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El Paso Shooting Victim Spent Years Trying To Obtain A Visa For Her Daughter Only To Be Shot The Week She Obtained It

As we continue to wade through the details of the El Paso tragedy, we continue to learn more about the innocent lives that were taken on that day. We have twenty victims who all had families and friends who loved them. Children lost parents and parents lost children. In a way, we all lost a part of our community along with a sense of safety we assumed we had before this massacre. The heartbreaking stories are sure to continue as we learn more about the victims but this latest bit of information is truly devastating.

One of the twenty victims who was killed the morning of August 3rd, Gloria Irma Marquez, died days before she accomplished a 15-year quest.

Twitter / @ksieff

For the past 15 years, Márquez, who is a Mexican native, fought to get her daughter a United States Visa. The two have been separated for over 13 years and were waiting for the documentation to allow them to be reunited in the States. Unfortunately, Márquez never saw this come to pass. 

After news of the shooting broke, friends and family of Márquez tried to locate her. A friend of her daughter’s even created a Facebook post searching for the woman. However, it was no use. Márquez had been in that Wal-Mart when the shooting began and she had lost her life there. 

Heartbreakingly enough, her daughter, Ruby Romero, received her American Visa days after losing her mother. 

GoFundMe / Brianna Klein

The documentation came just in time for Romero to attend her mother’s El Paso burial. During this devastating time, Romero and her siblings are just trying to put the pieces of their lives back together. The loss of their mother was a devastating one but it was made worse by the physical distance forced between Márquez and Romero. 

GoFundMe fundraiser was started for the family by Márquez’s niece, Brianna Klein. In the fundraiser, photos and memories of the late mother and her family show a life full of love and dedication to her children. 

“Gloria was a dedicated mother, grandmother, and friend,” the GoFundMe states. “It’s in times like these that we come together to help people in these unanticipated times of loss and sadness to help one another and extend a helping hand to the people we care for.”

News of this sad event hit Twitter hard and users were quick to express the need for gun legislation.

Twitter / @lclord76

Whenever our nation faces yet another act of domestic terrorism, like what we saw in El Paso, the gun control debate refreshes. Honestly, the only way to prevent this from happening again is by voting out representatives who oppose sensible legislation that makes it more difficult to purchase assault rifles. As this tweet suggests, we need to vote for politicians that will have our — and not the gun lobbyists’ — best interest at heart.

Some Twitter users pointed out the importance of hearing these stories no matter how heartbreaking they are.

Twitter / @Cronewomanchane

Márquez’s daughter should have been celebrating the moment she received her Visa. Instead, she is faced with the trauma of burying her mother. There have been several tragic stories to come out of El Paso and it hurts every time we are confronted with them. However, we have to pay attention. Not just to honor the victims and their families, we also have to look at the reality that White Supremacy’s hateful rhetoric has created.

This Twitter user called out the absurd immigration process that the United States follows.

Twitter / @realsuejeffers

Besides the terrible assault that resulted in twenty deaths, the tragedy here is the immigration process itself. Any kind of system that would separate a mother from her child is inherently immoral. The treatment of immigrants by the United States government is subhuman. If a stigma didn’t exist that said that migrants were an “infestation” to this country, the massacre in El Paso wouldn’t have happened. For better or for worse, the disgraceful treatment of immigrants helps to radicalize and validate White Supremacy.

Our hearts go out the the Romero family and the entire community of El Paso. We’re sure this isn’t the last sad story we will hear from this tragedy and we will remember each one.

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Police Identify, Arrest Man Accused Of Destroying Beloved Jesus Statue In El Paso Church

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Police Identify, Arrest Man Accused Of Destroying Beloved Jesus Statue In El Paso Church

El Paso Police Department / elpasodiocese / Instagram

An important Jesus statue in an El Paso church has been destroyed and police have arrested the suspect. The statue in St. Patrick’s Cathedral was taken down and decapitated and the person police suspect to be responsible has been arrested.

Earlier this week, a 90-year-old Jesus statue was decapitated by a vandal who destroyed the St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

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We are saddened to announce the vandalism at St. Patrick Cathedral earlier today. The Cathedral was vandalized this morning at around 10:00am. A suspect came into the sanctuary at St. Patrick Cathedral and destroyed the almost 90-year-old statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, which was located in the center behind the main altar of the church. The church was open and available for prayer. A suspect has been detained by the El Paso Police department. The police are currently continuing their investigation into the vandalism. The Rector of St. Patrick Cathedral, Fr. Trini Fuentes, said, “I am in shock and we at the Cathedral are heartbroken over such an unexpected situation.” Bishop Seitz also expressed his sadness about the damage caused to the historic Sacred Heart of Jesus Statue. “This statue is one of my favorite representations of Jesus—his arms open wide in welcome, his heart aflame with love for us. I would often take inspiration from this image as I prepared for Mass.” “As sad as I am to see a statue attacked and destroyed, I am grateful that it was not a living person,” Bishop Seitz added. “But a statue, particularly this statue, concretizes and connects us to persons and ideals that are not visible to our eyes. They reveal to us realities that are close to us, but unseen,” he said. “At this point we do not know anything about the person who carried out this assault, but he certainly must be a person who is greatly disturbed to have attacked this peaceful place in our city and this image of the King of Peace. I hope this might be the impetus for him to receive the help he needs. He will be in my prayers,” Bishop Seitz added. “I am devastated at this irreplaceable loss as I know members of this parish community and the whole Church of El Paso will be. In this moment we will reach out in confidence to the One this statue represented and I know he will console us,” Bishop Seitz concluded. St. Patrick, Patron of Ireland and our Diocese, Pray for us.

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The community was rocked when the damage was reported. The statue has been behind the church’s main altar for decades. The vandal attacked the statue at around 10:00 a.m. when the church was opened for prayer when the vandal attacked.

El Paso police have arrested a man in connection to the vandalism.

According to a press release from the police department, 30-year-old Isaiah Cantrell has been arrested for the vandalism. The damage to the statue is estimated to be about $25,000 and Cantrell’s bail has been set at $20,500. El Pasoans are angered at the man for destroying the irreplaceable statue.

“This statue is one of my favorite representations of Jesus—his arms open wide in welcome, his heart aflame with love for us,” Bishop Seitz said about the destruction of the historic Sacred Heart of Jesus statue. “I would often take inspiration from this image as I prepared for Mass.”

Statues like the Sacred Heart of Jesus statue are important to communities that are used to seeing them. The destruction has left clergymen and parishioners angered and saddened by the loss of the statue. It is a historic part of the El Paso religious community having overseen masses since before World War II.

The Diocese of El Paso is raising money to help St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

The funds raised by the Diocese of El Paso and the Foundation for the Diocese of El Paso will be used on the St. Patrick’s Cathedral. The money raised will be used to fix the shattered statue as well as add security and do renovations to the famed church.

“I am devastated at this irreplaceable loss as I know members of this parish community and the whole Church of El Paso will be,” Bishop Seitz said. “In this moment we will reach out in confidence to the One this statue represented and I know he will console us.”

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One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

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One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Mario Tama / Getty Images

On August 3, 2019, a man entered a Walmart in El Paso, Texas and killed 23 customers and injured 23 more. The shooter, Patrick Crusius, went to the Walmart with the expressed purpose of killing Mexican and Mexican-Americans. One year later, the community is remembering those lost.

One year ago today, a man killed 23 people in an El Paso Walmart targeting our community.

The Latino community was stunned when Patrick Crusius opened fire and killed 23 people in El Paso, Texas. The gunman wrote a manifesto and included his desire to kill as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans he could in the El Paso Walmart. The days after were filled with grieving the loss of 23 people and trying to understand how this kind of hate could exist in our society.

Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso, is honoring the victims today.

Rep. Escobar was on the scene shortly after the shooting to be there for her community. The shooting was a reminder of the dangers of the anti-Latino and xenophobic rhetoric that the Trump administration was pushing for years.

“One year ago, our community and the nation were shocked and heartbroken by the horrific act of domestic terrorism fueled by racism and xenophobia that killed 23 beautiful souls, injured 22, and devasted all of us,” Rep. Escobar said in a statement. “Today will be painful for El Pasoans, especially for the survivors and the loved ones of those who were killed, but as we grieve and heal together apart, we must continue to face hate with love and confront xenophobia by treating the stranger with dignity and hospitality.”

El Pasoans are coming together today to remember the victims of the violence that day.

Latinos are a growing demographic that will soon eclipse the white communities in several states. Some experts in demographic shifts understand that this could be a terrifying sign for the white population. These changing demographics give life to racist and hateful ideologies.

“When you have a few people of color, the community is not seen so much as a threat,” Maria Cristina Morales, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at El Paso, told USA Today about the fear of changing demographics. “But the more that the population grows – the population of Latinos grow for instance – the more fear that there’s going to be a loss of power.”

The international attack is still felt today because of the constant examples of white supremacy still active today.

“It doesn’t occur to you that there’s a war going on, and there’s always been a war going on—the helicopters the barbed wire—but you just kind of didn’t see it,” David Dorado Romo, an El Paso historian who lost a friend in the shooting, told Time Magazine.

The sudden reminder of the hate out there towards the Latino community was felt nationwide that day. The violent attack that was planned out revealed the true cost of that hate that has been pushed by some politicians.

“El Paso families have the right to live free from fear, and I will continue to honor the victims and survivors with action,” Rep. Escobar said in her statement. “Fighting to end the gun violence and hate epidemics that plague our nation.”

READ: As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

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