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In California, It Will Soon Be Illegal To Discriminate Against Someone Because Of Their Natural Hair Texture Or Style

The California workplace is about to get a lot more inclusive.

On Thursday, California’s state assembly unanimously voted to pass the Crown Act, a bill that will ban employers from discriminating against people with natural hairstyles and textures, including afros, locs, twists, cornrows and other ‘dos that have largely been used as a method to treat Black workers, in particular, unfairly.

The Crown Act, which was introduced by Sen. Holly Mitchell, is now heading to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk, who will sign it into law, PEOPLE reports. 

The legislation, the first-ever statewide ban on natural hair discrimination, will expand on California’s anti-discrimination laws, ensuring that the definition of “race” goes beyond skin color and includes “traits historically associated with race.”

“There are still far too many cases of Black employees and applicants denied employment or promotion — even terminated — because of the way they choose to wear their hair,” Mitchell told CNN. “I have heard far too many reports of black children humiliated and sent home from school because their natural hair was deemed unruly or a distraction to others.”

In December, a Black high school wrestler in New Jersey was forced to cut his locks by a referee just before a match. The news made national headlines and prompted outcries of discrimination throughout social media. This month, the state legislature introduced a bill that would similarly update New Jersey’s discrimination law to include protection for “traits historically associated with race, including, but not limited to, hair texture, hair type, and protective hairstyles.”

“This is a movement to protect Black citizens from systematic discrimination because of a hairstyle,” New Jersey State Assemblywoman Angela McKnight told NJ.com. “We’re more than that. This is a civil rights issue.”

A similar ban against natural hair discrimination already exists in New York City.

Read: These Curly Chicas Taught Me How to Embrace My Natural Hair

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5 Hair Care Products And Routines For Healthier Locs

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5 Hair Care Products And Routines For Healthier Locs

We’re not quite out of the woods when it comes to the dry air of winter, but with summer rays ahead, there’s no doubt it’s time to keep a lookout for strands. With the threat of the sun’s heat damage just around the corner, we’re concentrating on products and styles that will be the ultimate saving grace when it comes to no breakage and frizzies.

Women on Reddit have been sharing their favorite products, below!

Check them out!

“I love reading what other people do for their hair and taking inspiration (so far I’ve found a great hairspray based on a post in redpillwomen sub) for products, techniques and such. I hope you don’t mind sharing your routine-be as detailed as you like!

Mine : My hair is long (waist, but a good bit below hip length when wet), curly and medium thickness. I also have somewhat problematic and oily scalp. So the longest I go between washes is 3-4 days. By this time, my scalp is oily and my length needs the moisture. But, if I cannot for some reason wash the whole length, I braid it and do a scalp only wash.

In the shower after shampooing my roots, I finger detangle my hair with lots and lots of conditioner, rinse, then add conditioner again and fingercomb through again (this eases out all the knots) and rinse. Afterwards I apply leave-in mixed with some water, maybe a serum and gel or mousse. I typically airdry or blowdry. I have a diffuser but I don’t like using it so much as I feel like it makes my ends split more. I have long bangs, so those I straighten.

Whenever I feel like my hair is getting a bit frizzy, I re-wet it slightly with my palms and reapply my leave-in products. I brush the roots and bangs everyday since they are quite straight, but other than that, the most detangling between washes is gentle fingercombing to separate curls while dry, or when I’m dampening my hair in the morning I might gently fingercomb out some knots. The bangs and roots I like to blast with some hairspray to give some volume and hold.

I don’t use heat on the length (besides blowdrier) and I also don’t dye anymore, as I want to grow my hair even longer. I trim it myself when the ends need it.

Occasionally, I might do a deep treatment. I used to have a schedule, but I fell off it. Need to get back to it!

(This is my first time making a post here, so sorry if I did something wrong!)”- u/deathbypurple

“Hair background: I’m not sure if I have thick hair, or just a lot of it, but the volume is not lacking! It’s got a mind of its own as far as texture – sometimes more wavy, sometimes more straight, sometimes even straight up curly. Length – mid-back to low-back, depending on whether I needed a big chunk of dead ends chopped off. Dyed religiously because prematurely gray is not my style. :'( Because of this dying, my hair is crazy dry. And I live in a really humid climate.

Products!

  • Olaplex No. 3 – I use this pre-shampoo/condition about twice a month. Truly a hair saver. If I could only own a single hair product, it would be this! Makes my “hay” hair soft again, and tones down the tangles.
  • Oribe Royal Blowout – this is a heat styling spray that I use if I’m going to blow dry or use heat styling. Smells amazeballs!
  • Oribe Anti-Humidity spray – To be honest, I don’t know how much this helps, but it makes me feel better about walking out into 90% humidity after I just finished styling my hair. Also, smells amazeballs. 🙂
  • Deva Curl Low Poo – One of the shampoos I alternate between. I don’t use it for the curls/waves so much as I do for the gentle formula and softness it brings out in my hair. Does NOT smell amazeballs, haha.
  • ION Purify shampoo – This is the other shampoo I alternate between. We have extremely hard water (I’ve also gotten a shower head filter, but still hard) and the build up needs washed out. Supposed to be good for after swimming in chlorine too. My hair feels weird after rinsing it out, like it’s dying for the conditioner, but feels SUPER soft after conditioning and drying.
  • Deva Curl Conditioner – One of the many conditioners I alternate between. This is one that I usually use after the Deva Curl shampoo. Smells weird, but softer hair, so I tolerate it.
  • Argan Conditioning Mask – Another conditioner I alternate with. I use the heavy duty conditioners/masks once a week because of the dry texture of my hair. This one is a holy grail hair mask! Smells soooooo good and hair is like silk…or as close as it can get after dying every 6-8 weeks for over 7 years!
  • It’s a 10 Hair Mask – I definitely like this hair mask, just not as much as the Argan one. Smells great – nicely conditions.
  • Oribe Glaze – I use this halfway between my hair colorings. It’s supposed to help bring the shine back like right after you get your hair dyed. I don’t like how it makes my scalp feel after using it…kinda greasy/build-up-y feeling, so that’s why I use it so sparingly. Plus it is heavily perfumed, and while I like it, I have eczema so I’m cautious about what washes down my body in the shower.”- sthutton

“Wow, thanks for taking the time to write such a thorough routine, I really enjoyed reading about all the products 😀 🙂

I totally agree with you on the heatstyling – there is only so much you can achieve on hair without heat. Unfortunately, for me the choice would be either short and heatstyled, or long and naturally curly with all it’s imperfections, as my hair takes heat really badly. I still can feel the damage from straightening some front pieces for my prom haha 😀 And my bangs split like crazy.

Aside from that, and maybe it’s just a lie I tell myself, but I feel like my long curls are a kind of my special trademark feature, something that sets me apart from other women (but I also know it’s a big turn off for some men). I could fight against it with heat styling tools and chemicals, or work with it by trying to make what I naturally have look it’s best.”- deathbypurple

“I co-wash once or twice a week, apply leave in conditioner while my hair is soaking wet and wrap it up in a microfiber head towel. I keep product use as low as I can to extend my time between washes (I hate product build up!) and use whatever generic curl creme I can find on sale to reduce the frizz factor. I never use heat on my hair, so I hope that helps keep it healthy and damage free.

I’m looking forward to my next hair cut, I could really use a trim and maybe some style or layers cut in.”- UnconventionalFemme

“Hi there, I have really thick hair with a light wave, so I need to get it thinned all the time. I get blonde highlights so it can be quite dry. I hate washing and drying it because I’m a mum and ain’t no one got time for that. So I’m maybe twice a week (max) and occasionally once per week. Eek! Dry shampoo is a godsend for mum’s. And the bun trend. Yay. I use a moisturizing shampoo and mask, a smoothing product and just dry it off before bed. Then the next day if I wake up before my toddler I’ll get to straighten it.

I’ve just had a big chop and got a ‘lob’ haircut, which is fun. When my sister (hairdresser) has time she is going to super blonde it and put in a ash blonde toner which will be interesting.”- MrsRobertshaw

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Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

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Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

Beverly Hills, one of the most well-known destinations in the country and world has long been a thriving and prime area for real-estate. Long before it was colonized by the Spanish, and was largely populated by rich white elites, the Indigenous people of California known as the Tongva, thrived there.

Hundreds of years later, in the 1830s, when the area was colonized, Maria Rita Valdez Villa, the granddaughter of Spanish colonists Luis and Maria Quintero and the great-granddaughter of an African slave was granted the original 4,500-acre of Beverly Hills, then known as El Rancho Rodeo de las Aguas.

Yes, as it turns out the foremother of Beverly Hills was a Black Latina!

During her ownership, Maria Rita oversaw cattle ranching and farming.

According to LA Magazine, Rita “was well known for holding a yearly celebratory rodeo under a famous eucalyptus tree at what is now Pico and Robertson boulevards.”

Sadly, after working the land for so much time, three Indigenous Californian outlaws attacked the ranch in 1852. The attack led to a shootout amongst “a grove of walnut trees at what is now Benedict Canyon and Chevy Chase drives” and eventually in 1854 Maria Rita decided to sell the area to investors Henry Hancock and Benjamin D. Wilson for $4,000.

Perhaps there’s a chance for justice for Maria Rita in the end.

Recently, Los Angeles County officials revealed that they were contemplating returning a beachfront property that was seized from a Black family nearly a century ago.

According to the Guardian, Manhattan Beach used “eminent domain” in 1924 to force Willa and Charles Bruce, the city’s first Black landowners, of the land where they lived. “The Bruces also ran a resort for Black families during a time when beaches in the strand were segregated,” explained the Guardian in a recent report. “Part of the land was developed into a city park. It is now owned by Los Angeles county and houses lifeguard headquarters and a training center.”

Manhattan Beach county Supervisor Janice Hahn announced that she was looking into ways to restore justice for Bruce family. Options include delivering the land back to the family, paying for losses, or potentially leasing the property from them

“I wanted the county of Los Angeles to be a part of righting this terrible wrong,” Hahn explained in a recent interview with KABC-TV.

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