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A Mexican Mayor Berated A Little Girl About Her Weight In Front Of Her Peers

Poor body confidence is an issue that afflicts 40% of U.S. girls who are as young as seven years old.

The knowledge that young girls are pressured to hate and alter their bodies at a young age is nothing new. You’ve heard this truth reported on by different digital content sites, on TV, magazines, through educators and more prominently: on the pages of your favorite celebrity Instagram pages. The origins of poor body confidence vary but more often or not they come from media, parents, spouses and often times machismo.

This truth is sad enough in itself but hurts all the more when we’re forced to see the withering of a young girl’s self-esteem on video. Particularly when the source of such pain comes from a man of influence and power.

Ahome, Sinaloa mayor Manuel Guillermo Chapman Moreno recently caught attention after a video of him doling out unsolicited criticism about a little girl’s weight went viral.

During a recent visit to Centro de Educación Inicial Indígena, the mayor attempted to project concern and empathy for the health of the children in the area.

While on camera and in front of the girl’s classmates and teachers, Chapman questioned the girl about her diet after she innocently commented that she enjoyed eating chicken and eggs.

Without ever asking whether the school in the district, which he oversees, offers healthy foods or space for outdoor activities, he began his interrogation.

“Sweets?” he asked her. “You like to eat sweets?” When the girl nodded Chapman turned to the teacher and asked, “What is the problem with this girl? This girl is frighteningly obese. Why?”

In response, the little girl’s teacher says “Because the mother gives what the girl asks and at any time.” Clearly uncomfortable the little girl visibly withers into herself before rushing away.

Users online were quick to criticize Chapman for his comments.


“What a dumb guy” one user wrote in response.

Many ridiculed him for his flip way of handling the situation.

“Obesity can be controlled with proper feeding, human stupidity has no cure,” another wrote.

Others pointed out how counterintuitive his comments were.

“But what a character as ignorant as this is going to be expressed about a girl, hurting her self-esteem, she doesn’t even have any idea how to deal with those health issues!”

Others highlighted how inappropriate his comments were given the setting.

“How can they allow them to expose a girl or child? And the other mitoteras also that hell care if their parents aware that they should talk to them in private and not expose the poor creature to be the mockery of all.”

Women Are Dragging Forever 21 By Their Strappy Yellow Bags For Sending Atkins Diet Bars In Their Bags

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Women Are Dragging Forever 21 By Their Strappy Yellow Bags For Sending Atkins Diet Bars In Their Bags

Our society is obsessed with diet culture. Often times, the quest for the “perfect summer body” or the most ideal figure can be very damaging to people dealing with weight loss and eating disorders. Further pushing of diet culture makes people negatively reflect on their body image — something that is more likely to create eating and anxiety disorders than to lose weight.

Another example of this ongoing issue popped up recently on Twitter and people are calling it a fatphobic attack on plus-sized women and a dangerous marketing ploy.

In a now-deleted tweet, Forever 21 shopper, Ganiella Garcia, shared that there was an extra item in her recent order from the shop.

Twitter / @wisekatya

She found that the clothing store had added a bonus sample of an Atkins bar to her order. The bars are from the special Atkins lines of low-carbohydrate snacks meant to help one follow the fad Atkins diet.

Garcia was upset and shocked that Forever 21 thought it was a good idea to add these to orders that were going to a plus-sized woman. She told Buzzfeed News about the incident, saying:

“I opened the bag and took the clothes out. Everything was fine. And then when I was trying things on, at the bottom there was a card and there was an Atkins bar in a little bag. It was very insulting, and honestly, I like shopping at Forever 21 — but I don’t feel comfortable buying clothes from a company that thinks I shouldn’t be the size that I am.”

Garcia went to Twitter with her story and soon found that she wasn’t the only one to receive the unwanted diet bar.

Twitter / @jessemarisaelao

Many women came forward to share that they were also recipients of these Atkins diet bars. Most people who experienced this extra item ordered from Forever 21’s plus-sized catalog but some bars ended up in orders sent to straight-sized customers too. This Twitter user shared an image of an order her mother placed. Sure enough, the same lemon Atkins bar is present in her order as well.

This tweet pointed out the dangerous message that is presented by sending unsolicited diet bars to their costumers.

Twitter / @theverbalthing

Twitter user, Samantha Puc, suggested that despite what their sizes may be, sending these bars to unaware customers with eating disorders could cause harm. Something as innocuous as a bar suggesting that they should lose some weight can trigger a bulimic or anorexic episode in someone working to overcome their eating disorder.

She went on to say more about how the clothing industry capitalizes on diet culture:

“Plenty of clothing companies monetize disordered eating and fatphobia to sell products, but this is a new level, Forever 21. Assuming this is a brand partnership with Atkins, is the money worth endangering the lives of your customers?”

Queer and Latinx Fat Story Teller, @MerQueenJude, also posted a response on her Instagram admonishing the clothing company for buying into fatphobic and dangerous marketing ploys at the expense of their customers.

“It is so dangerous to body shame and suggest that someone eat less or go on a diet,” she explained on her Instagram post. “You don’t know their history with food. As someone recovering from an ED, this would’ve set me back so far.”

Another Twitter user echoed Puc’s concern about the potential Forever 21 and Atkins partnership.

Twitter / @bronze_bombSHEL

Twitter user Shelby Ivey Christie pointed out that if this was meant to be a tie-in between the clothing company and the diet brand, it was done in a sloppy and tasteless manner. As she pointed out, the presence of the bars in predominantly plus-sized orders seems discriminatory and is defiantly distasteful.

It didn’t take long for Forever 21 to issue a statement defending themselves and reversing their stance on the diet bars.

Twitter / @TracyClarkFlory

A rep for Forever 21 responded with an official statement regarding the accusations of its costumers:

“From time to time, Forever 21 surprises our customers with free test products from third parties in their e-commerce orders. The freebie items in question were included in all online orders, across all sizes and categories, for a limited time and have since been removed. This was an oversight on our part and we sincerely apologize for any offense this may have caused to our customers, as this was not our intention in any way.”

While we’re glad that the potentially dangerous freebies will not be found in any unsuspecting packages from now on, we hope that Forever 21 learns from this misstep. When it comes to diet information and products, they should never be sent out unsolicited. Making observations about another’s body can have majorly unintended repercussions. Nobody should speak in a potentially negative way about another’s appearance or health. Diet and weight are personal, private and — frankly — no one else’s business.

She Shared Stories Of Being Fat-Shamed At The Doctor And Fear Of Wearing A Two-Piece Then, Jessica Torres Accidentally Built One Of The Biggest Body Positive Communities

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She Shared Stories Of Being Fat-Shamed At The Doctor And Fear Of Wearing A Two-Piece Then, Jessica Torres Accidentally Built One Of The Biggest Body Positive Communities

Maybe we all deserve hundreds more Jessica Torres to remind us that this world and its fashion isn’t just for las flacas. Jessica Torres is a plus-size model and body positive activist who isn’t going to be shamed for hiding her nalgas or accentuating the “right” curves. We have all the curves which means they’re all right.

Jessica Torres is keeping it real and combatting fat shaming by just straight up loving her self and her body. She’s calling out magazines every time they reshape a woman’s mind to cover their belly or show it off. She’s posting images of the “most unflattering outfit for [her] body type” to prove a point to the fashion industry. Fashion for plus-size women shouldn’t be about how to best cover and mask their bodies. It should be about fashion. If Jessica Torres isn’t the most fashionable chingona from the Bronx, we don’t know who is. I said it.

Her journey towards crop tops wasn’t out of self-love, but rather a love for fashion.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

She started her plus-size style blog to show off her outfits and inspire other plus-size women to live “fashionable fat lives,” she writes for HipLatina. Her blog was meant to be a stepping stone to get a job in fashion. 

Torres essentially became a body positive advocate by accident.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

“Any plus-size body that grows a following on social media and takes full body pictures is instantly labeled a self-acceptance warrior,” she said. She was just wearing bright colors and modeling off the clothes that inspire her, and a social media following just naturally happened.

Still, she didn’t love her body.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

But she did notice that she was holding herself back from embracing a diverse range of fashion because of her “body type.” Magazines love to dress women like they’re fruit: pear shapes, apple shapes, etc. Instead of dressing women for fashion, the clothes are meant to hide certain parts of their bodies.

Once she realized she was holding her fashion style back because of the “hate” she had for her body, she knew she needed to change.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Like so many of us, she didn’t walk outside in a crop top and a skirt for the first time feeling confident and gleaming with body positivity. But you fake it till you make it, and now, Jessica Torres identifies as a self-acceptance advocate.

For every outfit she was afraid to wear, she had the courage to open up about it on social media.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

She started sharing stories of being fat-shamed at the doctor and saw the comment threads as a communal space of support and inspiration for other ladies living while fat. When she was afraid to wear a two-piece for the first time, she wrote about that, too, and found other women who gained the courage to do the same in solidarity.

As her following grows, she’s also experienced fat-shaming within the body-positivity community.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

Her body was always being compared to Ashley Graham’s or Iskra Lawrence. When Torres went up a single size in pants, she noticed how society still only accepts certain curves that are deemed beautiful. Meanwhile, others promote obesity. 

Torres is staying present to the hypocrisies and to her self.

Credit: thisisjessicatorres / Instagram

Caption: “Throwing it back to that time I was butt nekkid and wet and Kelly told me to sit on her lap.”

Being a social media influencer hasn’t made her any less real.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Torres has partnered with Mod Cloth, Dove, and JcPenney to promote body positivity. She’s sharing her insider tips for strapless bras with the thickest, most comfy straps. She’s also still a person who tells publicists she farted. 😂

She’s not playing like her life is all together.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

While this would be very disappointing for all our mamis to read, it is deeply comforting to us all who have been traumatized by Saturday limpias. Where’s the link, Jessica?

Jessica Torres is the boss of all of us, and that’s how we like it.

Credit: @thisisjessicat / Twitter

Tell me more about how I can all parts of myself, not just the ones that make me look like an hourglass. Who chose hourglasses as the epitome of sexiness anyway? All we know is that self-hate is a time thief and we’re done robbing ourselves of love, time and fashion, thanks to Jessica Torres.

READ: This Latina Tries On A Thong For The First Time And The Results Are Relatable

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