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Dior Releases Insensitive Indigenous Fragrance Ad Featuring #MeToo Accused Johnny Deep Speaking For An Indigenous Dancer

Update: Dior announced over the weekend that it pulled its campaign for the fragrance Sauvage after complaints of racism.

We honestly thought Dior had learned its lesson. Less than a year after the Parisian brand released an insensitive cultural ad starring Jennifer Lawrence in which she wore Mexican-inspired fashions, the high-luxe company is at it again. Months ago, Dior was completely open about the fact that Dior’s creative director, Maria Grazia Chiuri has a love affair with Mexican culture, and that’s totally okay, but why not celebrate Mexico by using Mexican models?

Now they’re doing it again, but it’s worse.

Dior released a new advertisement for their fragrance Sauvage, and the aesthetic is full-on Native American-themed.

The brand released the images and videos on social media, which shows Indigenous dancer, and member of the Rosebud Sioux tribe,  Canku One Star. The imagery is stunning and vibrant. Canku One Star dances while wearing traditional Native American attire on top of the mountainous plain.

The problem with this is that people haven’t forgotten that Dior is a FRENCH brand ( a country that colonized the North Americas and excessively abused Indigenous people). Also, we haven’t forgotten that tiny part about what the brand did with the Mexican-inspired collection that featured zero Mexican models either.

The brand was already expecting the backlash clearly because, on their Instagram page, they were very particular about their wording.

“An authentic journey deep into the Native American soul in a sacred, founding and secular territory,” they stated on Instagram. “A film developed as a close collaboration between the House of Dior and Native American consultants from the 50-year old Indigenous advocacy organization, @americansforindianopportunity in order to respect Indigenous cultures, values and heritage.

Okay, so they had approval, but then it got worse.

The ad also features the one and only Johnny Depp.

Jean-Baptiste Mondino directs the film that shows Depp wearing his traditional “rock star” look that comes with a cowboy hat, walking around the Canyonlands, in Utah — home to the Utes and Apaches tribes. Depp isn’t alone in the ad because he is being spied on by a Native woman, played by model Tanaya Beatty.

Now, before you freak out, Beatty is actually of Native American descent as well. The Canadian model and actress is part of the Da’Naxda’xw Nation indigenous people of British Columbia, Esquire reports. Then Depp finds a guitar and because he is a musician begins to play portions of a song called “Rumble,” written by Link Wray, who is also a descent of Native American people.

Depp is celebrating Native American culture but just a reminder he is a white man from Kentucky. Even if he was adopted in his later age by a Native American woman.

Yes, Depp’s “adoptive” mother is indeed LaDonna Harris of the Comanche people. La Donna and her daughter, Laura Harris, are the president and executive director of the Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO) organization. They are the same group that was consulted for the ad. However. It is important to note that Depp became adopted as an honorary son by Harris in 2012. The same exact year, and during, his promotion of the controversial film The Lone Ranger, in which he was seen playing the part of an Indigenous person. What’s more, while Depp was adopted by Harris, he was never adopted into, and never became a member of any tribe.

People on social media didn’t seem to care about Depp’s connection to Native people, or that Dior got permission to use Native imagery.

They just want Dior to stop profiting off minority people. Sure, it’s nice Dior attempted to use proper consultations for this ad, their film, and their entire branding. However, is any of the money made from this product going back to Native people at all?

Of course, there had to have been at least one person of color saying stop, right?

Were they too afraid to speak up?

We haven’t even gotten to the fact that the name of the perfume is actually a derogatory word that Native people have often been described as.

Why didn’t the Native consultants say ‘maybe call it something else’?

Did Dior also forget that Depp was awful as a representative of Native people in “The Lone Ranger”?

There a ton of Native male models. We would have loved to have seen any of them.

But let’s see both sides for a second. They did incorporate a lot of authentic Native inclusiveness.

Dior did well with the consultants, and well with the female model and the Native dancer. It was just Depp. He ruined the entire thing. Oh, and the fact that we’re still wondering if Dior is giving a single dollar to Native causes from the earnings of this product. But what do we know? According to People magazine, the Comanche people said Depp is the “perfect embodiment of an intense Sauvage man,” and added that he is after all adopted by the Comanche community.

Watch the entire ad below and let us know what you think.

Update: Dior has deleted all images and video from their social media pages. Guess they learned their lesson.

READ: All Of The Mexicanas In Hollywood Dior Could Have Asked To Represent Their Mexican-Inspired Line That Aren’t Jennifer Lawrence

Appreciate, Don’t Appropriate: We Made A List Of Dos And Don’ts For You To Celebrate Native American Heritage Month Respectfully

Culture

Appreciate, Don’t Appropriate: We Made A List Of Dos And Don’ts For You To Celebrate Native American Heritage Month Respectfully

November is Native American Heritage month. And like most commemorative months dedicated to honoring the culture and history of an oppressed people in the U.S., Native American Heritage Month is an insufficient gesture. Added onto that, November is often a a time when stereotypes of Native people get reinforced. A month of supposed ‘appreciation’ and ‘honoring’ of oppressed communities, can easily turn into one replete with cultural appropriation and prejudice.

So we decided we’d round up a few things that you can do —and not do— to celebrate in a positive and healthy spirit. 

1. Don’t desecrate traditional, sacred Native objects by buying or wearing them as props.

More often than not, we find ‘Native’, ‘Tribal’, or ‘Navajo’ inspired goods in stores, what you might not know is that they could be sacred Native artifacts and spiritual items. Objects like the canupa pipe or a warbonnet —commonly known as ‘headdress’— are part of Native spiritual culture and they should never be worn as a costume.

For Native people, practicing their spirituality was illegal in this country, up until the passage of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act in 1978. Before then, Native people were beaten, jailed, and even killed for practicing their ancestral beliefs. What remains of tribal cultures customs, and ceremonies has been paid for in blood.

Among Native people, the warbonnet was only given to those who earned each and every eagle feather for their bravery, self-sacrifice, and great deeds of valor —doesn’t seem very appropriate to wear one as a costume or prop now, does it? Disrespecting the warbonnet is a terrible wrong and dishonors the likes of all who earned them with pride.

2. Don’t make children wear redface and reenact the re-telling of Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving reenactments are a whitewashed version of early U.S. history. The retelling of this story only glorifies colonization when we all know that the truth isn’t so pretty. In actuality, an official “day of Thanksgiving kept in all the churches for our victories against the Pequots” was said to have been proclaimed by Massachusetts Bay governor William Bradford in 1637, celebrating the slaughter of up to 700 Pequot men, women, and children.

3. Don’t promote the fetishization of Native women.

We should all know this by now, but since not everyone acts like it, we’ll say it louder for the people in the back —Do not dehumanize women of color. We’re not your fetish and will not be devalued any longer. Reducing Native women to a fetish is oppressive and objectifying. It subjugates Native women while denying their agency.

Native women face higher rates of violence than the general population. A report last year by the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center found that more than half of Native women have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime and 96% of those who commit sexual violence against Native women are non-Native.

4. Don’t support racist mascots.

It’s 2019 and the sports team, Washington R*dskins, literally has a racial slur in its name. It mocks Native identity, it reinforces ignorant and racist caricatures of a whole culture.

5. Don’t pretend to know better than Native people on Native subjects.

I’d like to believe that Native people know more about being Native because well…they are Native, they’ve lived the experience daily. Native people know more about their heritage than non-Natives do and silencing their voices is equal to erasing them.

What’s more, don’t bother Natives on social media by sending them the worst instances of cultural appropriation and racial violence that you may stumble upon while scrolling. Natives who are present in online spaces see it often. Even if you mean well, for Native people, constant exposure to this sort of toxic environment is damaging and exhausting.

6. For the love of God, don’t buy culturally appropriative products from Non-Native vendors.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, do not buy Native imitations at places like Urban Outfitters or other stores who have actually been on trial for stealing names, references and designs from Native people.

Under the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, “it is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian or Indian tribe or Indian arts and crafts organization, resident within the United States.” Violators may face civil or criminal penalties of a fine up to $250,000 or five years behind bars. Before buying goods from a purported Native vendor, ask them if they are following this law, and what tribe they belong to. It is not offensive to ask a person who claims to be Native what tribe they hail from. Tribal identification is commonplace and accepted among Natives.

7. Do teach real Native history to children and read up on works by Native scholars and authors.

Introduce real and accurate Native history —including harvest feasts—into school events. Invite Native speakers, authors and scholars to speak to students about Indigenous peoples. It’s important that children see Natives as contemporary living people who are still here.

8. Do respect Natives’ beliefs.

It’s pretty easy; respect other people’s religion and belief systems as you would your own. There are many differences among tribes, but in general, they all share a reverence for the land, for animals and plants, for the bonds of community, for the wisdom of the elderly and for the contributions of their ancestors. Their beliefs and traditions might differ from what you grew up learning, but Native perspectives are just as compelling and valuable as everyone’s, and they should be respected as such.

9. Do respect and honor Native-Veterans.

Natives have served in the U.S. military at a higher per capita rate than any other ethnic group in the 20th century, and in the military actions following September 11, 2001, Native men and women veterans served at a higher rate than veterans of all other ethnic groups, according to the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. As we remember those who have given their lives in service to our country while protecting the freedoms and ideals we hold dear, many of our fellow Americans remain unaware of the major contributions Native Americans have made to our nation’s armed forces.

10. Do buy authentic Native goods sold by Native artisans and businesses.

Stores like Urban Outfitters or Anthropologie, are taking valuable business away from actual Native American artists and small businesses. Support Native American creativity, history, and legacy, and help create a much-needed economic boost in Indian Country by shopping from small, authentic Native businesses. This site has enlisted Native-owned businesses you can shop from online —now you have no excuse.

Just In Time For Gifting Season: JLo and ARod Dropped An Affordable Sunglass Collab Collection With Quay Australia

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Just In Time For Gifting Season: JLo and ARod Dropped An Affordable Sunglass Collab Collection With Quay Australia

Just as there is a separation between the church and state, so too, we’ve been told to set strict boundaries in business. “Never mix pleasure with business,” goes the saying, as old as time. And we all know that keeping friendly, or even worse, romantic, relationships with people with whom you do business is not always a good idea —Unless you’re the ultimate power couple, then by all means, mix it up, finesse us all and show us how it’s done. J.Lo and ARod are just that couple. And their venture into business together is off to a pretty good looking start.

Jenny from the block mixed business with pleasure on her latest collab with her sportsman partner Alex Rodriguez, except for her, the partnership was more like a good idea than a bad one.

instagram @quayaustralia

JLo and ARod teamed up with Australian eyewear brand Quay Australia to create a range of glamorous statement shades that won’t set you back more than $60.

The couple shot the campaign for their collection in Miami—a place they both call home.

instagram @quayaustralia

The singer and actress posed with the former baseball shortstop in a series of sultry, tropical-infused images to promote the couple’s sunglass collection. The dynamic duo shot the campaign in Miami. “It was really special to be able to shoot in Miami with Jennifer, she was the one who introduced me to Quay Australia,” said ARod in an interview with Elle. Lopez, on her part, told People how shooting in Miami felt natural, since it’s the place she calls home. “I’ve had a love affair with Miami for many years, and now it’s our city—it’s our second home,” she added.

ARod and JLo are the only couple who can color coordinate their outfits and still look stylish af.

instagram @robzangardi

The series of photographs feature the powerhouse couple coordinating looks in bright, bold colors giving them that #couplegoals look that many of us have tried and failed at achieving. “It’s always easy when we get to do things together,” Lopez told People about shooting the campaign. “We always wind up laughing out loud.” —couple goals I tell ya.

The shades are divided into two collections, but all the styles are unisex.

Instagram @robzangardi

The dual collection is already shoppable on Quay Australia’s website. None of the shades cost more than $60, and while Alex and Jennifer have ‘his’ and ‘hers’ product pages, both ranges work pretty well on both men and women.

JLo gave her shades, witty names in Spanish while ARod chose more classic styles and names.

Instagram @quayaustralia

Jennifer’s selection is tad bit flashier —to be expected from the queen of the Bronx— they feature fancier, bolder hardware. Another detail we loved, is that J.Lo gave her shades, names in Spanish, like “La Reina,” “La Playa,” and “El Dinero.” Alex’s options though, are more understated and classic, the shapes come with a thin wire rim and they feature names such as “Poster Boy” and “Apollo.”

“I’ve followed the brand for quite some time and love how they are disrupting the eyewear category. I’ve never had a pair of sunglasses that fit so well and the fact that you can get high quality, polarized sunglasses for $50 is pretty great,” Alex said —and we couldn’t agree more on that price point remark.

The ‘Hustlers’ star first collaborated with Quay in March.

Instagram @jlo

When her first collab dropped —on the same month that she announced her engagement to Alex Rodriguez after two years of dating— J.Lo took to instagram to share the news and her love for sunglasses; “Sunglasses are my accessory of self-expression. I can wear them from the gym to the red carpet, and this line perfectly captures the sporty, but also sexy and glam vibe that I love!”

The brand has always been great at teaming up with celebrities to create glasses people want.

Instagram @quayaustralia

Quay Australia’s most recent A-list partnership was with Chrissy Teigen, who told Harper’s Bazaar that she really wanted to ensure her looks worked for all kinds of different face shapes and preferences. “I tend to lean towards oversized sunglasses because I don’t love putting on a full face of makeup every day.” This idea seemed to be kept in mind for J.Lo’s second Quay launch as well. Though there are lots of different small options available, we have to say, the big ones are still our faves.

Comprised of 18 styles, the line offers a wide selection of chic glasses – featuring bold shields, flirty cat-eye shades and classic aviators. Shop the collection at quayaustralia.com.