Fierce

Cheetos Made Their Official Couture Debut At New York Fashion Week And It’ll Make You So Thirsty

New York Fashion Week is coming in hot! On Thursday Cheetos’ held their first-ever runway show inspired by the iconic snack Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. Rapper Saweetie performed on the Haus of Flamin’ Haute runway. Flamin’ Hot Cheetos have become something of a cultural phenomenon after being cited as the snack food darling of the Latinx and hip hop community. 

The collection incorporates the branded iconography with of-the-moment street style. The Haus of Flamin’ Haute guests sipped on Flamin’ Hot Sunrise cocktails, sushi rolls sprinkled with Cheetos, and a beauty bar with Cheeto manicures. 

Consider throwing on a Cheetos T-shirt to honor your Latinx heritage. Flamin’ Hot Cheetos were invented by Mexican American Richard Montañez, a former custodial worker at a Frito-Lay plant. He created the unique flavor combination decades ago, and his story will be told in the Eva Longoria directed-biopic Flamin Hot. 

A song of Icy and Fire. 

“Being a childhood fan of the whole brand — Flamin’ Hots, puffs, regular Cheetos, all of them — it was just super exciting to be asked to do this,” said Saweetie told the Hollywood Reporter. “Pulling up today and seeing Cheetos’ vision come to life was amazing. Also, I was looking forward to seeing the clothes and showing off my own dope look.”

Saweetie rose to fame by posting short raps on her Instagram account in 2016, where she now has 3.5 million followers. The 26-year-old’s singles “Icy Grl,” and “My Type,” have gone viral, eventually making it into Billboard’s Hot 100 Chart. She released her debut album High Maintenance in 2018. 

“My first fashion week, which was not too long ago, I was sneaking into events and shows,” she said. “Now, I’m being asked to perform, which is really exciting. This is the first fashion week where I feel like I’ve finally got the hang of things and tonight is the perfect way to kick it off.”  

A Flamin’ Hot evening.

Cheetos’ Haus of Flamin’ Haute wasn’t just a runway show, so much as it was an installation and celebration of the snack food. Renowned costume designer Ami Goodheart and her collaborators chose to elevate the theme. The highlights included a punchy, crimson red tulle gown by J. Bolin, an orange jumpsuit from Nava Rose, and a Goodheart-designed headpiece made of Cheetos wrappers combined with a Cheeto-lined cape. 

Orange is the new black.

While the Haus of Flamin’ Haute may not be accessible to all, fans of the brand should know Cheetos and Forever 21 have recently launched a collection together.  The collaboration features branded leggings, cropped tops, bodycon dresses, socks, and bicycle shorts.

A word from Chester Cheetah.

It is no surprise that the brand is strong, considering Flamin’ Hots have been referenced in hip hop culture for years now. In 2012, Y.N.RichKids, a children’s rap crew, released the viral hit “Hot Cheetos & Takis.” Last year, Cardi clowned her husband Offset on Instagram for putting Flamin’ Hot Cheetos in his turkey sandwich. Yung Miami from City Girls detailed her snacking habits to Hot New Hip Hop, which included Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, sugar straws, and gummies. 

Cheetos is perfectly aware of their place in hip hop history. This winter Chester Cheetah dropped a Doritos diss track. “Next time you try to take what I got. Remember I’m flamin’ hot, and you’re flamin’ not,” Chester Cheetah raps. I didn’t know the chip game had so many beefs. I am perched for the drama!

How a Latinx saved Frito-Lay. 

Mexican-American Richard Montañez began working at a Frito-Lay plant in Rancho Cucamonga. It was the late ’80s and he was making $4 an hour as a custodian. At 18 years old he was unable to read and write. Following the advice of his grandfather, Montañez took pride in his job, however, overlooked it would be, he wanted to be the best. 

“Every time someone walked into a room, it would smell fresh,” he told The Hustle. “I realized there’s no such thing as ‘just a janitor’ when you believe you’re going to be the best.”

Ambitious and hardworking, Montañez made himself seen through his work. After a decade, he began shadowing superiors. While watching a salesman restock inventory, he had an epiphany: company sales were down, but there were no products made for Latinxs. 

I saw our products on the shelves and they were all plain: Lay’s, Fritos, Ruffles,” he recalls. “And right next to these chips happened to be a shelf of Mexican spices… nothing spicy or hot.”

Eventually, Montañez, through a combination of naivety and fearlessness, snagged a meeting with the CEO. They were sold on his new flavor. Today he is Vice President of multicultural sales for PespiCo America (the company that owns Frito-Lay). Latinxs don’t have fairy tales, we have hard work and our wits. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Yalitza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

Fierce

Yalitza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

Dior/ Youtube.com

In the two years that have passed since her debut as an actress in the 2018 Academy Award-winning film Roma, Yaltiza Aparicio has established herself as a Hollywood “get.” The Indigenous actress has appeared countless times on the cover of magazines, ones like Vogue México and Vanity Fair, and has been featured in ad campaigns for designers like Rodarte. So it’s no surprise that she has now been tapped to be part of Dior’s new campaign “Dior Stands with Women.”

As part of an effort to celebrate women across the film, beauty, and health industries Dior has launched its “Dior Stands with Women” campaign.

On Monday, the fashion brand announced it had launched a series of short films honoring women and their contributions to the industries and communities which they occupy. The campaign features actresses like Yaltiza Aparicio, model Paloma Elsesser, dancer Leyna Bloom, Cara Delevingne, Charlize Theron, Parris Goebel, and others.

In a statement about the campaign, Dior announced their intent in a post on Instagram. “Inspired by the exceptional women who have marked its history, Christian Dior Parfums unveils a series of short filmed portraits that give a chance to speak to extraordinary women,” it reads.

Speaking in the portrait series, Aparicio explains “For me, being a woman means being strong, always holding your head up because they tell you what they say, you must be sure of what you are capable of,” she went onto say that as “as an ambassador for UNESCO, my role is to represent indigenous communities with dignity. Give them a voice and visibility, which is something that we have lacked for a long time… Women have fought for many years for gender equality. It is not about being superior to men, it is about having the same opportunities, that in your work they give you a fair salary and not simply because you are a woman they pay you less or that they consider that you have fewer capacities simply because you are a woman.”

Speaking about their journeys, actresses Cara Delevinge and Charlize Theron touched on being unapologetic and part of male-dominated industries.

Check out Yalitza and the others in the Dior campaigns below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

These $1,200 Gucci Jeans Are Designed With Grass Stains Around The Knees And Are Not Worth The Joke

Fierce

These $1,200 Gucci Jeans Are Designed With Grass Stains Around The Knees And Are Not Worth The Joke

Gucci / Twitter

In these tough times, Gucci’s latest line proves that you might be able to get a fortune out of the jeans you use as workwear in the yard. The upscale label recently launched a new line of jeans and overalls featuring a grass stain effect on their knees. But these are not your father’s cutting the lawn jeans.

The oversized pants retail for a cool $1,400 and feature large pockets and side buttons…

Users on Twitter were quick to question whether or not the new jeans were a joke by Gucci or a reflection of just how tone-deaf the high-end label is.

“How did it take so long for this to become a thing? My entire wardrobe just became more valuable!” one user tweeted in response. A second user commented, “Yeah not a Good Look!!! Wouldn’t buy those Jeans at the Thrift Store for a Dollar!!!”

It wasn’t long ago that the designer brand received criticism for selling warn-in sneakers that were “treated for an all-over distressed effect.”

The kicks were valued at $870. The brand’s description of the shoe design boasted that it was inspired by “vintage” 70s styles.

“The Screener sneakers — named for the defensive sports move — feature the Web stripe on the side and vintage Gucci logo, treated for an allover distressed effect,” the website explained.

Takeaway? Money sure can’t buy good taste.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com