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All Of The Bad Skin Care Habits To Improve In the New Year

Updated June 3, 2020

A good skincare routine is always evolving and improving. In the pursuit of flawless, glowing skin, it’s hard not to whip out our wallets at the news of every beauty-related technological advance. However, we have to be honest with ourselves and admit that we can’t just buy our way to good skin. Good skin is built off of consistent, healthy habits.

And although we say we’d do anything for good skin, we’re also human. That means a late-night partying or the rogue urge to pick at our skin can derail all the progress we’ve made over the past few weeks. Luckily for us, the new year is a clean slate and permission for us to re-commit to the skincare goals we may have neglected as 2018 wore on. In celebration of the new year, we’ve compiled a list of skincare habits we pledge to change in 2019.

1. Sleeping on Dirty Pillowcases

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As the year wears on and our schedules get busier, it’s hard to remember to wash our clothes every week, let alone our pillowcases. But we mention this resolution because it’s important. Unclean pillowcases can be a breeding ground for acne-causing bacteria–and that breeding ground comes into contact with our faces every night. Yes, we can steadfastly remove our makeup every night, but our pillowcases remain a veritable waste dump for any straggling debris that’s left on our faces at the day’s end. And there is always debris. To combat pillowcase buildup, have a few pillows on rotation, flip them regularly, and wash them once a week. Your pillows–and face–will be cleaner.

2. Using Abrasive Exfoliants

Who doesn’t remember buying St. Ives’ Apricot scrub from CVS as a little girl and scrubbing our faces until they were red and raw? At the time, we thought we were helping our skin by giving it a much-needed exfoliation. But now we know that mechanical exfoliation like causes “micro tears” to the delicate skin of our faces. These “micro-tears” make our skin more vulnerable to environmental irritants and more susceptible to bacteria sneaking into our skin and inflaming it. In 2019, follow TLC’s lead and say no to scrubs.

3. “Forgetting” To Wear Sunscreen

If you compile a list of advice from leading dermatologists, the one thing they’re all guaranteed to agree on is this: use sunscreen. Every. Day. Along with “drink more water”, it’s one of those pieces of advice that we’ve all heard a million times, and we’re all still struggling to adopt as a practice. Not only do sunscreens have the reputation of leaving your face like a Kabuki mask, they’re also famous for leaving behind a greasy film that makes makeup slide around your face like a skating rink. Fortunately, skincare technology has advanced in the past few years and lightweight, sheer sunscreens are now easy to find. That means you have no excuse to slather on the sunscreen after your moisturizer every day. That’s right–Every. Day.

4. Picking At Your Skin

If you commit to changing any bad habit in the New Year, let it be this one: stop picking your face. We’ll be the first to admit that it’s hard to resist attacking a whitehead or clogged pore that looks ripe for popping, but most of the time, picking does more harm than good. Not only can it push more bacteria deeper into your pores, but it also inflames areas that were otherwise calm. Also, picking can leave permanent scars in its wake. Ladies, just say no to picking.

5. Sleeping in Your Makeup

We’ve all been there–you come home from a crazy night out, tipsy, tired, and ready to flop into bed. The last thing you want to do is drag yourself into the bathroom subject yourself to your seemingly endless skincare routine. So you decide to close your eyes for a few moments just to rest a bit before you wash your face and…you get the picture. We understand that washing your face before bed is sometimes just impossible, so at the very least, commit to removing your makeup every night before bed in 2019. This means keeping a pack of makeup remover wipes by your bedside at all times. That way, you’ll have no excuse to snooze in your makeup.

6. Not Washing Your Makeup Brushes

Our makeup brushes are one of the tools we use every day but overlook when it comes to upkeep. Like any device that comes into contact with our faces, they need a good scrub-down once in a while. Foundation brushes, especially, should be cleaned at least once a week. If the idea of committing to a makeup brush cleaning schedule seems daunting, invest in a brush-cleaning pad for your sink. Not only will it cut down cleaning time, but it will work to get deeper into the brush bristles, ensuring a more thorough clean.

7. Product Overload

With all the incredible skincare products out on the market right now, it can be tempting to buy everything you see that has a five-star review on Amazon. However, this approach to skincare can be counter-productive. Not only do some active ingredients react negatively together (like salicylic acid and retinoids), over-treating your skin can cause your skin to over-react. This means that your skin can over-compensate for its oil-loss by producing even more sebum to make up the difference. That can result in a one-two punch of dehydrated, oily skin. Keep your skincare regimen simple by sticking to cleansing, toning, and moisturizing with a few tried and true products on rotation. Your skin likes routine!

8. Drinking Too Much Alcohol

You may hate hearing this, but it’s true: alcohol is bad for your skin. Not only does drinking produce toxic byproducts in your liver, inflame your bodily tissue and dilate your pores, it also dehydrates your skin and overall body. If cutting out drinking completely is unrealistic, try to stick to less inflammatory alcohols like red wine, which contain the antioxidant resveratrol. That way, you can have your wine and drink it too.

9. Stressing Out

And finally, the bad skin habit that beats them all: stress. Science tells us that high levels of stress cause the body to release the hormone cortisol, which not only incites the over-production of sebum in your glands but can contribute to eczema and psoriasis flare-ups. Although we could write a whole thesis statement on the negative effects of stress on the mind, body, and spirit, we’ll keep it simple. In 2019, pledge to take things less seriously, breathe deeper, remain present, and put yourself first once in a while. That way, by 2020, you’ll be glowing from the inside out.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

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Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Ever notice how on some social platforms like Twitter or Instagram that you yourself are mysteriously unable to crop your display images on your own? That’s because Twitter prefers to let their algorithms make the decision. Over the weekend users on Twitter discovered the surprising dangers of letting algorithms crop your own images.

Education tech researcher Colin Madland drew attention to the issue while speaking out about how the video-calling program Zoom, often crops the head out of his black person coworker while on calls.

It didn’t take long for Madland and other users to discover that Twitter’s AIs use discriminatory equations to prioritize certain faces as well. In short, the social platform’s AIs prefer white faces over Black ones.

In response to the discoveries, a Twitter spokesperson acknowledged that the company was looking into the issue “Our team did test for bias before shipping the model and did not find evidence of racial or gender bias in our testing. But it’s clear from these examples that we’ve got more analysis to do. We’re looking into this and will continue to share what we learn and what actions we take,” they stated.

Of course, Madland’s discovery is nothing new. In 2019, test results from the National Institute of Standards and Technology revealed that some of the strongest algorithms online were much more likely to confuse the faces of Black women than those of white women, or Black or white men. “The NIST test challenged algorithms to verify that two photos showed the same face, similar to how a border agent would check passports,” Wired points out. “At sensitivity settings where Idemia’s algorithms falsely matched different white women’s faces at a rate of one in 10,000, it falsely matched black women’s faces about once in 1,000—10 times more frequently. A one in 10,000 false match rate is often used to evaluate facial recognition systems.”

Still, it didn’t take long for users on the platform to ask what other physical preferences Twitter has.

Turns out the AIs prefer Ted Cruz with large anime breasts over a normal-looking Ted Cruz.

(To better understand this Tweet, click the link above)

The user who tested the image of Cruz, found that Twitter’s algorithm on the back end selected what part of the picture it would showcase in the preview and ultimately chose both images of Cruz with a large anime chest.

It’s nothing new that Twitter has its massive problems.

For a platform that so controls and oversees so much of what we consume and how we now operate, it’s scary to know how Twitter chooses to display people with different skin tones. The round of jokes and Twitter experiments by users has only revived concerns on how “learning” computer algorithms fuel real-world biases like racism and sexism.

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Yalitza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

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Yalitza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

Dior/ Youtube.com

In the two years that have passed since her debut as an actress in the 2018 Academy Award-winning film Roma, Yaltiza Aparicio has established herself as a Hollywood “get.” The Indigenous actress has appeared countless times on the cover of magazines, ones like Vogue México and Vanity Fair, and has been featured in ad campaigns for designers like Rodarte. So it’s no surprise that she has now been tapped to be part of Dior’s new campaign “Dior Stands with Women.”

As part of an effort to celebrate women across the film, beauty, and health industries Dior has launched its “Dior Stands with Women” campaign.

On Monday, the fashion brand announced it had launched a series of short films honoring women and their contributions to the industries and communities which they occupy. The campaign features actresses like Yaltiza Aparicio, model Paloma Elsesser, dancer Leyna Bloom, Cara Delevingne, Charlize Theron, Parris Goebel, and others.

In a statement about the campaign, Dior announced their intent in a post on Instagram. “Inspired by the exceptional women who have marked its history, Christian Dior Parfums unveils a series of short filmed portraits that give a chance to speak to extraordinary women,” it reads.

Speaking in the portrait series, Aparicio explains “For me, being a woman means being strong, always holding your head up because they tell you what they say, you must be sure of what you are capable of,” she went onto say that as “as an ambassador for UNESCO, my role is to represent indigenous communities with dignity. Give them a voice and visibility, which is something that we have lacked for a long time… Women have fought for many years for gender equality. It is not about being superior to men, it is about having the same opportunities, that in your work they give you a fair salary and not simply because you are a woman they pay you less or that they consider that you have fewer capacities simply because you are a woman.”

Speaking about their journeys, actresses Cara Delevinge and Charlize Theron touched on being unapologetic and part of male-dominated industries.

Check out Yalitza and the others in the Dior campaigns below.

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