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The Pageant Circuit Just Hit The Black Girl Magic Rizos Trifecta And I Am Sparkled

Three of the United States most watched beauty pageants just made the events a whole lot more colorful.

This week 28-year-old Charlotte, N.C. based attorney Cheslie Kryst was awarded the crown for Miss USA.

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Her win came following pageant victories of three other Black women, Kaleigh Garris for Miss Teen USA and Nia Imani Franklin for Miss America. It’s another big Black moment in pageant history that will see Kryst in a crow and off to represent our country in the Miss Universe pageant.

Kaleigh Garris, the winner of the Miss Teen USA title, wowed audiences earlier this week when she made her win while wearing her crown of natural curls.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BsUDeNlFhU1/

“The night before, I finger curled every single piece of my hair in the shower, which led to a very long shower, but it was for the greater good,” Garris told Refinery29 in an interview. “I know what I look like with straight hair, with extensions, and with my curly hair, and I feel more confident and comfortable with my natural hair.”

Now, none of the women who won the pageants are Latino but its IMPERATIVE for our community that we receive this type of representation.

Black Latinos make up a significant aspect of the Latin American community but are so rarely represented and it’s imperative that Latinas with African roots be allowed to celebrate in these exciting Black moments!

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

Jerod Harris / Getty

Machismo.

If you haven’t experienced it, you’ve definitely seen it. Most Latinas have watched it take form beneath the roof of their very own family homes and have experienced it first hand. From being glaringly aware of how much less time their brothers and papas spend in the kitchen to constantly being told to play less aggressively than the boys, most girls see it at a young age.

The children of celebrities are apparently no different.

Speaking about experiencing double standards in her own household, while growing up with her brother Jaden, Willow Smith got real on the Red Table Talk.

On this week’s Red Table Talk, Willow opened up about experiencing machismo with her mother, Jada Pinkett Smith and her grandmother Adrienne Banfield Norris.

“There is a difference between how Black moms treat their daughters and their sons,” Willow said in a clip. Willow went onto share that in her own experience it extended to “something as simple as getting up at the right time” where her mother would hurry her out of the house before school, Meanwhile Jaden was given more leniency.

“It was like, ‘You better get up. You better get dressed.’ I’d be in my room going like, ‘OK, I gotta get…,'” Willow says while acting stressed and hurried. “But then Jaden is there and she’d be like, ‘Uh, so are you ready to uh…’ and he’d be like, ‘Uh, maybe one moment.'”

Willow spoke about how machismo affected her while she would be “ready at the door” for school. While mimicking Jaden’s pace, and noting how slow he was going, Willow explained that he would be “getting his shoes on” with a lot less urgency.

“That’s true,” Jade laughed, “She might have a point. Because I was like she better be on it. You? Nah.”

Likely, Pinkett’s comment refers to her desire to see her daughter pay more attention and work harder in school.

“For me, I knew that she’s gonna have it twice as hard,” the “Girls Trip” star said. “I needed you to be strong because I know what this world is like for us as Black women… My fear for having a Black daughter and what I felt like she needed to be in this world put me in a position to be a little harder on her.”

And in ways, Pinkett’s reasoning comes from a place of well-meaning. After all, a study from The State of Black Women in Corporate America 2020  found that African-American women are repressed beyond belief in the United States underlining that Black women “who seek promotions at the same rate as white men, are only 58 percent as likely to be promoted to a managerial position and only 64 percent as likely to be hired into such positions. At a disadvantage from the beginning of their careers, Black women see the representation gap continue to widen and end up accounting for only 1.6 percent of vice presidents and 1.4 percent of C-suite executives, while white men hold 57 percent and 68 percent of those positions.”

Red Table Talk airs this Tuesdays at 9 a.m. PT/12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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Megan Thee Stallion Pens New York Times Op-Ed, Gives Two Scholarships To WOC: ‘Protecting Black Women Should Not Be Controversial’

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Megan Thee Stallion Pens New York Times Op-Ed, Gives Two Scholarships To WOC: ‘Protecting Black Women Should Not Be Controversial’

Prince Williams / Getty

Classy, bougie, outspoken.

Ever since making headlines at the start of 2020 for her hitmaker “Savage” rapper, Megan Thee Stallion has used her voice to call out injustice and celebrate women of color. In July her voice in these realms became even more loud and vital when she became a victim of an act of violence by a man. Now, the 25-year-old rapper is working vigorously to educate others about the importance of protecting Black women through her music, charity, and writing.

On Tuesday Megan Thee Stallion penned a New York op-ed about the fight to protect Black women and educate the world about their struggle.

In the opinion piece titled “Megan Thee Stallion: Why I Speak Up for Black Women,” the rapper tackles everything from her own recent experiences with gun violence to the legacy of Black women officials, including Democratic vice-presidential candidate Kamala Harris.

At the start of her piece, the rapper commented on how “Black women are expected once again to deliver victory for Democratic candidates. We have gone from being unable to vote legally to a highly courted voting bloc — all in little more than a century.” She notes that “despite this and despite the way so many have embraced messages about racial justice this year, Black women are still constantly disrespected and disregarded in so many areas of life.”

She went onto point out that her recent performance on “Saturday Night Live” and how her recent experience of being allegedly shot by singer Tory Lanez led her to initially remain quiet. “My initial silence about what happened was out of fear for myself and my friends. Even as a victim, I have been met with skepticism and judgment,” she explained. “The way people have publicly questioned and debated whether I played a role in my own violent assault proves that my fears about discussing what happened were, unfortunately, warranted.”

“I recently used the stage at ‘Saturday Night Live’ to harshly rebuke Kentucky’s attorney general, Daniel Cameron, for his appalling conduct in denying Breonna Taylor and her family justice,” she noted. “I anticipated some backlash: Anyone who follows the lead of Congressman John Lewis, the late civil rights giant, and makes ‘good trouble, necessary trouble,’ runs the risk of being attacked by those comfortable with the status quo. But you know what? I’m not afraid of criticism. We live in a country where we have the freedom to criticize elected officials. And it’s ridiculous that some people think the simple phrase ‘Protect Black women’ is controversial. We deserve to be protected as human beings. And we are entitled to our anger about a laundry list of mistreatment and neglect that we suffer.”

Megan went onto share her own experiences as seeing herself through the eyes of others as a Black woman.

“Beyond threats to our health and lives, we confront so much judgment and so many conflicting messages on a daily basis. If we dress in fitted clothing, our curves become a topic of conversation not only on social media, but also in the workplace. The fact that Serena Williams, the greatest athlete in any sport ever, had to defend herself for wearing a bodysuit at the 2018 French Open is proof positive of how misguided the obsession with Black women’s bodies is,” she went onto write. “I would know. I’ve received quite a bit of attention for appearance as well as my talent. I choose my own clothing. Let me repeat: I choose what I wear, not because I am trying to appeal to men, but because I am showing pride in my appearance, and a positive body image is central to who I am as a woman and a performer. I value compliments from women far more than from men. But the remarks about how I choose to present myself have often been judgmental and cruel, with many assuming that I’m dressing and performing for the male gaze. When women choose to capitalize on our sexuality, to reclaim our own power, like I have, we are vilified and disrespected.”

The rapper’s op-ed comes on the heels of an announcement that she will be giving out two scholarships to women of color pursuing higher education.

Megan announced earlier last week that she wants to celebrate other women of color who “Don’t Stop” pursuing their higher education by giving out scholarships.

As part of a partnership with Rap Rotation, Amazon Music’s flagship global hip-hop brand, the rapper launched her Don’t Stop Scholarship Fund on Oct. 8. The scholarship fund is named after her newest single which features Young Thug and will go out to two female students pursuing an associate, bachelor or postgraduate degree in any field.

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