about the life of beloved Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera is in the works. The film, which according to reports is being developed by Gloria Estefan’s husband Emilio Estefan, will feature unseen concert footage from her final concert.

Rivera, one of the most popular recording artists out of Latina America from this century, died in a 2012 plane crash when she was just 43.

Rivera is the singer of classic songs such as hits such as “Mariposa de Barrio,” ”Paloma Negra” and “De Contrabando.”

During her career, Estefan worked closely with the singer, directing specials that featured her. Now he and television producer Dave Broom of “The Biggest Loser” and “The Day I Met El Chapo” are joining forces with Rivera’s family to produce the film.

Speaking to the Associated Press about the new project, Estefan said “I really want people to know her with the same admiration that I had for her as a human being, and that her fans realize how important her followers, and especially her family, were to her… We had a very beautiful friendship … I met her as a singer, as an actress, but at the same time as a person.”

Both Estefan and Broom have said that they expect to release the film late this year, though it is still unknown whether the film will make its debut in theaters.

Rivera’s sister Rosie has called the film “intimate.”

Speaking to Page Six via email, Rosie Rivera reportedly said that the film be emotion for the singer’s family, including her children, but that it is a necessary project to release.

“It is an intimate night with Jenni,” Rivera reportedly said. “To my sister Jenni, her faith, her family and her fans were everything. Jenni would have wanted to share this moment of her life with the world.”

Estefan says that the film will see Rivera narrate her own story.

“You are going to see something that’s really priceless. You are going to see her in concert again, but above all you will get to know much more and I think you’ll be certainly surprised by many things that are going to come out, told directly by her,” Estefan told Associated Press.

According to Estefan, the film will also include archival material and interview between Estefan and Rivera in which the singer spoke openly about experiencing rape at the hands of her ex-husband who also sexually abuse some of her family members.

In 1992, Rivera divorced her husband José Trinidad Marín, the father of three of her five children. Five years later, Rivera’s sister Rosie revealed that Marín had sexually molested her and that he was doing the same to Chiquis Rivera, the daughter he had with Rivera. A physical exam revealed that he had done the same to their other daughter Jacqueline. A molestation case was opened in 1997 and Marín spent 9 years as a fugitive before he was arrested in 2006, convicted of sexual assault and sentenced to over 31 years in prison.

“Many times women that have been abused or mistreated don’t say anything for fear of being blamed for what had happened to them, but she was always open and she was honest,” Estefan explained in the interview.

According to the producer, it is his hope that Rivera’s film will pay tribute to “women that have been mistreated, that have been deceived, that have been abused.”

Gina Rodriguez Gets Back Into Our Good Graces With Her Latina Representation In 'Someone Great'

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Gina Rodriguez Gets Back Into Our Good Graces With Her Latina Representation In ‘Someone Great’

Rolling Stone

If you have yet to watch the newest rom-com to drop on Netflix, you need to get on it. It will satisfy your craving for laughs, tears, romance, and encourage a deep sense of nostalgia and introspection. ForJane the Virgin” fans waiting for the latest season to become available, this will satiate your love for Gina Rodriguez. She’s the star and a producer. But this Gina is not Jane.

Instead, she is Jenny- a flawed, foul-mouthed, hyper-passionate music writer on the verge of a new phase of life. Jenny has recently broken up with longtime boyfriend Nate (LaKeith Stanfield) after she receives a dream job on the other side of the country. She spends the next day heartbroken, seeking the help of her friends to embark on their last hurrah of their twenties in New York City. There’s booze, there’s drogas, there’s lots of foul language and sex. And yet, the movie never strays from the unconditional love that runs underneath the female friendships and the truths of the time before “real” adulthood hits.

We tend to think of coming of age stories as revolving around a child’s passage to adulthood.

“Ladybird” and “Real Women Have Curves” come to mind. The little birds leave the nest and the fall is painful and liberating. But the same can be said of the return-to-Saturn time of our late twenties when we go from young adulthood to “real” life. This is where we find our primary characters. Friends Jenny, Erin (DeWanda Wise), and Blair (Brittany Snow) have a history that runs all the way back to college. They know each others’ ticks and have kept long receipts.

The movie centers around their struggle to support their friend through the grieving process of a breakup while beginning their own grieving process of saying goodbye to her as she moves to San Francisco.

“Someone Great”/ Netflix

This marks the end of an era and forces the women to look forward to making different life choices that will help them become the people they want to be.

For anyone who’s lived in New York City and moved away, who’s had close friendships they’ve moved away from, or who’ve lost the love they thought was the “one”, this movie will touch a lot of tender areas in ways that are inspiring and fun. It’s a few partsThe Sweetest Thing” with a touch of “Sex and the City” and just the right amount of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” It’s a story about saying goodbye to who you thought you were and moving into who you’re going to be, all while boldly feeling all the emotions that come with loss, change, love, and celebrating yourself.

“Someone Great” meets the needs of a nostalgia film for the modern audience.

“Someone Great”/ Netflix

The three friends are from diverse backgrounds and it’s touching to see the way that years of friendship have allowed their cultures to beautifully blend together. Jenny, who is Latina, interjects Spanglish phrases into casual conversations with her friends when she’s keeping it super real, calling Erin “Mentirosa!” for not owning her own relationship baggage. Erin, who is reluctant to fall in love with her new girlfriend Leah (Rebecca Naomi Jones), is forced to face her fear of intimacy and vulnerability. Blair, who represents the approval-seeker in a lot of us, is learning the value of speaking to her true desires instead of shrinking to please.

It shouldn’t stand out as extraordinary that we see multicultural women of differing sexual identities being friends, but as far as romantic comedies go, it’s rather groundbreaking.

“Someone Great”/ Netflix

We see our characters proudly displaying their “woke” merch. Blair’s favorite coffee mug has “Feminist” written boldly in hot pink and Jenny wears a crop-top reading, “Latina AF” that she receives several compliments on. The truth bomb-laden lines delivered by Wise are especially funny, edgy, and on-point. These are real women who make it a point to stay up on current events and make no apologies for their desires, their word choices, or their right to take up space. As far as coming of age stories for women, this is a new genre entirely.

The movie is only made better by the soundtrack, that rivals “Garden State” for its ability to capture not only the moment at hand but the emotions that run beneath the character arcs.

“Someone Great”/ Netflix

Jenny is seen early on drinking heavily while dancing to “Truth Hurts” by Lizzo. She’s spilling liquor, singing loudly and dancing in her underwear. There is no bra or thigh gap visible on our heroine, but there is sadness, anger, and beautiful, real cellulite. It’s a breath of fresh air, as is the moment when Selena’s “Dreaming of You” comes on in a bodega and pulls Jenny into a trance that makes the friends sing like it’s 1995 and they have their whole romantic lives ahead of them.  Ryn Weaver’s “Reasons Not to Die” captures the feeling of “ride or die” friendship that Jenny reflects on in a forlorn cab ride across the Williamsburg Bridge.

In a time when women are fighting for the right to take up space, women of color specifically, we need films like this one to remind us what “normal” looks like. It’s a fearful, uncertain time before career climaxes, marriage, and motherhood. It’s questioning whether any of those are necessary for a happy and fulfilling life. It’s about people with a variety of identities and backgrounds seamlessly fitting together within the container of friendship. And perhaps at its most gut-wrenching and true note, it’s about the first love and not the last love, revealing the fine line between passion and dysfunction.

For anyone who is looking to reminisce, to look into the mirror and see themselves again at 29, this film feels like it was made for you.

But it was also made for those who are living this truth now, on the edge of what’s next, wondering whether the future will live up to expectation.

“Someone Great”/ Netflix

Jennifer Kaytin Robinson wrote and directed what feels like a love letter to uncertainty and the treasure that can be found in the midst of confusion and companionship. Watch this movie with friends if they’re nearby, or facetime them with a glass of wine after if they’re a phone call away.

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