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The Pageant Circuit Just Hit The Black Girl Magic Rizos Trifecta And I Am Sparkled

Three of the United States most watched beauty pageants just made the events a whole lot more colorful.

This week 28-year-old Charlotte, N.C. based attorney Cheslie Kryst was awarded the crown for Miss USA.

Twitter

Her win came following pageant victories of three other Black women, Kaleigh Garris for Miss Teen USA and Nia Imani Franklin for Miss America. It’s another big Black moment in pageant history that will see Kryst in a crow and off to represent our country in the Miss Universe pageant.

Kaleigh Garris, the winner of the Miss Teen USA title, wowed audiences earlier this week when she made her win while wearing her crown of natural curls.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BsUDeNlFhU1/

“The night before, I finger curled every single piece of my hair in the shower, which led to a very long shower, but it was for the greater good,” Garris told Refinery29 in an interview. “I know what I look like with straight hair, with extensions, and with my curly hair, and I feel more confident and comfortable with my natural hair.”

Now, none of the women who won the pageants are Latino but its IMPERATIVE for our community that we receive this type of representation.

Black Latinos make up a significant aspect of the Latin American community but are so rarely represented and it’s imperative that Latinas with African roots be allowed to celebrate in these exciting Black moments!

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Black Women Are Talking About The Frustrations Of Being Mistreated In The Office

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Black Women Are Talking About The Frustrations Of Being Mistreated In The Office

It’s no secret that when it comes to navigating and thriving in a work environment, women have it particularly difficult. Especially when it comes to climbing up the corporate ladder. For Black women, however, the challenges of this climb are especially strenuous. According to LeanIn.org and McKinsey & Company’s 2019 Women in the Workplace study, “Black women and Latinas are more likely
to be held back by the broken rung.”

Not surprisingly, Black women have a lot to say about the lack of equal opportunity in the office space.

 Check out their answers below!

“I still get some of this shit on occasion, but I’ve worked at my place long enough that people know to keep out of my business unless we’re talking business. I’m also fortunate to work for people who only care about your numbers and what you close on (finance) and crack down quick on racist/sexual harassment bullshit.

Imo, being great at your job gives you a lot of leeway, and women don’t often take advantage of it enough. Like when a co-worker implied I got my degree because of affirmative action, I set him straight quick with photos of my college acceptance letter and scholarship for academic performance.

Then I told my immediate rep and added that I’m just here to work and do good work, while casually dropping the fact that my sales were ~350% above the floor average. That perked him up enough to deal with the situation right then and there and bump the guy down a level.

Obviously being assertive doesn’t always work out in your favor, and sometimes it can even get you burned. But there’s something to be said for flexing the muscle you’ve built up and using Capitalism, your own generated value, as leverage. Even if it’s not your immediate boss, odds are there is someone in the hierarchy of your company who doesn’t fuck around and recognizes the problem perverts and bigots generate for employee performance (and litigation).”- Quixadashani

“Head. Phones. As soon as they start up with the problematic conversations in the office, slip them bad boys on and listen to a podcast or playlist.

I also had to learn to mind my ps and qs. Meaning be on time and make sure I’m doing everything by the book. Make sure I’m great at my job. They can’t come for you when they don’t have any dirt on you. Being able to check people in a nice way is paramount. I’m still working on that part. They pulled some mess last week when they tried to kick me off a volunteer charity team because they don’t like me or whatever. I called them out saying, “Why are y’all acting funny?” Oops, not the best way to handle it.” –leftblane

“Where do I start. First off my story is going to be a bit of a one off. Alot of the issues I faced in my office were actually caused by other people of color (Asians and Latinx, specifically). I’m one of four African Americans that work in a small company, and the only one on night shift. I’ve been there for two years. During those two years I have been there I’ve been called degrading names. I hear dehumanizing “black jokes” aimed and told directly to me on a daily basis. Most of the time these little shenanigans are pulled once upper management leaves or when they are not around. My tipping point was realizing that HR was useless because a lot of the things I was getting ready to report have already been reported for years.

The icing on the cake was in the beginning of November 2017. I overheard the companies president, a white guy in his 60s, use the N-word three times in a span of 10 minutes. So then I knew, I couldn’t go to anyone in the company to get any of these issues resolved. I personally have taken a radical approach to solving the issues for myself. I started recording everything they said to me. When there try to pull some of their racist games on me I threaten them. When one decided to try and pet me like I was some sort of dog, I told him I was going to break his hand, and I wasn’t kidding. I don’t recommend taking that approach, but it’s gotten them to stop bothering me. Shit most don’t talk to me anymore or dare stand next to me, which I like.

The company recently promoted a new person to night shift supervisor, he’s been with the company for 15 years. I’ve been helping him transition into his new role, as I know about a lot of the policies and technology we deal with. All while still taking care of my own workload. He’s been begging me to stay because of the help I’ve been giving him. When I told him about the things that I have had to put up with, he said he would address it immediately. The next day he sent one of the perpetrators home early for their antics, and that’s just the start. So who knows, maybe I might stay a little longer since I’m planning to move out of the state next year. But other more appealing I.T. jobs are out there that I’m eyeing. Plus my second job is trying to offer me full time, although it’s retail and not I.T. related. So it’s good having a backup plan.

Oh, I also go to the gym, I actually recommend it. Takes your mind off a lot. My particular gym needs a punching bag though. Sorry for the essay and long read. Probably the longest post I’ve ever typed on a phone, and posted on a site.” –DarksideImperialist

“I really get where you’re coming from because I work in a specialist field too. I sit and wonder if I were in another field would they have had the balls to try some of the crap that they have.

The gym is a good shout to go vent out some frustration, it’s next on my summer list of things to do. I’m slowly starting to make my way back out because all the stress had caused me to retreat into myself and hardly leave the house except for food or work because it essentially because my safe haven. I’m hoping your situation gets a lot better soon!”- beautynerds

“If it’s that bad, I’d leave. Few jobs are worth all that discomfort.

That being said, I’ve been in toxic work environments that have had black women stay employed there for long periods of time. They either cut out all social contact with everyone so no one feels comfortable enough to do the microagressions and things are always awkward with them or they do their best Ben Carson impression. Neither really pans out well for black women, so again, I say find a new job and try to get a raise out of it.”- Worstmodonreddit

I work in the nuclear industry so it’s quite a unique job, so although I have been looking it’s been difficult to find something of a similar calibre, let alone better. I’ll also admit that there’s a bit of a fear factor over the devil you know, but I’m getting over that now. My mentor managed to organise a move of departments for me so I could have a bit of a reprieve but it’s only made me realise that living in the boonies gives folk an excuse to be ignant. It’s a work in progress.”- beautynerds

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Highlighting Missing Black Women: A Mother Is Searching For Daughter Who Hasn’t Been Seen Since Appearing With Bruises On Her Face

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Highlighting Missing Black Women: A Mother Is Searching For Daughter Who Hasn’t Been Seen Since Appearing With Bruises On Her Face

According to Women’s Media Center, an estimated 64,000-75,000 Black women and girls currently remain missing in the United States.

Regarding the alarming rates at which Black children and Black women go missing, activists have done their best to highlight and sound the alarm in regards to the lack of coverage concerning this issue. They’ve worked hard to highlight the barriers Black families face when it comes to reporting missing loved ones (including mistrust of law enforcement), and the disparate ways law enforcement treat disappearances.

So when it comes to highlighting Black women and children at risk, it’s important to us that we help families act quickly.

Tiara Lott, 22, has been missing since January 29. 

Lott’s mother, Patricia Davis, says she was last seen on a video chat with one of her friends. At the time, her face appeared bruised.

“She was sore. They asked her, ‘What’s the address?’ to send an Uber and the phone hung up. Then 10 minutes later she sent out, ‘God forbid, if anything happens to me, that I love y’all and tell everybody.’ “

Davis says the last person she believes that her daughter saw was her boyfriend.

Lott’s family say that they have not seen or heard from her boyfriend, but have heard that he remains in the area in which she went missing.

According to Davis, Lott was in a house on Gold Street in Buffalo city’s Lovejoy neighborhood. Since Lott’s disappearance, her family has gone to the house and managed to recover some of her belongings.

“We found her clothes in the house, her boots. We went back to the house four days later, and we found my baby’s coat with her IDs in it,” Davis told Buffalo’s local news outlet 2WGRZ. After managing to recover video and pictures from surveillance cameras in the neighborhood the family is asking Buffalo Police to step in and conduct a search.

The family is currently offering a $5,000 reward to anyone who has information

“I’m out here everyday looking, running up in abandoned buildings, train tracks. I’m going crazy right now,” Lott’s mother said.

Lott is an East High graduate from Buffalo who was recently about to begin a new job in telemarketing. Her family has described her as an outgoing, loving, and fun shopper.

Anyone with information about Lott are asked to call 911 or the confidential tip line (716) 847-2255

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